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dee_burris: (Default)
Thursday, June 28th, 2012 07:02 am
It's kind of famous around here. People get married here, including my younger sister, back in the 1980s.

The Old Mill, located inside the city of North Little Rock, appeared in the opening credits of Gone with the Wind in 1939.

Photos taken October 2010.

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Image intensive... )
dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, December 28th, 2011 06:24 pm
The FSA captioned this one - a bunch of men hanging outside the Batesville Courthouse in Independence Co., AR.

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Photo from the FSA collection of the Library of Congress
dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, October 19th, 2011 12:23 pm
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also known as Central Kentucky Asylum for the Insane
It hasn't been uncommon for me to find some of my kinfolk committed to asylums of one kind or another.

But in the case of one of my many times removed Parrish cousins, I wonder why.

Sudie Parrish Vittitow was three months shy of her 74th birthday when she died at Lakeland Asylum on 25 Feb 1936.

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Sad, but telling that the place where she had lived for three years thought she was Sadie instead of Sudie.


A simple Google search tells some horror stories about the care and treatment at the place where Sudie lived for 3 years, 3 months and 13 days after her commitment - like how in the 1930s, cold showers, insulin injections, lobotomies and shock therapy were used to "cure" the patients, many of whom were just old and had dementia.

Some people say the place is haunted.
Sudie was the daughter of William Foster Parrish and Elizabeth Holbert. She was born on 15 May 1862 in Nelson County, KY, as were most of her ten siblings. She had a twin sister named Sallie.

She married twice, first to Samuel Vittitow, from whom she was divorced, and then to his cousin, Anthony, who died in 1929.

Altogether, Sudie had 8 children, including sons Clarence and Charlie, who had lived in their parents' home well into their adult years - and up to and including the 1930 census, when they were living with their newly widowed mother as men in their 30s.

So why was Sudie committed to an asylum?

I guess I'll have to wait and ask her on the other side...
dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, September 28th, 2011 06:51 pm
The Great Mississippi River Flood of 1927 has been characterized as the most destructive river flood in American history.

Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas were all affected, but Arkansas may have suffered the worst in terms of total land mass underwater.

About 6,600 square miles of the state - 36 of 75 Arkansas counties, or a total of 14% of Arkansas' land mass - were underwater. In some locations, the water was 30 feet deep.

More families in Arkansas - 41,243 - received public and Red Cross relief than in any other state.

My third cousin, Thurman Burris, died in the flood.

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Pine Bluff, Jefferson Co., AR - my photo of a photo found in the Jefferson County Historical Museum


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6 miles west of Elaine, Desha Co., AR - photo from Library of Congress


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Dermott, Chicot Co., AR - photo from Library of Congress
dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, September 21st, 2011 08:27 pm
The first Cathedral of St. Andrew was consecrated in 1846, at Second and Center Streets.

The current cathedral, located at 617 Louisiana Street, was consecrated in 1881 by Bishop Edward M Fitzgerald, who was only 33 when he came to Little Rock, and found five priests to serve the post-Civil War diocese. (He was the only English-speaking bishop, and only one of two prelates in the world, to vote against the declaration of papal infallibility at the First Vatican Council in Rome in 1870.)
Then...

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Now...
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The cathedral is still an active house of worship today.
dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, September 14th, 2011 07:36 pm
Union Station
Then, 1905-1915
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Now
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Union Station used to be a very important part of transportation in Arkansas.

When I was a kid, my grandmother, Louise Herrington, took me for a ride on an Amtrak train. We only hit a couple of the whistle stops before going back to Arkadelphia, but I thought we were big stuff...
dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, August 24th, 2011 05:38 pm
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Left to right: George Washington Burris, Jr.; his brother, Homer Burris; his cousin, Lee Jones; and his father, George Washington Burris, Sr., seated. [Oops, looks like Great Granddaddy got lopped off due to size...here it is, smaller.]

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Yeah, the Post Office figured largely in my family's lives...

Get a load of the dust in there...
dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, August 17th, 2011 08:52 pm
Then, with Pfeifers on the left. (The building was built in the late 1890s and operated as a retail and jewelry store in that location until 1963.) It was located at the corner of 6th and Main Streets.

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Now...image from Google Earth.

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dee_burris: (Default)
Thursday, August 11th, 2011 06:01 pm
About 20 years ago, I fell in love with the work of local artist, Richard DeSpain, and bought several of his prints of Little Rock and other areas of Arkansas.

This one was my grandmother's favorite.

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After I had it framed and showed it to her, I told her the store where I bought it said it was DeSpain's interpretation of a photo of Main Street taken in the 1920's.

Oh no, she decisively corrected me. That was in the teens. I remember going with Mama on the streetcar to pay the light bill, and that's exactly the way they had the turn marked.

In the 20's they moved the power company office, and you had to go farther down the street.


Missing you, Grandma.
dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, July 13th, 2011 09:11 pm
My maternal grandparents lived for at least 9 years in this tiny little rent house, still standing on Denison Street.

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Image from Google Maps



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1940 Polk's Little Rock City Directory


They were still there in 1949, which was the year they moved into the home they had saved for many years to build.

For cash.

Their "new" home never had a mortgage on it until it was sold to a new family after my grandmother's death in 1998.
Granddaddy's parents are shown in the left-hand column of the City Directory.

I couldn't find a decent Google Maps image of that address (or the one that I hope is still standing at 217 Denison), so my handy-dandy GPS and I are going to do some driving, cameras in tow.

The house at 217 Denison was a multi-generational home and will have its own entry, whether I can get a photo or not.

**It will be interesting to see how the GPS spells the street name - with one N or two...I find it both ways all over old documents...
dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, April 6th, 2011 07:34 pm
I love old postcards.

Two here from Hot Springs back in the day. Hot Springs is in Garland County, and was home to several of my relatives from southern Arkansas.

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Central Avenue, Hot Springs - card never mailed


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Arlington Hotel, on Central Avenue - postally used 1913


And Little Rock in 1908. I wish Center Street still looked like this today.

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dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, January 26th, 2011 07:39 pm
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George Burris, Jr. with unidentified friends on the steps of Subiaco in Logan Co., AR.
dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, December 29th, 2010 07:41 pm


That one was stuck in the Williams family photo album.

I'm guessing around World War I? I can't count the stars on the flag...

Some of the men are in shirt sleeves, and the trees at the far end of Main Street appear to be fully leafed out. So I'm saying early summer...

ETA: Thanks to Ryan - who has a very good eye for detail, I know now that this was Main Commerce Street, Russellville, AR.

And it could be before 1914...
dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, December 22nd, 2010 06:51 pm
It's a Catholic icon in Arkansas. Established after successful negotiations for the necessary acreage with the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad Company in 1877, Subiaco is a Benedictine monastery in Logan Co., AR within the Roman Catholic Diocese in Little Rock.

It is also near to the heart of one of my aunts and several of my cousins, as the Henry Lensing family were some of the German immigrants to the United States and Logan County whose lives were entwined with the church for many years.

One of my cousins and I visited Subiaco last summer on a blitz to locate gravestones of several of her ancestors on her father's side of the family.

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As we were touring the inside of the church admiring stained glass windows, she whispered for me to come here.

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That window was donated to the church by her father's favorite aunt, for whom my cousin was named.

It was a wonderful discovery during a trip seeking her roots.
dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, November 17th, 2010 06:20 pm
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Barkman House, 406 N 10th Street, Arkadelphia


According to the Arkadelphia Area Chamber of Commerce, the Barkman House was "originally owned by J.E.M. Barkman, son of early Clark County settler Jacob Barkman, this house was constructed by Madison Griffin, who built Magnolia Manor as well. Its ornamentation is known as "Steamboat" or "Carpenter's Gothic." The house was not completely finished when the Civil War began, and local legend reports that piles of lumber were taken from the front yard to build Confederate fortifications. Now owned by Henderson State University, the Barkman House is included in the National Register of Historic Places."

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Captain Henderson House Bed and Breakfast, 349 N 10th Street, Arkadelphia


According to the B&B's website, the 9,000 square foot Victorian era home was once home to Captain Charles C Henderson, and began as a small cottage built in 1876. In 1906, the cottage was incorporated into what became known as "The Big House," and was further enlarged in the 1920s.