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dee_burris: (Default)
Friday, July 12th, 2013 08:18 pm
Photobucket

In addition to the hundreds, maybe thousands, of scans of old family photos I have, I also have framed portraits and framed prints of some of the scans. After I scanned the tintypes of my Meek ancestors, I had them framed to preserve them. Tintypes are not original photos I throw away after they have been digitized.

My dead relatives' gallery is spread throughout my home. From time to time, I wander through looking at them, peering intently to see if I can find physical similarities between the ancestors and descendants.

And occasionally, I pause in front of one or two. The Jefferson John Meek family is a good place to stop for contemplation.
In this entry, I talked about my black sheep great-great grandfather, James Alexander Meek, who left his family in 1868, and was apparently vilified by his son ever after, even down through two more generations.

It was the letter by James' great grandson, Joe Thomas Meek, that made me realize I have no photos of James Alexander Meek dated later than 1868.

 photo JamesAlexanderMeek-1.jpg


James' daughter, Maxie Leah Meek - my great grandmother - never knew her dad. She was born on 10 Feb 1869, after James was gone. Her mother, Mary Emily Conner, remarried before Maxie was two years old, and the new blended family moved to Russellville, AR.

 photo MaxieLeahMeek.jpg


Maxie had quite a few photos of her dad in the photo album given to her and the man she married - Jo Desha Williams - the Christmas before their marriage.

That's where the tintypes were - in that album.

I think it's unlikely that Maxie's mother permitted her as a child to travel back to Mississippi to visit the father who abandoned her. Perhaps Maxie had a relationship with her paternal grandparents before their deaths in 1889 and 1891, when she was a young wife and mother.

She got the photos from someone. Maybe she inherited them when her father died in 1917. Her brother would not likely have wanted them, given his animus toward their father.

The photos of James Alexander Meek, as well as those tintype photos which were taken long before Maxie was born, make me feel the wistfulness of a daughter who wished she'd had a dad.




I am taking the Family History Through the Alphabet challenge, albeit starting a few months late.
dee_burris: (Default)
Friday, January 25th, 2013 10:44 pm
This is a photo I estimate to be circa 1868-1875 of the millinery shop owned and operated by my great-great grandmother, Mary Emily (Conner) Meek in Grenada Co., MS. (Click here to read more about her.)

Photobucket


From comparing the only known photo I have of her to this one, I think grandmama was the lady seated to the right of the post.

But I can't be sure.

This is a Sepia Saturday post, republished on 26 Oct 2013 for Sepia Saturday 200. Head over there for more wonderful photos.
dee_burris: (Default)
Sunday, November 25th, 2012 07:56 am
This post is not a fond remembrance of my great great grandmother. I can't remember a woman who died 45 years before I was born.

Photobucket


Her grandson, Jo Duffie Williams, was 10 years old when she died. I don't know - and he didn't ever say - if he attended her funeral, held in Sardis, MS.
For years, I wondered where she was buried. Her death certificate gave me the answer, and I created a memorial page for her on Find a Grave.

I made a request for a photo of the stone.

Just a little over two years after I created the memorial, another Find a Grave volunteer got the photo.

Photobucket
Here Lies With Hope in Jesus Christ Her Saviour
Emily Conner Meek Webb
4-12-1838
4-27-1913


Not only that, but after I thanked him, Larry Hart emailed me all the shots he had taken to get a photo he felt best captured the inscription on the stone which has fallen into the ground after nearly a century. In one of them, you can see that he had to kneel on the grass to get his shots.

He gave me his written permission to use the photos in any way I wished.
The stone is interesting.

The family Bible and her death certificate give Mary Emily Conner's date of birth as 12 Apr 1837. The stone says 1838.

And since her first name isn't on the stone, I wonder if she was called Emily all her life.

This Sentimental Sunday, I am thinking of the great great grandmother I never knew, and a man who knelt patiently in the grass one autumn day to provide her granddaughter a photo of her grave.
dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, October 31st, 2012 05:47 pm
Sometimes, I am a bit dense.

Last winter, I blogged about this really neat letter from Joe Thomas Meek I'd found in the massive Meek genealogy (authored by Melton P Meek).

In the letter, Joe had described a trip back to Mississippi, home for nearly a century to our direct Meek ancestors.

Joe Thomas Meek was the great grandson of James Alexander Meek, who was my great great grandfather.

Joe's grandfather was William Thaddeus Meek, 10 years older than his baby sister, Maxie Leah, who was my great grandmother.

As I was embedding some html code into the note field of my GEDCOM on several Meek entries, I re-read that letter, written in 1983.

And two paragraphs really hit me. (Parenthetical names added by me.)
None of the family ever saw old JAMES (James Alexander) after 1868, when he
and great grandmother
(Mary Emily Conner) parted.

None of the family can ever be named JAMES or ALEXANDER
again, as my grandfather
(William Thaddeus Meek) promised. An old lady at Oxford
gave us his picture, a little old man with the other old soldiers
in front of the old CourtHouse at Oxford in 1911.
I had it put in a nice frame to hang in my father's room
(Joseph Thaddeus Meek)
besides his favorite picture of his old grandmother, but he
would not have it. The Irish have long, long memories and
never forget any wrong, however remote.

None of the family ever saw old JAMES after 1868, when he and great grandmother parted.

What could have incensed William Thaddeus Meek so much about his father? Something so heinous that the rage was passed down to the next two generations?

Could it have been that William's father, after having been gone for three long years during the Civil War, deserted his pregnant wife?

My great grandmother, Maxie Leah Meek, was born on 10 Feb 1869 in Grenada Co., MS. Her mother, Mary Emily Conner, had been supporting her son William during James' Civil War service with her millinery shop, and continued to support both her children in that fashion after James left.

I had always assumed that James was around for the death and burial of his first daughter with Mary Emily Conner - a three year old named Lizzie - short for Hettie Ann Elizabeth (who must have been named for James' own mother).

Lizzie died on 28 Sep 1868, and is buried in Rose Hill Cemetery in Sardis, Panola Co., MS.

But perhaps James wasn't around for that event either.

If that is true, it certainly could account for the bitterness over the "wrong, however remote."

And I have to wonder if James' POW experience had lingering consequences for him.
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Saturday, June 2nd, 2012 09:19 am
Williams is a surname on my mother's side of the family.

I'm starting with Jesse, because he's the first in the line for whom I have documented and reliable information.

And I'm kind of impressed with Jesse - he served in the Revolutionary War, and lived to the ripe old age of 84, when he died after being kicked in the head by a horse he was shoeing...

My direct lines are in blue.


First Generation

1. Jesse Williams was born on 19 Jun 1750 in Newcastle Co.,, DE. He died on 29 Sep 1834 in Rockcastle Co., KY. The cause of death was femoral hemorrhage while putting shoes on a horse. He was buried in Phillips Fam Cemetery, Wildie, Rockcastle Co., KY.

Jesse married Elizabeth Rachel Gott daughter of Richard Gott IV and Elizabeth Unknown on 24 Nov 1774 in Baltimore Co., MD. Elizabeth was born on 3 May 1754 in St Thomas, Baltimore, MD. She died on 11 Oct 1794 in Culpepper Co., VA.

They had the following children:

2 M i. Joseph Williams was born on 6 Oct 1775 in Anne Arundel Co., MD.

3 M ii. Richard Gott Williams was born on 26 May 1776 in Fredericksburg, Culpepper Co., VA. He died on 3 Jan 1876 in Mt Vernon, Rockcastle Co., KY.
Richard married Catherine Holder on 23 Jun 1812 in Richmond, Madison Co., KY. Catherine was born on 4 Apr 1797 in Boonesboro, Clark Co., KY. She died on 2 Apr 1884 in Mt Vernon, Rockcastle Co., KY.

4 F iii. Elizabeth Williams was born on 16 Mar 1778 in Baltimore, Baltimore Co., MD. She died in 1878.

5 F iv. Susan Williams was born on 16 Sep 1781 in Culpepper Co., VA.

6 F v. Sarah Williams was born on 16 Jan 1784 in Orange Co., VA. She died in 1794.

7 M vi. John "Jehu" Williams was born on 11 Oct 1788 in Orange Co., VA. He died in 1859.

8 M vii. Jacob Williams was born on 29 Nov 1790 in Orange Co., VA. He died in 1841.

+ 9 M viii. David Williams was born on 1 Mar 1793. He died on 24 Jan 1858.


Second Generation

9. David Williams (Jesse) was born on 1 Mar 1793 in Orange Co., VA. He died on 24 Jan 1858 in Franklin Co, KY. The cause of death was gastritis, per death record.

David married Elizabeth Rowe, daughter of Thomas Rowe and Rachel Keeling on 15 Sep 1817 in Orange Co., VA. Elizabeth was born on 15 Feb 1789. She died on 10 Jul 1855 in Franklin Co., KY.

They had the following children:

+ 10 M i. Jacob Williams was born in 1822. He died on 29 Oct 1900.

+ 11 F ii. Hettie Rowe Williams was born in Apr 1825. She died on 18 Feb 1906.

+ 12 F iii. Elizabeth (Bettie) G Williams was born on 22 Jan 1827. She died on 12 Dec 1895.

13 F iv. Millie R Williams was born on 12 Apr 1829 in KY. She died on 11 Aug 1900 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. She was buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

+ 14 F v. Susan G Williams was born in 1830. She died on 8 Nov 1861.

+ 15 M vi. Urban Valentine Williams was born on 9 Nov 1833. He died on 1 Sep 1920.


Third Generation

10. Jacob Williams (David, Jesse) was born in 1822 in Virginia. He died on 29 Oct 1900 in Russellville, Pope Co., AR.

Jacob married Catharine C Mueller, daughter of Jacob Mueller and Elisabeth MNU about 1848. Catharine was born on 28 May 1825 in Baden Germany. She died on 14 Jan 1876 in Kentucky. She was buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

They had the following children:

16 M i. Lucien Eugene Williams was born in 1849 in KY. He died on 27 Dec 1900.

17 M ii. A Virgil Williams was born in 1852 in KY.

18 M iii. Urban Orville Williams was born on 21 Oct 1853 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

+ 19 F iv. Mildred Carlton "Minnie" Williams was born on 30 Jul 1856. She died on 16 Feb 1932.

+ 20 F v. Margaret Letcher Williams was born on 8 Mar 1861. She died on 19 Jul 1922.

21 F vi. Martha "Mattie" Williams was born in 1865 in Bridgeport, Franklin Co., KY. She died on 14 Apr 1930 in Chicago, Cook Co., IL. She was buried in Elmwood Cemetery, River Grove, Cook Co., IL.

Martha married Albert T Fisher son of Lewis Fisher and Elizabeth Richardson. Albert was born on 8 May 1855 in Massachusetts. He died on 28 Apr 1918 in Chicago, Cook Co., IL. He was buried in Elmwood Cemetery, River Grove, Cook Co., IL.

+ 22 M vii. Jo Desha Williams was born on 12 May 1866. He died on 23 Dec 1950.

23 M viii. Julian Otis Williams was born in Nov 1869 in KY. He died in Denver, Co.

11. Hettie Rowe Williams (David, Jesse) was born in Apr 1825. She died on 18 Feb 1906 in New Albany, Floyd Co., IN.

Hettie married Andrew Neat . Andrew was born in 1821 in Kentucky. He died before 1900.

They had the following children:

24 M i. Thomas C Neat was born in Apr 1842 in Franklin Co., KY. He died on 1 Feb 1908 in New Albany, Floyd Co., IN.
Thomas married Evaline S McDonald on 4 Jun 1868 in Floyd Co., IN. The marriage ended in divorce.Evaline was born in 1847 in Indiana.

+ 25 F ii. Ella J Neat was born in 1846.

+ 26 M iii. Addis Emmet Neat was born in May 1851. He died on 5 Sep 1904.

+ 27 M iv. Benjamin Crittenden Neat was born on 29 Aug 1856. He died on 12 Feb 1919.

+ 28 F v. Estelle A Neat was born on 31 Jul 1859. She died after 1910.

12. Elizabeth (Bettie) G Williams (David, Jesse) was born on 22 Jan 1827 in Anderson Co., KY. She died on 12 Dec 1895 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. She was buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

Elizabeth married Jeptha David Robinson, son of Owen Robinson and Sarah Gibson on 30 Sep 1847 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. Jeptha was born on 10 Dec 1811 in Franklin Co., KY. He died on 21 Jul 1892 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. He was buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

They had the following children:

+ 29 M i. David Owen Robinson was born on 25 Jul 1848. He died on 16 Nov 1926.

+ 30 M ii. Joseph Austin Robinson was born on 26 Oct 1850. He died on 14 Jun 1914.

31 M iii. Jabez Robinson was born on 19 Aug 1853 in Franklin Co., KY. He died in 1928.

32 F iv. Mary Robinson was born in 1857 in Franklin Co., KY.

33 F v. Hettie Elizabeth Robinson was born in 1858 in Franklin Co., KY. She died in 1927.

34 F vi. Ruth Robinson was born in 1861 in Franklin Co., KY. She died in 1908.

35 F vii. Susan Clementine Robinson was born in 1862 in Franklin Co., KY. She died in 1887.

+ 36 M viii. Jacob Urban Robinson was born in Jun 1864.

37 F ix. Sarah Gibson "Sallie" Robinson was born on 14 May 1867 in Franklin Co., KY. She died on 21 Oct 1950 in Jefferson Co., KY. The cause of death was coronary thrombosis, per death certificate.
Sarah married (1) Joseph Thomas on 4 Jan 1893 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.
Sarah married (2) Hewitt . Hewitt died before 1950.

38 M x. Frank Williams "Pretty" Robinson was born in 1869 in Franklin Co., KY. He died in 1908.

14. Susan G Williams (David, Jesse) was born in 1830 in Franklin Co., KY. She died on 8 Nov 1861 in Nelson Co., KY. The cause of death was typhoid fever, per death certificate.

Susan married George A Poor son of Erastus P Poor and Dorothy Grant. George was born in 1824 in Maine.

They had the following children:

39 M i. George W Poor was born in 1854 in Kentucky.

40 F ii. Elizabeth Poor was born in 1856 in Kentucky.

41 F iii. Carrie Belle Poor was born in Nov 1857 in Franklin Co., KY.

42 F iv. Millie Poor was born in 1860 in Kentucky.

15. Urban Valentine Williams (David, Jesse) was born on 9 Nov 1833 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. He died on 1 Sep 1920 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. The cause of death was uremia secondary to chronic prostatitis. He was buried on 3 Sep 1920 in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

Urban married Clementine (Clemency) Wilcox daughter of Jesse B Wilcox and Elizabeth Russell on 15 May 1862 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. Clementine was born on 21 Dec 1830 in Franklin Co., KY. She died on 11 Jul 1894 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. She was buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

They had the following children:

43 F i. Pattie Russell Williams was born on 7 Jun 1865 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. She died on 18 Mar 1910 in Jefferson Co., KY. The cause of death was myocardiac degeneration, acc to death record. She was buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

+ 44 F ii. Minnie Imogene Williams was born on 7 Jun 1867. She died on 26 Aug 1888.

+ 45 M iii. John W R Williams was born on 11 Aug 1869. He died on 5 Jan 1948.


Fourth Generation

19. Mildred Carlton "Minnie" Williams (Jacob, David, Jesse) was born on 30 Jul 1856 in Bridgeport, Franklin Co., KY. She died on 16 Feb 1932 in Washington, DC. She was buried in Roselawn Memorial Park, Little Rock, AR.

Mildred married Josiah Hazen Shinn, son of Josiah Carlock Shinn and Elizabeth Frances Gilpin on 17 Jan 1875 in Bridgeport, Franklin Co, Kentucky. Josiah was born on 29 Mar 1849 in Russellville, Pope County, Arkansas. He died on 2 Sep 1917 in Washington DC. He was re-buried in Roselawn Memorial Park, Little Rock, AR.

They had the following children:

46 F i. Grace Electra Shinn was born on 9 Oct 1875 in Bridgeport, Franklin Co, Kentucky. She died on 23 Oct 1885 in Russellville, Pope County, Arkansas. The cause of death was typhoid fever. She was buried in Oakland Cemetery, Russellville, Pope Co., AR.

47 M ii. Joseph Roy Longworth Shinn was born on 18 Mar 1880 in Bridgeport, Franklin Co, Kentucky. He died on 13 Feb 1930 in Washington, DC.
Joseph married Maud A MNU in 1910/1920 in Washington DC. Maud was born in 1885 in Kentucky.

20. Margaret Letcher Williams (Jacob, David, Jesse) was born on 8 Mar 1861 in KY. She died on 19 Jul 1922 in Benton Co., AR. She was buried in Bentonville Cemetery, Bentonville, Benton Co., AR.

Margaret married James Webster Wells, son of Hugh S Wells and Paulina Shinn on 2 Jan 1885 in House of J H Shinn, Russellville, Pope Co., AR. James was born on 10 Feb 1854 in Bentonville, AR. He died on 28 Jun 1931 in Benton Co., AR. He was buried in Bentonville Cemetery, Bentonville, Benton Co., AR.

They had the following children:

48 M i. Hugh Desha Wells was born on 3 Jul 1886 in Arkansas. He died in 1920 in Benton Co., AR. He was buried in Bentonville Cemetery, Bentonville, Benton Co., AR.
Hugh married Minnie Garden . Minnie was born in 1889 in Arkansas.

49 M ii. Homer Franklin Wells was born on 18 Jun 1888 in Arkansas. He died on 1 May 1953 in Kansas. He was buried on 6 May 1953 in Ft Leavenworth National Cem, Ft Leavenworth, KS.
Homer married Eula D MNU . Eula was born in 1897 in Arkansas.

50 M iii. Meta Carlton Wells was born in Jul 1890 in Arkansas.

51 F iv. Grace Pauline Wells was born in May 1892 in Arkansas. She died in 1912 in Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR. She was buried in Bentonville Cemetery, Bentonville, Benton Co., AR.

52 M v. Raymond Wyatt "Jack" Wells was born on 25 Nov 1895 in Arkansas. He died on 17 Sep 1972 in Benton Co., AR. He was buried in Bentonville Cemetery, Bentonville, Benton Co., AR.
Raymond married Olivia Adele MNU in 1925. Olivia was born on 4 Dec 1890 in Illinois. She died on 17 Jun 1967 in Benton Co., AR. She was buried in Bentonville Cemetery, Bentonville, Benton Co., AR.

22. Jo Desha Williams (Jacob, David, Jesse) was born on 12 May 1866 in Bridgeport, Franklin Co, Kentucky. He died on 23 Dec 1950 in Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR. He was buried on 26 Dec 1950 in Roselawn Memorial Park, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR.

Jo married Maxie Leah Meek, daughter of James Alexander Meek and Mary Emily Conner on 11 Feb 1886 in Russellville, Pope Co., AR. Maxie was born on 10 Feb 1869 in Grenada, Grenada Co., MS. She died on 29 Apr 1955 in Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR. She was buried in Roselawn Cemetery, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR.

They had the following children:

53 F i. Mildred Imogene Williams was born on 27 Jan 1890 in Russellville, Pope Co., AR. She died on 28 Jan 1890 in Russellville, Pope Co., AR. She was buried in Oakland Cemetery, Russellville, Pope Co., AR.

54 M ii. Cedric Hazen Williams was born on 29 Jun 1892 in Pope Co., AR. He died on 23 Aug 1951 in Crosbyton, Crosby Co., TX. The cause of death was suicide. He was buried in Roselawn Cemetery, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR.
Cedric married (1) Kathleen Kilgore daughter of Jefferson Davis Kilgore and Cassie L MNU on 14 Jul 1915 in Butler Co., MO. Kathleen was born in 1892 in Missouri.
Cedric married (2) Clara Crowe .

55 M iii. Paul Meek Williams was born on 24 Dec 1894 in Pope Co., AR. He died in Feb 1979 in Saline Co., AR. He was buried in Pinecrest Memorial Park, Alexander, Saline Co., AR.
Paul married Ruth I MNU . Ruth was born on 19 Oct 1894 in Pope Co., AR. She died in Aug 1982 in Saline Co., AR. She was buried in Pinecrest Memorial Park, Alexander, Saline Co., AR.

56 F iv. Katherine Leah Williams was born on 18 Jul 1899 in Arkansas. She died on

8 Dec 1904 in Russellville, Pope County, AR. She was buried in Oakland Cemetery Russellville, Pope County, AR.

57 M v. Jo Duffie Williams was born on 11 Jun 1903 in Arkansas. He died on 3 Jul 1970 in Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR. He was buried in Roselawn Memorial Park, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR.
Jo married Doris Geneva Balding, daughter of Victor Claude Balding and Hattie Belle Chapin on 31 Oct 1926 in Saline Co., AR. Doris was born on 9 Jul 1907 in Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR. She died on 18 Jan 1998 in Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR. She was buried on 21 Jan 1998 in Roselawn Memorial Park, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR.

25. Ella J Neat (Hettie Rowe Williams, David, Jesse) was born in 1846 in Franklin Co., KY.

Ella married Emory L Ford son of John B Ford and Mary MNU on 4 Sep 1866 in Floyd Co., IN. Emory was born in 1847 in Indiana.

They had the following children:

58 F i. Hettie Ford was born in 1867 in Indiana.

59 F ii. Nettie Ford was born in 1872 in Indiana.

60 M iii. Leydon Ford was born in 1876 in Indiana.

61 F iv. Stella Ford was born in 1879 in Indiana.

26. Addis Emmet Neat (Hettie Rowe Williams, David, Jesse) was born in May 1851 in Franklin Co., KY. He died on 5 Sep 1904 in New Albany, Floyd Co., IN.

Addis married Sophia B Ashton on 28 May 1874 in Floyd Co., IN. Sophia was born in May 1854 in Indiana.

They had the following children:

62 F i. Nancy Neat was born in Jan 1877 in Floyd Co., IN.

63 F ii. Hollie Neat was born in May 1883 in Floyd Co., IN.

64 M iii. Addis Neat Jr was born in Apr 1895 in Floyd Co., IN.

27. Benjamin Crittenden Neat (Hettie Rowe Williams, David, Jesse) was born on 29 Aug 1856 in Franklin Co., KY. He died on 12 Feb 1919 in Louisville, Jefferson Co., KY. The cause of death was fatty degeneration of the heart, per death certificate. He was buried on 14 Feb 1919 in New Albany, Floyd Co., IN.

Benjamin married (1) Ellen MNU in 1884. Ellen was born in Apr 1858 in Ohio.


Benjamin and Ellen had the following children:

65 M i. Benjamin Crittenden Neat Jr was born on 1 Nov 1888 in New Albany, Floyd Co., IN.


Benjamin married (2) Anna H Jackson on 15 Jul 1903 in Floyd Co., IN. Anna was born in 1874 in Indiana.

They had the following children:

66 F ii. Dorothy Neat was born in 1904 in Floyd Co., IN.

67 M iii. Frank W Neat was born in 1907 in Floyd Co., IN.

68 M iv. Leyden R Neat was born in 1909 in Floyd Co., IN.

69 F v. Laura Neat was born in 1909 in Floyd Co., IN.

28. Estelle A Neat (Hettie Rowe Williams, David, Jesse) was born on 31 Jul 1859 in Kentucky. She died after 1910 in New Albany, Floyd Co., IN.

Estelle married (1) Miles Frank Brinkley on 30 Nov 1881 in Floyd Co., IN. Miles was born in Jan 1848 in Kentucky. He died in 1909.

They had the following children:

70 M i. Benjamin H Brinkley was born in May 1882 in Floyd Co., IN. He died on 18 Dec 1906 in Denver, Denver Co., CO.


Estelle married (2) Harry C Doughty on 10 Feb 1910 in Floyd Co., IN. Harry was born in 1858 in Indiana.

29. David Owen Robinson (Elizabeth (Bettie) G Williams, David, Jesse) was born on 25 Jul 1848 in Franklin Co., KY. He died on 16 Nov 1926 in Franklin Co., KY. The cause of death was chronic valvular heart disease per death certificate. He was buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

David married Edmonia Hopper . Edmonia was born on 8 Feb 1857 in Franklin Co., KY. She died on 21 Nov 1938 in Franklin Co., KY. She was buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

They had the following children:

71 F i. Jessie Robinson was born on 31 Dec 1880 in Franklin Co., KY. She died on 4 Mar 1896 in Franklin Co., KY. She was buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

72 M ii. George Barnes Robinson was born on 18 Jun 1882 in Franklin Co., KY. He died on 13 Feb 1903 in Franklin Co., KY. He was buried in Frankfort

Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

73 M iii. John D Robinson was born in 1890 in Franklin Co., KY.

30. Joseph Austin Robinson (Elizabeth (Bettie) G Williams, David, Jesse) was born on 26 Oct 1850 in Franklin Co., KY. He died on 14 Jun 1914 in Franklin Co., KY. He was buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

Joseph married Caroline Steele Hawkins on 15 Jan 1879 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. Caroline was born on 16 Aug 1848 in Woodford Co., KY. She died on 22 Apr 1931 in Franklin Co., KY. She was buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

They had the following children:

74 M i. Jeptha Thomas Robinson was born on 5 Sep 1880 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. He died on 5 Oct 1932 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. He was buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.
Jeptha married Mary Alice Snow on 27 Nov 1926 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. Mary was born on 31 Oct 1895 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. She died on 28 May 1963 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. She was buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

36. Jacob Urban Robinson (Elizabeth (Bettie) G Williams, David, Jesse) was born in Jun 1864 in Franklin Co., KY.

Jacob married Jennie (Annie) MNU in 1895 in Illinois. Jennie was born in Jan 1866 in Illinois.

They had the following children:

75 M i. George V Robinson was born in Apr 1896 in Illinois.
George married Barbara N MNU in 1924 in Illinois. Barbara was born in 1895 in Illinois.

44. Minnie Imogene Williams (Urban Valentine, David, Jesse) was born on 7 Jun 1867 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. She died on 26 Aug 1888 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. She was buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

She had the following children:

76 M i. Unnamed Infant Williams was born on 26 Aug 1888 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. He died on 26 Aug 1888 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. He was buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

45. John W R Williams (Urban Valentine, David, Jesse) was born on 11 Aug 1869 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. He died on 5 Jan 1948 in Franklin Co, KY. The cause of death was
uremia due to hyperplasic prostate, per death certificate. He was buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

John married Susan Morris in 1894 in Franklin Co, KY. Susan was born on 25 Apr 1871 in Kentucky. She died on 22 Feb 1954 in Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY. She was buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

They had the following children:

77 F i. Alice T Williams was born in Nov 1897 in Franklin Co, KY.
As always, I'm interested in closing any gaps.

So cousins, feel free to contact me.
dee_burris: (Default)
Sunday, April 22nd, 2012 11:34 am
Browsing the 1940 census, and found my great-great grandparents, Jo and Maxie Williams, living at 2310 S Ringo in Little Rock.

This house...
Photobucket

With them was a 76 year old widow, Belle Webb.

Grandma Maxie said Belle was living there on 1 Apr 1935. So Belle was a long time lodger.

I looked in the 1940 Polks Directory for Little Rock. Belle Webb, widow of John T., was listed at 2310 S Ringo.

Now I am very curious.

Maxie's mother, Mary Emily Conner, married Samuel Webb, just two weeks after she divorced Maxie's father in 1871.

I'll have to look for the connection to John T Webb...
dee_burris: (Default)
Sunday, February 5th, 2012 09:23 am
Last night, I had another one of those moments.

The one where you are looking for one thing, find another, exclaim over it, and then spend the next - in my case - two and one half hours engrossed in something else altogether.

~The genealogy ADD kicked in again.~
In my den, I have this bookcase.

Photobucket


It is deep enough to stack rows of books two deep. I also keep some files in there. One of my shrines is on top of it.

I went into it to clean out some previous years' tax returns.

As I was digging around, and giving things a good dusting at the same time, my half hour project blew up on me.

Because I found a very well-wrapped, astonishingly heavy parcel slumbering in the back recesses of the bookcase.

I took the parcel over to my coffee-table sized footstool and unwrapped it.

It was the Williams family Bible - the one I said DID NOT exist in this post.

Apparently, I wrapped it up in 1998, stowed it in the nether regions of the bookcase, and forgot about it.Maybe I forgot because of the condition of the Bible.

It was coming apart in chunks. The covers had detached themselves from themselves from the chunks of pages decades ago.

I went for the middle - and hit pay dirt.
The Bible was given to Maxie Leah Meek and Jo Desha Williams by Maxie's mother, Mary Emily (Conner) Meek Webb, for Christmas in 1890.

Photobucket


Maxie had immediate entries to write in it. Her marriage to Jo Desha Williams on 11 Feb 1886.
Photobucket


The first death since their marriage - that of their one day old daughter, Mildred Imogene, on 28 Jan 1890...
Photobucket


It was from that page that I found the date, although not the place, of death for Jo's brother, Lucien Eugene Williams, on 27 Dec 1900.

I loved the birth page...it has the undated news clippings of the arrivals of some huge Williams babies.
Photobucket


At his birth, Cedric Hazen Williams weighed a hefty ten pounds.

Paul Meek Williams, born on Christmas Eve 1894, weighed in at ten and a half pounds.

And omigosh...My grandfather, Jo Duffie Williams, weighed twelve pounds.
Photobucket


No wonder Maxie was done after Jo...
LC, you were right.

Cousins, right click and save...
dee_burris: (Default)
Sunday, January 1st, 2012 08:18 am
Mrs. Maxie L M Williams, Widow of J D Williams, Sr.

Mrs. Maxie Leah Meek Williams, aged 86, of 2310 Ringo street, widow of Joe D Williams, Sr., died Friday at her home. She was a member of the First Christian church and Little Rock Chapter of United Daughters of Confederacy. Suvivors include two sons, P M and Joe D Williams, both of Little Rock. Funeral will be at 2:30 p.m. Saturday at Griffin-Leggett by Rev. Marion A Boggs. Pallbearers will be Leon A Boggs, Walter N Brandon, Joe N Dillard, Harry Shoppoch, Milton Osborn and Joe Caldwell. Burial will be at Roselawn Memorial Park.
Published on Saturday, 30 Apr 1955, in the Arkansas Gazette
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Saturday, December 17th, 2011 09:54 am
An excellent source of genealogical information for researchers of the Guy Meek family is a book written by Melton P Meek, Vol 2, Guy Meek Family, Descendants. It was digitized by Brigham Young University and is available on their website.

On page 569 of the book, I found a letter written in 1983 by Joe Thomas Meek to Melton P Meek, providing Melton Meek - and me - with some more insight into my Meek family, particularly what appears to be the the complete and total estrangement of my great-great grandparents, James Alexander Meek and Mary Emily Conner, after their divorce in 1871.

LETTER FROM JOE THOMAS MEEK, CORRESPONDENT, 4 Dec 1983.

That is in America. We found the old grave of SAMUEL MEEK,
brother to ALEXANDER (Samuel, forebear of Dr. Rider). We
went to Alexander's grave and found a cow scratching on the
Italian marble stone and raked a hundred years & more debris
from the old stones.

We found the graves of old JEFFERSON J. and HETTIE at old
Sardis (MS) and that of GREAT Grandfather JAMES at Oxford (MS).

None of the family ever saw old JAMES after 1868, when he
and great grandmother parted.

None of the family can ever be named JAMES or ALEXANDER
again, as my grandfather promised. An old lady at Oxford
gave us his picture, a little old man with the other old soldiers
in front of the old CourtHouse at Oxford in 1911.
I had it put in a nice frame to hang in my father's room
besides his favorite picture of his old grandmother, but he
would not have it. The Irish have long, long memories and
never forget any wrong, however remote.

Now I am the last of my family, glad to have come and unafraid
to go, but no one remains to carry on this history,
this tradition.

So, Dr. Meek, if you like it, here's several pages written
on a dull, wintry day to add to your collection. Shakespeare
said "What assurance against the ravages of time except to
breed". Another famous writer one commented "I wrote it all
so that I wouldn't utterly perish." And so will I, if you
will put it in the ringed notebooks and add it to your 30
feet of shelving.

Now for a good meal, and a long winter's nap.

Yours Truly, Joe T. Meek

...glad to have come and unafraid to go...

Would that we all felt that way.

Joe Thomas Meek was born 5 Oct 1928 in Pope Co., AR, and died there in 1987.
Tags:
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Sunday, October 16th, 2011 04:58 pm
A probable Meek cousin, from some of my entries at Find a Grave...

A for real second cousin of the Burris kind, whom I'll get to meet in person on October 28, when we rendezvous at a gas station at the Atkins exit of Interstate 40, on our way to St. Joe Cemetery...

And bless his soul...a cousin several times removed, who found my online tree and is now catching up on the 140 year old Burris secret after emailing me to ask if I knew who his grandfather's father was...His grandfather was James L Hill.
If you've been putting your family history out on the internet and are wondering if it's worth all the time and effort you've put into it...

Let me assure you, it is.
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Monday, September 12th, 2011 07:48 pm
Every once in a while, I find someone outside my direct line of descendancy whose story tugs at my heart and cries out to be told.

Such is the case with Joedella Meek, daughter of Joseph Alexander Meek and Madella Rossell.

Joedella's dad lost his parents when he was only 20, and I found him in the 1850 census, living with my 3rd great-parents, Jefferson John Meek and Hettie Donahoo in the 1850 census in Marshall Co., MS.

So I followed him for a while.
Joedella was J A Meek's only living child from either of his two marriages.

He married her mother (his first wife), Madella Russell on 19 Nov 1856 in DeSoto Co., MS.

Madella died when her daughter was just a toddler, on 12 Aug 1860, and J A Meek married again, to Caroline Frances Parker, in 1861.

By 1874, J A Meek moved his family to Craighead County, AR, where he was a physician in the city of Jonesboro. It was there that Joedella married William Monroe Robertson on 3 Oct 1886. She was his second wife.

Monroe, as he was called, was a City Marshall and well respected in Jonesboro. The couple had two children Myrtle, born in July 1887, and Monroe, Jr., born in February 1889.

Joedella probably did not even realize she was pregnant with her third child, Della, when tragedy struck her family.

A VERY SAD ACCIDENT

SUDDEN DEATH OF W M ROBERTSON, OF JONESBORO

The Careless Handling of a Pistol, Believed to be Empty, the Source of His Death -


Special to the Arkansas Gazette.

Jonesboro, August 30 - A most distressing accident occurred here last night about 11 o'clock, which resulted in the death of City Marshall W M Robertson. He and a friend, Ed Daberry, were playing with a revolver thought not to be loaded. Daberry took the weapon and had slapped it several times, when suddenly it fired, the ball taking effect near the head of Robertson, from the effects of which he died in a very few minutes. Mr. Robertson had lived here nearly all his life, and had many friends, who are sad today over his untimely death. He was a prominent member of the Masonic Order, being a Knight Templar, by which order he will be buried tomorrow. His death was entirely accidental, and no blame is attached to anyone.
Source: Jonesboro Evening Sun, 30 Aug 1891

Monroe Robertson, Sr. was 38 years old. His widow was 33, with two small children to raise, and another on the way.

So she ran a boardinghouse. The 1900 and 1910 censuses show she was doing a pretty good business.

In 1906, Joedella's step-mother, Carrie Meek - the only mother she had really ever known - died. In addition to her boardinghouse duties, Joedella must have had some responsibility for nursing her ailing mother, as the Jonesboro Daily Times-Enterprise described:

MRS J A MEEK DEAD

After a Long Illness, Mrs. Meek Passed Away Last Night


Last night at 7:40 o'clock, Mrs. Carrie F Meek died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Jodella Robertson, on Monroe Avenue.

The death of this good woman was not a surprise, as she had been ill for several weeks, and it had been thought for some time that the end might come at any moment. Even though this being the case, her loved ones and friends are deeply grieved.

Mrs. Meek was 74 years of age, and has been married to her husband for forty-six years. She was a devoted wife and a splendid christian woman. Besides her husband, she leaves a step-daughter, Mrs. Robertson, and many friends to mourn her loss.

Mrs. Meek has resided in Jonesboro since 1874, and by her gentle and lovable disposition, has made many strong and lasting friends. She was for years a consistent member of the Methodist church, and has been, ever since her residence in Jonesboro, a member of the First church of this city.

The funeral occurred this afternoon at the church, the services being conducted by her pastor, Rev. W. C. Davidson. To the aged husband and other relatives and friends, the Times-Enterprise offers sympathy.
Source: Jonesboro Daily Times-Enterprise, 10 Dec 1906

Joedella lost her father two months later, in February 1907.
I didn't find Joedella in the 1920 census. In 1930, she still had boarders, but was living in Riverside County, CA. I wonder if she moved there after her profound loss in 1918.

MONROE ROBERTSON DEAD

Monroe Robertson, son of Mrs. Jodella Robertson of this city, died of influenza Thursday at the State Hospital in Little Rock. The remains arrived in this city yesterday accompanied by his mother, who was with him at the time of his death, and his half-brother, Ed Robertson. The funeral was held at the family residence on Flint and Elm yesterday at 3 o'clock, conducted by Dr. J R Hobbs, pastor of the First Baptist church. Interment was at the City cemetery. Many beautiful floral offerings covered the casket. The deceased is survived by his mother, brother and two sisters, Miss Della Robertson, and Mrs. Myrtle Adams.
Source: Jonesboro Evening Sun, 11 Nov 1918

I cannot imagine watching my child die. And then having to accompany his body back home for burial.

And through it all, Joedella remembered her manners.

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our many friends for their kindness after the death of our dear son and brother. Also for the beautiful floral offerings.

Mrs. Joedella Robertson
Mrs. Myrtle R Adams
Della Robertson
R E Robertson
Source: Jonesboro Evening Sun, 13 Nov 1918
The next historic record I could find on Joedella was the California Death Index.

She died in Riverside County on Independence Day, 1959.

She was 101 years old.

I hope her later years brought her joy.
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Sunday, September 11th, 2011 12:18 pm
I've spent all morning with the Flip-Pal scanner, and my copy of Dressed for the Photographer, as well as the notes and research on my Meek family.

I have written before about my exasperation with my great grandmother, Maxie Leah (Meek) Williams, who was a consumate collector of photographs, but who hardly ever labeled them.

And it only took a little while after I inherited the photo album, begun in 1885, to realize that Maxie had squirreled away older photos between its leather covered wooden covers.

Which were also not labeled.

This morning I focused on the tintypes, because there were quite a few that had been taken in one photo session, and in the same location.
All these tintypes, which are of the heavier weight, bear marks of having been at one time encased in a paper folder, as was common to make it easy to mail them.

Tintypes came into common use beginning in 1856, so these photos could not have been taken before then. For several reasons, I am dating them between 1857 and the end of 1861, i.e., style of dress and hairstyle, composition of the family members for whom I have made definite and tentative identification, and the wholehearted participation of the Jefferson John Meek family in the Confederate States of America, beginning on 27 Mar 1862, when the Reverend Captain J J Meek started his very own CSA unit in Panola Co., MS.

I'm leaning toward sometime in 1861 as the actual date of the photos.
Since I knew these tintypes pre-dated the official "beginning" of the photo album at Christmas 1885, I had to figure out who these folks were who were obviously important to Maxie Leah Meek.

They could have been members of her mother's or father's family.

I looked first at the family of Mary Emily Conner, who was born in 1837 in DeSoto County, MS.

Mary had fair hair, as did her younger brother, James Alfred Conner. Most of these folks had dark hair, like Maxie's. There were not enough boys in Mary's family for these folks to be Conners.

So I looked at Maxie's father, James Alexander Meek. The apparent ages of the people in the tintypes fit fairly well with the Meeks.

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I think the people in the photo above are Jefferson John Meek, his wife Henrietta "Hettie" (Donahoo) Meek, and their youngest child, Virginia Tennessee Meek, who was born 15 Jan 1859.

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I think this is a photo of my great great grandfather, James Alexander Meek, and was probably taken because he and his father had decided to fully invest themselves in fighting for the Confederacy during the Civil War. I think that reason may have been the impetus for all of these photos, because who knew who would be around at the end of the thing?


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I think this is Robert D Meek, younger brother of James Alexander. There was a brother between them - William McEwen Meek - but he died at the age of 5 in 1843, and was buried in the family cemetery in Laws Hill, MS. If this is Robert, he didn't live long after this photo was taken, as he died in a Confederate POW camp in Alton, IL of smallpox on 16 Jun 1863.


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I think this is Permelia Frances "Fanny" Meek. She had an older sister, Martha Bolton Meek, who died at the age of 17 in 1857, and I think these photos were taken after Martha's death.


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I think this is either John G Meek (born in 1849), or Thomas Jefferson Meek (born 3 Jan 1850).


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I think this may be Malsey K Meek, born in 1845.


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I think this may be Lucy A Meek, born in 1847.


I feel less certain about the last two photos, because if they were taken in 1861, those girls don't look old enough to me to be Malsey and Lucy. I am almost certain I have accounted for all of the children of Jefferson John Meek and Henrietta Donahoo - so there aren't other possibilities.
I'd love for some other Meek researcher with photos to get in touch with me...

And I believe I'm going to shell out some cash to get a custom mat for these tintypes and frame them all together.
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Monday, August 15th, 2011 07:54 pm
Ora Lee Settle was the first wife of my great grand uncle, William Thaddeus Meek. She was the daughter of Willis Franklin Settle and Betsey A White, born on 6 May 1866 in Barren Co., KY.

Lee, as she was called, married William Thaddeus Meek on 18 Nov 1885 in Russellville, Pope Co., AR, where Thaddeus was living after his mother, Mary Emily Conner divorced his father and remarried a man named Samuel Webb, all in the space of 16 days in October 1871.

The Webbs moved to Russellville with Mary's children, Maxie and Thaddeus.

I knew Lee died young, but until I found her death notice in the Russellville Democrat while I was at the Arkansas History Commission today, I had no idea of the circumstances surrounding her death - which was very sudden.

The Russellville Democrat, 18 May 1893:
The death of Mrs. W. T. Meek which took place last Saturday afternoon was one of the saddest that ever occurred in this city. She died at home alone, from cause unknown, but supposed to be some heart trouble, between one and two o'clock and the discovery of the fact was not made until 6 o'clock when Mrs. Patrick, a neighbor, happened to call and found her lifeless body on the floor of her dressing apartment. Her husband left her at the dinner hour apparently in good health and excellent spirits. She spoke to him of feeling better than [illegible] intention to visit the homes of her friends during the afternoon. From the surroundings of the death chamber it is evident that she was preparing to make those calls when the dread summons came. That her death was sudden and painless is evidenced by the fact that her eyes were closed and her face wore a calm expression as if in gentle slumber.

Heartrending, always, is a death like this. But there is this consolation to the stricken husband and two little children, relatives and friends, the memory of a life so noble, so self-sacrificing, so worthy of emulation in every way will remain forever an inspiration and a benediction.

Services were held Sunday afternoon at the family residence by Eld. G W Harkey, who preached a touching funeral sermon. Afterward the remains were taken to the city cemetery for interment followed by a large number of friends and relatives.

To the husband and family who are heart-broken the most profound and sincere sympathy of the entire community is tendered.


Ora Lee (Settle) Meek died 13 May 1893, and was buried at Oakland Cemetery, in Russellville, Pope Co., AR.
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Saturday, April 16th, 2011 01:16 pm
Being unwilling to continue to tear my hair out to at least date these unlabeled photos, I was very intrigued by this post in Katherine's blog, Atlantic Roots.

So I ordered my very own copy of Dressed for the Photographer: Ordinary Americans and Fashion, 1840-1900, by Joan Severa.

It arrived yesterday.

So you know how I spent my Friday night.


I think I have much closer dates for two photos, after studying the photos in the book, as well as the excellent narrative Severa gives about other fashion clues, such as hairstyles.

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This is my great-grandmother, Maxie Leah (Meek) Williams. I'm going to date this photo about 1886 (she married on 11 Feb 1886) due to the rounded bodice of the dress, as well as the collar, and the hint of the bustle on the back of the dress.

Many bodices of this period had tight sleeves cut short on the forearm and featuring cuffs or half-cuffs. (Source: Dressed for the Photographer, at page 378.)

Severa goes on to say, In eighties photographs all bodices appear corset-fitted, many with very high standing collars. Similarly, sleeves are set very high, with the armscye cut somewhat in from the point of the shoulder in back, and are extremely tight... (Id., at page 379.)

There are also dating clues in the way she wore her hair. ...In the matter of coifure, the hair will be worn a good deal lower on the neck than it has been for some two seasons past...The style of dressing the front hair remains unchanged [in curled bangs]. (Id., at page 385.)


The puff sleeves on the dress and much shorter and tightly curled bangs make me think this photo was taken in the very late 1890's, and that theory is supported by the listing of the photographer, Jno H Ganner of Russellville, in the 1900 Arkansas Business Directory.

I believe this is still Maxie Leah, but do not have a clue as to the identity of her younger companion.

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This book is making a formerly dreaded chore much more fun.

This is a Sepia Saturday post.
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Saturday, April 9th, 2011 09:35 pm
In observance of the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Civil War on 12 Apr 1861, this blogging challenge was issued by Bill West, of West in New England.


As regular readers of this blog know, I am a southerner. I still live in the South.

It has been a common occurrence for me to find slave-owners in my family history. I refuse to glorify that word with whatever politically correct substitute phrasing is in vogue these days.

Some of my Southern ancestors - most notably my Callaway and Meek ancestors - bought and sold other human beings and treated them as their property. They willed some of those same human beings to their heirs, and fought for the right to keep on doing it.

Some others of my Southern ancestors didn't.

And the two sets of ancestors intermarried before, during and after the Civil War.

Must have made for some interesting dinner table discussions.

I have a many-times-removed Bowden cousin who is getting on in years, but who regularly sends me information about the Bowden line, even though there were relatively few Bowdens who married into my direct ancestral line. Where he feels it relevant, he tells me which ones fought in the War of Northern Aggression. I've told him I thought I recalled from my history books that the Confederates fired on Fort Sumter, not the other way around.

I definitely would have been one of those damned Yankees. The sight of the Confederate flag flying today sickens me, and makes me want to personally tear it down.

Because the good ole boys flying it have to know - don't they? - that the South ain't gonna rise again.

Not the way they want it to.
No matter which side they were on, there is ample evidence that the Civil War changed the lives of my ancestors.

In many cases, it ended it.

In two cases I know of, the war had to have divided families - with brother fighting against brother.

It could have been Samuel Ashmore's suggestion, but for some reason I think not...he and his youngest brother, Robert D. Ashmore, enlisted at the same time at Dover, AR on 20 Jun 1862, in the 35th Arkansas Infantry, Co I, fighting for the Confederate States of America. Robert was 19 years old. Samuel was 30.

By 8 Jan 1863, Robert apparently had enough. He went AWOL. Twenty days later, his big brother Samuel died in the service of the CSA. Robert "deserted to the enemy" on 10 Sep 1863, enlisting in the 4th Regiment, Arkansas Cavalry, Co. H, United States of America.

Robert came home, Samuel did not. I don't know where Samuel is buried.

Cynthia Ann Ashmore, the widow of John Burris, was probably lucky that she did not know the grief the war would vist on her household.

All three of her sons went off to war. Franklin Buchanan and John Crockett enlisted at Dover in the CSA, 35th Arkansas Infantry on 20 Jun 1862, with Franklin serving in Company H and John in Company I.

Her oldest son, William James Burris, fought for the USA in the 3rd Arkansas Cavalry, Co. A.

Franklin died first, on the White River on 28 Oct 1862. His brother, John, deserted on 24 Aug 1863.

William died of typhoid on 1 Aug 1864. He was buried in the National Cemetery in Little Rock.

I can't imagine that the family was able during wartime to visit his grave. I don't know where Franklin is buried.

And I wonder if Cynthia did.

The Brannon brothers, Benjamin and James, were Tennesseans by birth, but Yankees in their hearts, as was their father, John.

All three enlisted together on 15 Aug 1862 in the Arkansas 1st Cavalry Regiment, Company L at Springtown, AR in Washington County.

All three lived to tell about it, although James was discharged on 23 Nov 1863, with the surgeon saying his deafness had worsened during the war, and he had a lung disease. Benjamin was discharged on disability in August 1864.

All three lived out their lives in Benton County, AR, where James was a respected physician and merchant.


There was no question about the Rev. Jefferson John Meek's loyalty to the Confederacy. He had much to lose if the South did not win the war. In the decade between the 1850 and 1860 census, he had doubled the number of slaves he owned.

He created his own infantry unit at Panola Co., MS on 27 Mar 1862. It was the 42nd Regiment, Mississippi Infantry, and Rev. Meek became Captain of it. He was 52 years old.

Capt. J J Meek had two sons old enough to serve, James Alexander, and Robert. James served in his father's regiment. Robert and Capt. Meek's son-in-law, William Waldron, served in the 2nd Mississippi Rangers, Company K.

Capt. Meek considered the war our holy cause. However, according to his letter of resignation dated 5 Aug 1863, he had found out just how much that cause was costing him.

Excerpted from the letter:
My son in law and my two sons have perished in our holy cause and my now aged and infirm wife has been left with no male members of the family to provide and care for her...

He was right about his son-in-law, William Waldron, who died on 3 Jul 1863. Capt. Meek's son, Robert, died of smallpox a month earlier in a POW camp in Alton, IL.

And when he heard of James' wounding and capture during the Battle of Gettysburg on 8 Jul 1863, he probably had every reason to believe that he was dead, too.

But James survived and spent the remainder of the war in the POW camp for Confederate soldiers at Fort Delaware, on Pea Patch Island, until he signed his oath of allegiance to the United States and was released on 11 Jun 1865.

Then he came back home to Mississippi to his wife and son, buried an infant daughter in 1867, had another daughter, and his marriage fell apart.

The Civil War nearly bankrupted his father.

Virtually all of the Callaway men old enough to tote a gun served the Confederacy. Only recently, I discovered that my Callaway and Clark County Williams lines probably had their first interactions during the war, when Allen Mason Lowery Callaway and David Andrew Williams served together in the 10th Arkansas Cavalry Regiment, at least two years before either of them married the Dunn sisters, Martha and Mary.

There is very little available information about this regiment on the internet. From a cached website, you can find the following:
Newton turned command of the 5th Cavalry over to Colonel Thomas Morgan on December 24, 1863 (whereupon the regiment was renamed as Morgan's 2nd Arkansas Cavalry), and assumed command of a small cavalry brigade [Note: This "small calvary brigade" was the 10th Arkansas Cavalry] which he led for the remainder of the war. On January 14, 1865, Newton's brigade in company with the brigades of Colonels William H. Brooks and Ras Stirman conducted an attack on Union forces on the Arkansas River near Dardanelle, which was repulsed. They next chased a fleet of steamboats down the Arkansas River, ambushing and sinking several of them near Ivey's Ford. Following this campaign, the Confederate force returned to the stronghold of southwestern Arkansas where they stood mostly in defense or garrison duty until the surrender of the Confederate forces in the Trans-Mississippi on May 26, 1865. (Source: Archive Wayback)

And having now learned that, I wonder if Mace and David's Civil War service had anything to do with their very early deaths - Mace in 1877, and David in 1888.

Mace's father, Nathaniel C. Callaway, died in the service of the Confederacy of typhoid on 7 May 1862 in Shelby County, TN, when Mace was 15. Mace's mother, Julia Wingfield, was left with three children under the age of 10 to raise. Until I discovered last summer that Nathaniel was buried at Elmwood Cemetery in Memphis, I don't think anyone in the family knew. Nathaniel just went off to war, and never came home.

Mace's first cousin, Jonathan Wilson Callaway, survived the war, and as reported by Goodspeed,...His final surrender was made with the Confederate forces, at Shreveport, at the close of the war, in May, 1865, following which he walked the whole distance back to Arkadelphia. (Source: Goodspeed's Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Central Arkansas, (publ. 1889) at page 427)

Jonathan Wilson Callaway went on to be a fairly prominent political figure in Pulaski County, AR after the war, and died there in 1894. He is buried in Oakland Cemetery in Little Rock.

There is no question that the Civil War changed the lives of everyone who lived and died during that era in history, not the least of whom were the black Americans - slaves and free -who even after Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, still did not receive the full measure of their American citizenship until nearly a century later.

As I study and make continuous discoveries about my ancestors who lived during that time, I always wonder what made them choose the side they did, and how those choices affected the lives of their families and others around them.

I guess I'll ask them on the other side...
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Monday, January 31st, 2011 03:31 pm
SALE OF SLAVE AND LEGACY TO DAUGHTER: CHARLOTTE
FOR HER CARE, DATED: 19 May 1845.
Know all men by these present that I, Alexander Meek of Marshall County, State of Mississippi. In consideration of the natural love and affection which I have and bear toward my daughter Charlotte Meek of same County and state, and the affectionate care she has given me in my old age, and for the sum of one dollar by her to be paid, and by these I do bargain and sell to my daughter one negro slave (woman) named Harriet, about 17 years of age, and her infant child named Adeline and their increase, also one good horse, saddle and bridle, one cow and calf and half of all my household and kitchen furniture, and I hereby covenant to and with my daughter that if I depart this life without having set apart to her, the horse, cow, calf and kitchen furniture above conveyed is to be taken in full satisfaction of the claim to a distributive share of my estate, so as to leave the residue of my property to be devided (sic) amongst my other children.

In testimony thereof I set my seal
This May 19, 1845
Alexander Meek


The above was transcribed from Volume 2: Guy Meek Family, Descendants #36-#84, at page 413. Digitized at this website.

Alexander Meek was the son of Thomas (IV) and Virginia Ann Meek. Charlotte T Meek took care of her father after the death of her mother, Elizabeth Keys in 1841 until she married Samuel M Blocker on 24 Aug 1856. Charlotte's father died on 8 Sep 1857, after falling and breaking a hip while playing with his grandchildren at the home of his son, Jefferson John Meek.

Alexander Meek was buried in the Meek Family Cemetery, Laws Hill, Marshall Co., MS.
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Sunday, January 30th, 2011 09:15 am
Because of my southern roots, nearly all of my male ancestors in the 19th century fought for the Confederate States of America in the Civil War.

James Alexander Meek was one of them. He dutifully signed up in his daddy's unit, the 42 Mississippi Infantry, Co. I, on 28 Apr 1862 in his hometown of Sardis, Panola County, MS. His father, Jefferson J Meek, was the Captain of the 42 Miss. Infantry until his resignation on 5 Aug 1863.

According to the letter of resignation, Jefferson J Meek considered the Civil War "our holy cause."

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Nonetheless, he resigned.

I think it may have been because he realized just how much that "holy cause" was costing him...


Capt. Meek thought James was dead.

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My son in law and my two sons have perished in our holy cause and my now aged and infirm wife has been left with no male members of the family to provide and care for her...

He was right about his son-in-law, William Waldron, who died on 3 Jul 1863. Capt. Meek's son, Robert, died of smallpox a month earlier in a POW camp in Alton, IL.

And when he heard of James' wounding and capture during the Battle of Gettysburg on 8 Jul 1863, he probably had every reason to believe that he was dead, too.

James may have wished he was dead.


James was sent to the POW camp at Fort Delaware, on Pea Patch Island. Most Confederate soldiers captured during the Battle of Gettysburg were imprisoned there. By August 1863, there were 11,000 prisoners there. By the end of the war, that number had swelled to 33,000. About 2,400 prisoners died at Fort Delaware.

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Photo from Library of Congress


Family lore has always contained rumors that James was required to catch and eat rats to survive during his imprisonment. I wondered about that until I read excerpts of Capt. John S Swann's imprisonment at Fort Delaware. (See excerpts of the document, here.)

...On the raised plank walkway seperating (sic) the two prisons the sargeant (sic) or some other would often appear and call out, "Money or boxes." He would then, when the prisoners came around, give out the names listed and either give them a memorandum of what he had for them, or take them through the gateway etc. These calls were termed "Money calls or box calls" as the case might be. In the banks of the ditches and under the plank walkway were rat holes and numbers of rats. The sargeant (sic) or some one would come around often with a squad of men with force pumps and hose and rat tarriers, sticks etc. The hose would be put in the rat holes, the force pump applied and the rats would run out and be killed. Numbers were sometimes caught in this way. When money or boxes were to be delivered you could hear all over the prison yard "Money call or box call" (I will say comparatively few ever heard this call for themselves.) Not long after my arrival I heard a cry "Rat call! Rat call!" I went out to see what this meant. A number of prisoners were moving and some running up near the partition, over which a sargeant (sic) was standing and presently he began throwing rats down. The prisoners scrambled for the rats like school boys for apples, none but some of the most needy prisoners, and the needy were the large majority, would scramble for these rats. Of course but few were lucky enough to get a rat. The rats were cleaned, put in salt water a while and fried. Their flesh was tender and not unpleasant to the taste.

When you are hungry, you think about food all the time, as illustrated by Capt. Swann's memory:

...On the next morning I found myself very hungry. I was up early and walked around the prison grounds observing and hearing what I could. Presently a bell or something I forget what, gave the breakfast signal. We formed in line and marched to the mess hall, in which were several long rows of plank tables with pieces of bread and meat arranged along the sides at intervales (sic) of some two feet. When we were in place each prisoner took one ration. The bread was made of rye and wheat flour, well cooked, but the piece very small, about half enough for a well man. The meat a small chunk of beef. Occasionally all sinew or mostly bone. It was cut up very carelessly and very small, not half a ration. Some days the bread was substituted with crackers, and these were hard days on us. We were permitted to take these rations to our bunks. I ate mine but remained very hungry. When dinner came the same thing was repeated, except there was occasionally a tin cup of what was called corn soup very tasteless and insipid, with little or no grease.

By next day I was ravenously hungry and so continued as did all who had no money or tobacco, untill (sic) I got the means to buy from the sutler. No one can immagine (sic) the effect of continuous hunger who has not experienced it, judging of others by its effects on me, and when it continues with no hopes of relief its effects are very demoralizing and the man is ready for almost anything. He thinks about eating all day and all sorts of devices to get food come into his mind. All night his dreams are most singular and sometimes fascinating about food and feasting. Every thing he has ever eaten, dinner parties, suppers, girls bearing flowers and fruit, his boyhood scenes at hog killings such as frying liver etc. and whatever food he has ever seen or eaten comes vividly before his disturbed senses, and he sometimes awakens dazed and half conscious that it was but a dream.



At the war's end, many Confederate POWs at Fort Delaware refused to believe the CSA had lost the war and that all who were willing to sign an Oath of Allegiance to the United States of America would be restored to full citizenship. From Swann's text:

...Some did not believe we were conquered. They believed, or rather persuaded themselves to believe, that the bulk of the army had gone off in squads and was not captured, and would re-form somewhere. That Johnston would soon be in the field with an army. That our soldiers would come to it in thousands, and began to take courage. But most of us gave up the Cause as lost. I did not at any time talk to any one that came into the prison grounds. But some did. Each Division had a chief who occasionally went outside, as we termed it, for one or another purpose. They noted a very different bearing towards them. A different everything all around them: recognition of citizenship, as it were. This they reported to us. The sentinels were now familiar. Seemed as if they thought the war was over; talked to us a little, and kindly. Their very looks were kindly. We saw manifestations of kindness everywhere. Feelings of forgiveness were rapidly growing. The sutler was ready to take orders for anything we wanted and send for them, clothing, shoes etc. It was rumored that all willing to take the oath of allegiance would be released, provided with necessary things, and sent home, by the Government. That such was the purpose of Mr. Lincoln, and General Grant we did not doubt. We thought this was dictated by a generous kindness and designed to save us from humiliation and mortification, by making us citizens at once if we wished to become so; and that the Federal Government thought the war was over. We did not think such an offer would be made unless Grant and Lincoln thought the war over. It would have been an insult, and we knew these men were wholly incapable of insulting us in prison. These things had a powerful effect on us. We felt that the generosity of Grant and Lincoln had silenced Stanton, Johnson, Stevenson and such, and this was true, beyond doubt. There are some things better learned from general appearances than from words. Words may deceive, but there is something eloquent, and unmistakable in the language of the countenance. Perhaps the language of the angels; and this was all around us.


James Alexander Meek signed the Oath of Allegiance, and was released from Fort Delaware on 11 Jun 1865 as documented in his Civil War service record (accessed at Footnote on 17 Jan 2011).

Photobucket


He returned home to Mississippi, and to his wife and son. He and Mary divorced in 1871, following the birth of two daughters, and death of one.

James died on 28 Nov 19181917*, and was buried beside his second wife, Mary Ann Linder, in Oxford Memorial Cemetery in Oxford, Lafayette Co., MS.

ETA: On 31 Oct 2012, I received a copy of James' death certificate in the mail from the State of Mississippi. It lists his date of death as 28 Nov 1917, date of burial as 29 Nov 1917, and says that he died of "debility from old age," secondary to a cold.
dee_burris: (Default)
Monday, January 17th, 2011 09:53 am
I found Mary Emily Conner's parents and siblings.

This was a seven year brick wall. And as so often happens, I had to go back and look at records I already had.

The 1900 census...in Russellville, Pope Co., AR.

Mary was a 62 year old widow. Her son and daughter were married and lived with their families in Pope Co. In that census, her 22 year old nephew, Curtis Conner, lived with her.

Only the enumerator had listed him as Conner Curtis, and for seven years, I just blew by that.


So it was on to discover who Curtis' father was, because he had to be Mary's brother.

And he was.

I found a lone family tree at Ancestry that was heavily sourced with lots of details about James Alfred Conner, Mary's older brother. Mary was in the tree, but the tree's owner didn't know anything about her, or many of the other siblings.

There's a photograph of their mother on that tree, in addition to lots of information about James Conner. James served in the Civil War, and I just spent about an hour on Footnote, reviewing muster roll and other military records on him. When he enlisted at Sardis, MS, he was enrolled by Capt. Jefferson John Meek, Mary's father-in-law.

I've contacted the owner of the tree, and offered the information, including photos that I have of Mary.


I just love it when this happens.
dee_burris: (Default)
Thursday, December 16th, 2010 09:18 pm
Photobucket


It's another of the undated and unlabeled photos from the Williams family photo album.

If it's around 1870-1875, then I think it's probably a photo of the millinery shop that Mary Emily (Conner) Meek owned in Grenada County, MS.

If not, then I have no idea...
dee_burris: (Default)
Friday, December 10th, 2010 06:24 pm
Monday, 11 Dec 1961...

That's the day my younger sister was born.

I was told that - at first - I was quite excited to be a "big sister."

But the new wore off, and when she was a few weeks old, I asked if we could take her back to the hospital.

Sis shares the same birthday with the following people in our family tree:
Frances Adelaide "Fanny" Ashmore - 1879
Charlie W Baker - 1882
Elizabeth Buck - 1868
Seth Chapin - 1733
Gilbert J Duelmer - 1932
Homer M Francis - 1896
Hans Devauld Funderburk - 1724
Charleen Herrington - 1946
Lena Belle Hobbs - 1880
Harriet Pauline Lee - 1848
Abner Meek - 1795
Leona V Potillo - 1910

Photobucket

My sis and me, Arkansas Democrat, 22 Dec 1963


I'm glad they didn't take you back, sissy.

Have a great birthday!