dee_burris: (Default)
 photo IsabelleHerringtonLockridgeandBenjaminThomasHerrington 2.jpg
Isabelle Jane "Belle" Herrington, and older brother, Benjamin Thomas Herrington.
Photo circa 1945.

During the last four or five years of her life, my Aunt Jean was a tremendous source of information about some of the folks in our family tree.

It was when she and I were looking at my copy of the photo above, shared by my Aunt Mary Ann, that Aunt Jean told me about Belle Herrington's first marriage. She said her grandaunt Belle - her mother's paternal aunt - had been married first to a man named Boyd Thomason. She said it was a brief marriage, and then, Aunt Belle married Smith Lochridge.

I dutifully made the notes, and later, set out to find out about Aunt Belle's first, brief marriage.
I never could find a record of that first marriage.

And to complicate things, I found Aunt Belle in the 1920 census in Sparkman, in Dallas County, working as a "servant in a hotel." I thought that was odd, because most of the rest of her family lived in Malvern, in Hot Spring County, with the exception of her oldest brother, Jasper, who lived in Clark County.

Aunt Belle was a widow with two children.

And her last name was Jones. I scoured all the usual places to find the departed Mr. Jones, to no avail.

And concluded that Aunt Belle was married to Mr. Jones no later than age 21, so how could there have been an earlier marriage to anyone named Boyd Thomason?
In the fall of 2013, I published this entry, stating that Aunt Belle had not been married to anyone named Boyd Thomason, and if anyone reading the entry could tell me who Mr. Jones was, to please contact me.

I got that contact last week, by email.

From a descendant of the Thomason family, who knew quite a lot about Aaron Boyd Thomason.

Aaron Boyd Thomason was born on 26 Nov 1878 in Butler Co., KY to Thomas Lindsey Thomason and Mary E Langford. He was nearly ten years older than Aunt Belle.

According to my Thomason correspondent, Boyd (he was called by his middle name) and his brother Vivian, traveled multiple times in the early 1900s to Arkansas, Texas and Oklahoma to work the oil fields and the timber industry. He surmises that it must have been on one of those trips to Arkansas that Boyd met and married Belle. He also said that Boyd owned a hotel and some stores in Arkansas and Oklahoma.

And he sent photos of the family that span a period roughly between 1910 (shortly after their daughter Ethel's birth) to about 1913, shortly after their son Thomas Boyd Thomason's birth.

 photo AaronBoydThomason_Ethel_Belle.jpg
Boyd, Ethel and Belle Thomason, photo circa 1910-1911

 photo AaronBoydThomasonandEthel.jpg
Boyd and Ethel

 photo ThomasBoydThomason.jpg
Thomas Boyd Thomason, born 16 Feb 1912

So then, I wondered...what happened to the marriage?

By 1920, Belle was calling herself a widow. That was a very common occurrence for women who were divorced, a shameful marital status in those days.

Both the children were born in Kentucky, Boyd's family home. I found a birth record for Thomas, and he was born in Paducah, McCracken Co., KY.

And I wondered about that. Why would Belle have been in Kentucky? Could her bridegroom have wanted to get her away from her own family? Was Belle's family disapproving of her choice in a mate?

But even more curious - why did Belle change her last name?
The Thomason descendant who emailed me had other information that caused me to think of some possible reasons why Belle Herrington was not simply content to be Belle Thomason.

In 1926, Boyd Thomason returned to Kentucky. To Logan County, where he robbed the Auburn bank. Although the bank robbery took place long after Belle and Boyd split (I keep remembering Aunt Jean saying it was a brief first marriage), what if Belle had become aware of some shady business dealings? Or some outright crimes?

I think it is possible that Belle and Boyd split up before he registered for the draft during World War I, in 1918. He did not list a wife as his nearest living relative.

 photo Boyd Thomason WWI draft card.jpg


What if Belle did not want to be connected in any way, shape or form to Boyd Thomason - and didn't want her kids connected to him either?

Or what if it was dangerous to be known as the ex-wife of Boyd Thomason?
Belle changed her surname and that of her children at a time when people could do that with no legal messiness. You just started using your new name, and that was that.

Her children retained Jones as their legal surnames - Ethel until her marriage to Orvel James Jones, and Thomas Boyd for the rest of his life, which included a stint in the United States Navy during World War II.

Belle remarried, to Smith Lochridge in 1927. They were living with Belle's daughter and son-in-law in the 1940 census, in Weleetka, Okfuskee Co., OK. Smith Lochridge died in 1941, and Belle spent her later years living in Weleetka, close to her daughter. Belle died in 1973 and is buried in Hillcrest Cemetery in Weleetka.

But Boyd Thomason lost the care and comfort of his family.
The 1930 census found Boyd doing time in the Kentucky Branch Penitentiary in Eddyville, KY.

I couldn't find him in the 1940 census. But I found him on 28 Apr 1943, in Terre Haute IN when he had to register for the old men's draft for World War II.

 photo AAron B Thomason no one.jpg


He was 64 years old, homeless, unemployed, and no one would know how to get in touch with him.

From my Thomason email correspondent:
His family here in Kentucky didn't want anything to do with him because he almost took them down with him. After the bank robbery, my grandfather rode him across the river in his wagon (not knowing he was on the run) and he hid the money under a fence post on my great-grandfather's farm (his brother). They were both mentioned in the newspaper articles and just barely avoided arrest. Nobody trusted him after that. I've heard a great aunt of mine who remembered him say he abandoned his family out west.
Aaron Boyd Thomason died on 24 Nov 1945 in Mount Vernon, Jefferson Co., IL. He was buried three days later in Oakwood Cemetery in Mount Vernon.

I understand he had cousins there.

 photo Aaron_Boyd_Thomason.jpg
Aaron Boyd Thomason

If any of the descendants of Ethel Jones (nee Thomason) Jones or Thomas Boyd Jones (nee Thomason) find this entry, you are welcome to right click and save on any of these photos.
dee_burris: (Default)
A photo of my paternal grandmother, Addie Louise Herrington (left) and her sister Florence.

Florence was the only daughter of the five born to Jasper Monroe Herrington and Julia Ann Callaway who *was not* a twin.

Photobucket
Photo circa 1925




This is a Sepia Saturday post. Head over there for a look at other wonderful old photos.
dee_burris: (Default)
For my new found cousin, Bob. (Actually, he newly found me.)

Having trouble sending photo files to him by email.

So Bob, just right click and save.

This photo is undated, and is a picture of Isabelle Jane Herrington and Benjamin Thomas Herrington, younger siblings of Jasper Monroe Herrington.

Photobucket
dee_burris: (Default)
I got a contact about my post on the very old Freeman place from a descendant of William Aflred Freeman.

She was excited to see the photos, which I invited her to copy for her own use. And she also gave me some more information about Freeman descendants.

Which I have dutifully researched and added to my GEDCOM.

We aren't cousins, but I keep up with the ones who married into my family anyway.

Because you just never can tell when someone might need some information.
I've spent some time this morning working on another family tree I manage for a dear friend.

Right now, I'm messing with Joseph Wesley Roach, born 16 Dec 1884 in Missouri and died 4 Jan 1978 in Randolph Co., AR.

My friend's mother is a Randolph County Roach. I know Joseph Wesley figures into her line of Roaches somehow - there were quite a few who stopped off in Missouri on their way south from Illinois to Randolph County. He named his sons some of the favored male Roach names - Jesse, James, Arthur.

I just can't find his parents.

Yet.
I'd love to be graving.

But it is just too fricking hot.

Every day, I get my Weather Channel text advising of dangerous heat indices. Not that I need the official notice.

We have reached that time in Arkansas summer where you can step outside your front door and feel that the air has mass from the combination of temperature and humidity. The cottage has not received any measurable rainfall since June 28.

I've been looking back at the family photos I have of ancestral homeplaces. Thinking about how it was that they tried to beat the heat of Arkansas summers before the days of air conditioning.

Like the Williams' home in Russellville.

Or the Herrington homeplace in Clark County.

Photobucket

Photobucket


In the two photos above, you can see 1) the shed behind the house, and 2) part of the covered front porch of the house.

The Williams home also had covered porches.

Did they sleep on them in the summertime?

More things that make me say, hmmmm...
dee_burris: (Default)
I didn't know for a very long time that Aunt Idelle was my grand aunt by marriage.

I thought she *was* a Herrington.

She was in nearly all the sister pictures taken of my grandmother, Louise Herrington and her sisters.

Photobucket
Louise Burris and Idelle Herrington
(The sun was in their eyes - they really did love each other)



Idelle was born on 22 May 1916 in Cleburne Co., AR to Stephen Douglas Sandage (who went by his middle name all his life) and Bertha Bailey. She was the only daughter, and had three brothers (at least three is all I can account for).

When she was grown, she took after her daddy and became a school teacher. I didn't know that until I saw the 1930 census for the family in Cleburne County, and saw his occupation. He taught in the public schools there.

Sometime between that census and 1932, the Sandage family moved to the DeGray community of Clark County, where they met the Herrington clan.

Apparently, if news accounts from the Southern Standard are any indication, the whole bunch hung out together for a little fun during the Great Depression.

Photobucket


Transcribing the relevant parts of my family's social acticities as reported on 24 Nov 1932...
DeGray
Health is good in our community at present...The party given by Mr. and Mrs. J M Herrington Saturday night was enjoyed by all...Mrs. Coleman Buck and son are spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. George Burris...Misses Bernice Herrington and Burna Graham spent awhile Sunday afternoon with Mrs. Rosie Buckley...Misses Bernice Herrington, Nannie Lou Trigg, Gladys Buck, Burna and Myrtice Graham and Corine Harvey and Messrs Otho Sheffield, Hoyle and Dan Graham and Alvin Buck spent Sunday afternoon with Miss Idelle Sandage...Mr. Roy Buck spent awhile with Mr. Robert Herrington Sunday...Gladys Buck took supper with Eunice Herrington Sunday night...Burna Graham took supper with Idelle Sandage Sunday night...Messrs Chester and Clarence Terrell, Robert Herrington and Hoyle and Dan Graham attended a party at Mr. and Mrs. Sam White's Saturday night.


Wonder if that was about the time Idelle Sandage and Robert Herrington were getting sweet on each other?


I don't have a date for Idelle and Robert's marriage, but their son, Robert Herrington, Jr. was born on 25 Feb 1942.

Photobucket
Bob Herrington and Bob, Jr. in
Hot Springs, AR, about 1952



Although she only had one child of her own, Aunt Idelle loved kids.

And we loved her back.

She died on 19 Mar 1999, and was buried beside Bob Herrington, Sr., in Ouachita Cemetery, Donaldson, Hot Spring Co., AR.

See you on the other side, Aunt Idelle.
dee_burris: (Default)
Photobucket


The photo had to be taken in the late 1920s, but before 1929, when my grandmother, Louise Herrington, married George W Burris, Jr.

We do not have a clue as to the identity of her beau.





Sepia Saturday is a blogging medium and theme suggested by Alan Burnett and Kat Mortensen.
dee_burris: (Default)
.

.

.
.

Photobucket

Louise Herrington Burris, on her 70th birthday in 1978
dee_burris: (Default)
One of the things I notice that my grandparents did was pose for sibling photos.

My sisters and I don't do that much. We probably should, if for no other reason than to continue family tradition.


Photobucket
Left to right: Idelle (Sandage) Herrington, Bernice Josephine (Herrington) Stevens, Florence Isabell (Herrington) Evans, Eunice Catheline (Herrington) Granite, Addie Louise (Herrington) Burris, and Hattie Inez (Herrington) Horne.


Photobucket
Left to right: Dora Emma (Burris) Crites, George Washington Burris, Jr., William Homer Burris, Ottis Gileston Burris, and Walter Monroe Burris. Photo taken 11 May 1958.


From the background in the photo above, I can tell they were at St Joe Cemetery in Pope County, on Decoration Day.

I'm also pretty sure that a certain unnamed woman had no idea her best side was showing.


Photobucket
dee_burris: (Default)
I don't know which one of them was born first on 17 Jul 1908 - my paternal grandmother, Addie Louise, or her twin, Hattie Inez. They were the first children of two sets of twins born to Jasper Monroe Herrington and Julia Ann Callaway. After them came:

Florence Isabelle Herrington, born 13 Feb 1910;
Robert Earl Herrington, born 23 Dec 1911; and
Twin daughters Bernice Josephine and Eunice Catheline Herrington, born 31 Oct 1913.

But Louise and Inez were not the first children born to their parents - not by a long shot.


In order to understand how just how many kids might have been underfoot in the Herrington household, you have to go back through the marriages for both Jasper and Julia.

Grandma's dad was married twice before he married her mother. (Some researcher say three times, but I have not been able to find any evidence of a marriage between Jasper and Emma Willman.)

On 12 May 1895, Jasper married Tabitha Luvenia Bailey in Hot Spring County. They had a daughter, Maude, born that year. Jasper and Tabitha divorced, which was something I didn't know until I started shaking the family tree.

On 15 Sep 1899, Jasper married a widow named Mary Ann (Cothran) Johnson. They had two children, Lillian (born 21 Jan 1902) and Richard (born in 1905). Mary Ann Herrington died in 1907.

So when Jasper Monroe Herrington married Julia Ann Callaway, he already had three children. He and Julia would have six more.

But that did not include Julia's children from her first marriage.


I know without having to be told how Julia Ann Callaway met her first husband, Robert Bruce McBrayer.

Both their families were longstanding members of the little Baptist church in their small Clark County community of DeGray.

They married on 13 Dec 1891 in Clark County, and had eight children:

Charlie H McBrayer, born 13 Oct 1892;
Maude C McBrayer, born 19 Nov 1894;
Larkin Wellington McBrayer, born 1 Mar 1896;
Twin daughters, Maggie Lee and Madgie Buck McBrayer, born 26 Jul 1898;
Verna McBrayer, born 5 Sep 1900;
John Ernest McBrayer, born in 1904; and
A stillborn infant, date of birth unknown.


How many kids were there in your family, Grandma?

Seventeen, including three sets of twins.


I'd dearly love to have a photo of the house that sheltered the Jasper and Julia Herrington family.

At the time of their marriage, they already had nine kids living at home. By the time of the 1910 census, there were eleven.

And we talk about those being "simpler times..."


Grandma became a nurse - an LPN at the hospital in Arkadelphia.

This was Louise Herrington in 1928.

Photobucket


When my dad handed me that photograph a couple of years ago, he remarked, Didn't I have a pretty mother?

He did, and the pretty little nurse caught the eye of the assistant postmaster at the Arkadelphia Post Office.

On 18 Nov 1929, Addie Louise Herrington married George Washington Burris, Jr. They had three daughters and one son. Eventually, there were thirteen grandchildren.

The George and Louise Burris family grew up in Arkadelphia, in a rock clad house on the corner of 9th and Crittenden Streets. My grandmother loved flowers and had a border that went all the way around the house, with huge hydrangeas on each side of the front door.

My grandparents loved having their family come to visit. Grandma spent hours cooking before and during those visits. She was one of a long line of women who believed most anything that happened to you could be faced much easier with a home cooked meal in your belly.

The noon meal was dinner and the evening meal was supper. You rose and retired with the chickens. (No, they didn't have chickens in town that I recall, but you got up early and went to bed early.)

During visits in the fall, my dad or one of the uncles would climb the pecan tree and shake it so we kids could get the nuts that fell to the ground. Grandma needed those for her famous Karo nut pies.

I loved doing that, but was really glad when I got too big to be the kid who sat on the ice bag (paper, back then) on top of the ice cream freezer in the summer, while a grown up cranked. We had all the Orange Crush ice cream we could eat.


As a child, I was lucky enough to be able to spend several days over a few summers with my grandparents.

The bacon frying fork always amused me, even as a kid. Grandma had one fork that she used for turning bacon in the mornings, and you weren't supposed to set the table with it. It was for frying bacon.

One summer when I was about 7 or 8, I spent a week with my grandparents. There was a sidewalk sale "uptown," and Grandma thought I might like to spend my little bit of mad money there.

We got ready and walked from the house to the sale. She didn't bat an eye when I bought myself a silver lipstick and proceeded to adorn my mouth with it. (I must have looked like a little ghoul.)

I had my eye out for a gift for her. About the third store, I saw them.

Earrings. Patriotic - red, white and blue earrings. They were clip-ons, like she wore. They had multiple dangling chains with red, white and blue balls all the way down the chains, which came half-way down your jaw. Not like what she wore. Ever.

But to my child's eye, they were beautiful. And a bargain, too - only fifty cents.

I waited until she was busy looking at another table, and made my purchase. The clerk wrapped them up in a paper bag under the table, so Grandma couldn't see.

I was going to wait until we got home to give them to her, but the excitement was killing me. I gave them to her on the spot.

She opened them up, and exclaimed over them. Gave me a big hug and a kiss.

And put those gawd-awful earrings on, in the middle of uptown Arkadelphia, and wore them all day.

And every day I was there that week.


Grandma quilted. She wasn't big into sewing per se, but she had a friend who was, and she kept all 10 of her granddaughters' Barbies incredibly fashionable for years.

She made quilts for each of us, starting with the oldest and each year, presenting our parents with the quilt of the year.

Over my childhood and into my young adulthood, Grandma made me two quilts. The first one was given to me when I was quite young, and my mother let me and my sisters take the quilts out to the backyard to make a tent over the clothesline with them. We weighted them down with rocks to keep them from flapping in the breeze.

Needless to say, I no longer have that quilt.

But I do have the last one she made for me before she died.

Photobucket


It's a Split Rail Fence quilt, and although I do still use it, I use it sparingly. It's hand-pieced and hand-quilted. You don't find that much any more.


Grandma died on 11 Jul 1980, just six days short of her 72nd birthday, and six years after my granddad passed.

I was living in Louisiana then, and didn't get home for the funeral. I also wasn't around to help my dad and one of my aunts in their effort to get a more equitable distribution of my grandparents' personal effects. The three of us are pretty sure there is quite a bit of the Herrington, Callaway and McBrayer family history mouldering away in the attics and storerooms of my two other aunts.

Time is on my side now. And I'm back home.


I make a few trips to Clark County now and again. On a trip last summer, I stopped by the house at 9th and Crittenden.

Photobucket


The passing of thirty years has not been kind to the house or the flower garden that Grandma loved so much.

Her immaculate flower borders are gone, ripped out and replaced by weeds and overgrown shrubs. The detached garage has almost fallen down.

I did see signs that someone was working on the house, as there were new windows hung on the west side.

Maybe someone will love it as much as she did.


Her memory remains, cherished by so many of us.

Photobucket

George and Louise Burris, at the side entrance of the house at 9th and Crittenden



See you on the other side, Grandma.

Profile

dee_burris: (Default)
Dee Burris Blakley

June 2015

S M T W T F S
 12 3456
78 910 111213
1415161718 1920
21222324252627
28 2930    

Shakin' the Family Tree on Facebook

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Aug. 4th, 2015 05:28 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios