July 2014

S M T W T F S
  12 345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Shakin' the Family Tree on Facebook

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
dee_burris: (Default)
Friday, September 21st, 2012 05:34 pm
Theodore Higgins Rollins passed over today. Those close to him knew him as Ted.

He was born on 9 Nov 1923 in Akron, Summit Co., OH to John Hooper Rollins and Anna Marie Rian.

He loved talking genealogy with me.

Ted's health had declined in the last few years, and he and his wife had moved from Faulkner County to Little Rock to be closer to their son.

Their son is my brother-in-law.

Ted was really proud to see his son marry my sister.

So was I.

Photobucket

Rest in peace, Ted.

We'll see you on the other side.
Tags:
dee_burris: (Default)
Tuesday, August 9th, 2011 05:36 pm
Every family has some interesting stories about past events.

My brother-in-law has told me a few of those stories about his family as I have searched his family history.

One of them involved his paternal grandmother, Anna Marie Rian.
Anna Marie Rian was the daughter of Niels Rian and Maria Leontina Fallstrom, immigrants from Norway and Sweden.

She married John Hooper Rollins in January 1920 in Buhl, St. Louis Co., MN.

The way the family story went, Anna Marie had stowed away on a commercial passenger ship with one of her girlfriends.

This one wasn't far off, except there was no girlfriend aboard ship with her, although she had some help from friends.

I found this clipping today from the Duluth News Tribune, 17 Jul 1919.

Photobucket


HOMESICK BUHL TEACHER BECOMES STOWAWAY, WINS
Growing weary of Honolulu, Miss Anna Rian Decides to Return to States


Buhl, July 16 - American pluck with an equal amount of Yankee determination resulted in the return to Buhl of Miss Anna Rian, daughter of a prominent local merchant who shipped as a stowaway on an ocean liner to get away from Honolulu, where she had been teaching school.

The story which came to light today is this. Miss Rian, two weeks before the close of her school term, heard the call of "home." A steamer was sailing within a few days for the states and to miss passage on that boat would mean the plucky little school teacher would have to remain several weeks longer. School teacher friends of the Buhl girl arranged to finish out her contract for her and allow her to leave.

Another obstacle presented itself, however. Miss Rian was under contract and the Honolulu school authorities stated she would not be permitted to depart. The American get-there-spirit asserted itself.

Stows Away

Miss Rian managed to get on the boat as a stowaway and she was soon on the ocean sailing for home shores. Three hundred miles out the captain of the ship discovered the young woman and advised her that a mail boat sailing for Honolulu would pass them and she would be placed aboard and sent back.

Luckily fate helped the Buhl girl and the mail ship delayed by a storm did not pass the ship until it was close to San Francisco.

In the meantime passengers had interested themselves in behalf of the young woman. "We will send you back," the captain stated to her one morning as he neared Frisco's shores.

"I don't care now, I can swim that distance," she is said to have replied. The captain later congratulated her. Miss Rian says the experience was worth the effort as it brought her home several weeks ahead of time.

Then, another article in the same newspaper, dated 30 Jul 1919.

PACIFIC OCEAN TRAVEL IS HEAVY, BUHL TEACHER SAYS
BUHL, July 29 - The transfer of the large Pacific Ocean steamers to the Atlantic ocean during the war is causing much hardship for persons in Honolulu who want to come to the United States, Miss Anna M. Rian says. She returned from Honolulu where she taught school recently.

"Hundreds are waiting at Honolulu for passage to the United States and all the steamers have been booked up until November," Miss Rian says. The recent articles which stated that she was a stowaway on a Pacific ocean steamer have been exaggerated, she said.

"When my school closed, I wanted to come home," Miss Rian said today. "It was a question of weeks of waiting, or getting aboard a steamer without a ticket. I chose the latter course, but about an hour after the steamer had left the harbor, I paid the purser for my passage and was listed as a passenger."
dee_burris: (Default)
Saturday, August 6th, 2011 01:22 pm
I found nineteen news articles and clippings from late 18th and early 19th century issues of the Dover Sun, (now available from Genealogy Bank) that related directly to my brother-in-law's extended Rollins family.

His ancestors settled in Strafford and surrounding counties as early as 1644, with patriarch James Rawlins arriving in colonial America in 1632 from Cornwall.

Even with the magnitude of information - well researched and documented - about the hsitory of the Rawlins/Rollins clan of New Hampshire, information found in these news clippings does not seem to be widely available, and adds that third dimension to the family members that I love so much.
As is unfortunately often the case, women rarely received mention except at their births, marriages and deaths.

Such was the case with many of the Rawlins/Rollins women.

Sometimes, even the death notice or obituary was very brief.

Photobucket
DIED, at Somersworth, Miss Susanna Rollins, aged about 15...daughter of Mr. James Rollins.
Dover Sun, 2 Mar 1805


Every once in a while, it was much lengthier.

Photobucket
Photobucket

OBITUARY
Departed this life on the 28th ult. in the 28th year of her age, Miss Rachel Rollins of Somersworth, daughter of the late Mr. I Rollins of that place. Her malady (a consumption), was long and lingering, attended with much pain and distress, which, agreeably to her uniform character, she endued with the mildness of the Dove, and the meekness of the Lamb. In the extremity of her sufferings, not a murmur, nor even an involuntary groan escaped her lips! She was all patience, and resignation. Such was the sweetness of her Disposition, it smiled at Grief! and such the purity of her Soul, the terrors of the gloomy Messenger fled before the heaven of her countenance. There, in the darkness of Death, Religion sat smiling, like the Star of even on the bosom of the night.

She was accomplished in her person and manners; possessed of a mind highly susceptible, with feelings exquisitely delicate, and tender as Pity itself. Modest almost to a fault, and chaste as the virgin snow. Her many graces and virtues, drew forth the warmest affection of her friends, and her ever decorous and amiable demeanour, endeared her to her acquaintance. She was a pattern to her sex in acts of kindness and charity to the poor, whose gratitude proclaimed her benevolence, and whose tears now feelingly bespeak the magnitude of their loss. Although cut off in the meridian of her days, yet she arrived to full maturity; for wisdom was her grey hairs, and her spotless life old age. -- As all her pleasing prospects below were vanishing in the darkness, they brightened above in the Paradise of light. Joyful her exit from this transitory scene; a dreary wilderness, a world of woe, a vale of tears! She has passed gloriously, triumphing through her REDEEMER, the billow-swelling Jordan of death, and gained, borne on a Seraph's blissful wings, the promised land, the heavenly Canaan. There grows the TREE OF LIFE, whose taste is immortality. There flow rivers of LIVING WATER, making glad the heavenly inhabitants. There tears are wiped from every eye - and there all her cares, pains, and sorrows are lost and forgotten, in the overflowing fountain of bliss.
Dover Sun, 5 Dec 1812


Something tells me Rachel was very much loved.
dee_burris: (Default)
Friday, August 5th, 2011 06:23 pm
Photobucket

Well, except for that 10+ hour long power outage on Wednesday afternoon until 2:09 a.m. on Thursday.

The hottest day and night since they have been recording such for Arkansas.

But the Entergy heroes came through, so we won't dwell on that...
Started looking into my brother-in-law's family genealogy for him this week, and today, I hit the mother lode.

Got my monthly update email from Genealogy Bank.

Looked to see what was new.

And swooned. (Okay, not really, but you know what I mean.)

They added the Dover Sun, published in the little New Hampshire town all his Rollinses are from.

About 40 years worth from the late 1700s through the beginning of the 1800s...

And so I have been, as we say here in the South, in high cotton all day long.
And then, what to my wondering eyes should appear...

No, not the sleigh and eight tiny reindeer, although I could stand some of *those* temperatures...

An email from a guy who found my online tree while trying to clear up a mystery in his own.

Turns out the wife of my paternal grand uncle, who married him at age 17, was married before that to this guy's great grandfather...at 15.

Mama signed a note.

But my grand-aunt still called herself "Miss" two years later when she married Uncle Homer...

So now Dad and I are wondering...did Uncle Homer know?

Surely...

But maybe not. If I've learned anything in the last few years of shakin' the family tree, it's that these Burrises could damn sure keep a secret...
dee_burris: (Default)
Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011 02:52 pm
Tracking the ancestors of some of the family in-laws...

Have just discovered, unbeknownst to him, that my brother-in-law named his blue and gold macaw after his 5th great-grandfather...

Not just a whole lot of Ichabods running around these days...