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dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, April 30th, 2014 06:15 am
Name: John Rush Johnson
Event Type: Marriage
Event Date (Formatted): 07 Sep 1957
Event Place: , Logan, Arkansas, United States
Age: 54
Birth Year (Estimated): 1903
Residence Place: State Sanatorium, Logan, Arkansas
Spouse's Name: Doris Cline
Spouse's Age: 49
Spouse's Birth Year (Estimated): 1908
Spouse's Residence Place: State Sanatorium, Logan, Arkansas
Marriage License Date: 06 Sep 1957
Page: 612
GS Film number: 2069449
Digital Folder Number: 004331522
Image Number: 00063
"Arkansas, County Marriages, 1837-1957," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NMTN-NBH : accessed 30 Apr 2014), John Rush Johnson and Doris Cline, 07 Sep 1957; citing , Logan, Arkansas, United States; FHL microfilm 2069449.

Name: Don Hooker
Event Type: Marriage
Event Date (Formatted): 10 Dec 1957
Event Place: , Logan, Arkansas, United States
Age: 22
Birth Year (Estimated): 1935
Residence Place: State Sanatorium, Logan, Arkansas
Spouse's Name: Erma Lee Johnson
Spouse's Age: 23
Spouse's Birth Year (Estimated): 1934
Spouse's Residence Place: State Sanatorium, Logan, Arkansas
Marriage License Date: 10 Dec 1957
Page: 628
GS Film number: 2069449
Digital Folder Number: 004331522
Image Number: 00071
"Arkansas, County Marriages, 1837-1957," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NMTN-JQC : accessed 30 Apr 2014), Don Hooker and Erma Lee Johnson, 10 Dec 1957; citing , Logan, Arkansas, United States; FHL microfilm 2069449.
Two things, actually.

Both of these couples' place of residence was the State Sanatorium in Logan County.

So I know something more about them.

They were Caucasian.

The State tuberculosis sanatorium for white people was at Booneville, in Logan County.

It was later converted into a warehouse for people with disabilities that Arkansas now very disingenuously calls a Human Development Center.
dee_burris: (Default)
Monday, May 23rd, 2011 05:09 pm
This is one of the churches and cemeteries my cousin and I visited on one of the hottest days last summer in Logan County, AR.

Her dad's family settled there in Logan County the last quarter of the 19th century.

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To see other photos of that trip, click here to see Subiaco Abbey.
dee_burris: (Default)
Tuesday, January 18th, 2011 06:50 pm
Because I am not sure if I will renew them, I've been giving my subscriptions to Footnote and Genealogy Bank a workout lately.

They are good resources for finding some of that historic information that helps to add that "third dimension" to my relatives that I discussed here - particularly old newspaper articles.


I found an article from a Dallas newspaper that discussed the uncle of some of my cousins, so I emailed it to them. When one of them replied to thank me, I asked him if he was also interested in seeing news articles about the fire that gutted Subiaco Abbey in 1927.

He said he was. Then he added a very interesting thing...

I remember old stories of the KKK going after Subiaco and the Catholics who moved in that area. I wonder if the fire was an accident or not?!?!? B can tell you a story of our grandmother's house getting shot at in the middle of the night by the Klan. A bullet was lodged in her headboard...while she was sleeping.

I had already wondered if the German Catholic families who settled Logan County in the 1880s had experienced any hostility from their neighbors during World War II, when anti-German sentiment was high.

But I hadn't considered the Klan.

Until now.

I sent my cousin the articles and started my research.

Photobucket
St Albans Daily Messenger, 21 Dec 1927

PhotobucketDallas Morning News, 22 Dec 1927



The Ku Klux Klan had an extensive and high profile history in Arkansas. Still does, to this day.

That's why I was astounded as I was Googling and searching databases for reports of Klan hostilities in Logan County to run across this:

Another faction of the disorder arose in the secret sinister organization known as the Ku Klux Klan. The group was originally organized in Tennessee by a group of Confederate veterans and later spread to other states, including Arkansas, operating as a terrorist organization. Masked, robed, and armed, its members sought to kill or frighten into silence black leaders and their white Unionist allies. The Klan's life was short-lived because law-abiding southern whites turned their backs on the organization that dealt in murder, an action that many of the Klan's early leaders denounced. The Klan's presence had virtually disappeared from Arkansas by the early 1870s. (emphasis added.)
Excerpted from "Powell Clayton and Reconstruction," by Jeannie Whayne, as published in the Fort Smith Historical Society Inc. Journal, Vol. 33, No. 2, September 2009, at page 16. See full issue, here.

With all due respect to Ms. Whayne, I vehemently disagree that the Klan has "virtually disappeared" from Arkansas.

I suspect the writer of this 25 Apr 2009 article in Newsweek would, too.


I knew there had been a fire at Subiaco, but I didn't realize there had been two.

The first was in 1901 in the wooden monastery, which burned to the ground. Construction had already started in 1898 on the current Abbey, which is made of "Subiaco" sandstone, and was thought to be safer from fire.

As seen in the news articles, the fire was believed to have started in the basement. The Abbey's website does not mention a cause of the fire, nor does its blog, although the blog post explains that due to the fire, which completely destroyed the north wing of the Abbey (and two thirds of the monastery), St Benedict had to be repositioned to face south.

Nor does the "official" Encyclopedia of Arkansas article give a cause for the fire.

That's a real puzzle to me. Damage estimates placed monetary loss at the Abbey at $1 million.

That was in 1927.

As of 2009, that loss would be estimated at $12.4 million.

And everyone would want to know exactly what happened.


If my cousin heard talk in days gone by about harassment of the Catholic community in Logan County by the Klan, it's possible others did also.

I can imagine that locals may not have discussed such things with law enforcement, fearing retaliation if they did.

Or that if they did take their concerns to the police, those concerns were swept under the rug.

And I'd sure be interested in hearing about those incidents now...
dee_burris: (Default)
Saturday, December 25th, 2010 03:52 pm
A little late posting this entry, since Saturday is winding down...

The Lensing family was headed by German Catholic immigrants to this country. Their arrival in the 1880s was likely due, at least in part, to a concerted "outreach" effort in 1877 by the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad to recuit families such as theirs to western Arkansas.

I also think - rightly or wrongly - a big part of their reason for coming was what we call the American dream.

Henry (Heinrich) Lensing was born on 12 Feb 1836 in Klaster, Burla, Westfalen, Germany. He came to Arkansas with his first wife, Maria Anna Roessing, who died in 1881 in Logan County. This information fits the responses to the United State census that Henry gave in 1900, when he said the year of his immigration was 1880. Henry and Maria Anna had at least one daughter about whom I have documentation. She was Anna Marie Christina E Lensing, born 2 Feb 1872 in Borken, Prussia. She married Henry Duelmer.

By the time Henry answered the 1900 census enumerator's questions, he had remarried to Christine Duelmer in 1884, and the couple had six children. (I have been able to document eight children total for Henry and Christine - if someone else has more, please let me know.)
Christine Duelmer was born on 20 Jun 1866 in Westphalia, Prussia.

Christine's family had also immigrated from Germany to Logan County. In the 1900 census, Christine Lensing's year of immigration was 1884. She came with her parents, Josef Duelmer and Maria Catherina Belker, on the ship Rhein on 13 Aug 1884. Port of departure was Bremen.

Children of Henry and Christine were:
  • Alois Lensing was born on 9 Oct 1885 in Logan Co., AR. He died on 18 Aug 1969 in Logan Co., AR. He was buried in Saint Scholastica Cemetery, New Blaine, Logan Co., AR.
  • Caspar Lensing was born on 6 Jan 1888 in Logan Co., AR. He died on 8 May 1936 in Logan Co., AR. He was buried in Saint Ignatius Cemetery, Scranton, Logan Co., AR. He married Anna C Heim, daughter of George Michal Heim and Elizabeth L "Lizzie" Raible on 5 Sep 1911 in Logan Co., AR. Anna was born on 4 Apr 1892 in Logan Co., AR. She died on 18 May 1984 in Logan Co., AR. She was buried in Saint Ignatius Cemetery, Scranton, Logan Co., AR.
  • Herman Benedict Lensing was born on 21 Mar 1890 in Logan Co., AR. He died on 4 Nov 1967 in New Blaine, Logan Co., AR. He was buried in Saint Scholastica Cemetery, New Blaine, Logan Co., AR. He married Anna Schulte. Anna was born on 4 Feb 1893. She died on 4 Jul 1959 in Logan Co., AR. She was buried in Saint Scholastica Cemetery, New Blaine, Logan Co., AR.
  • Henry Lensing was born on 30 Sep 1892 in Logan Co., AR. He died on 23 Apr 1973 in Logan Co., AR. He was buried in Saint Scholastica Cemetery, New Blaine, Logan Co., AR. He married Ida Engel on 15 Feb 1916. Ida was born on 11 Nov 1896. She died on 22 Jun 1961 in Logan Co., AR. She was buried in Saint Scholastica Cemetery, New Blaine, Logan Co., AR.
  • Tresia (Thressa) Lensing was born in Feb 1895 in Logan Co., AR.
  • Rosa Lensing was born in Feb 1898 in Logan Co., AR.
  • Joseph Lensing was was born on 10 Oct 1901 in Logan Co., AR. He died on 18 Jul 1977 in Logan Co., AR. He was buried in Saint Peter and Saint Paul Cemetery, Morrison Bluff, Logan Co., AR. He married Mary N Anhalt. Mary was born on 2 Apr 1903. She died on 30 Nov 1977 in Logan Co., AR. She was buried in Saint Peter and Saint Paul Cemetery, Morrison Bluff, Logan Co., AR.
  • Anna Lensing was born on 21 Feb 1905 in Logan Co., AR. She died on 29 Nov 1928 in Logan Co., AR. She was buried in Saint Peter and Saint Paul Cemetery, Morrison Bluff, Logan Co., AR. She married Henry Joseph Wewers, son of John Raesfeld Wewers and Theresa Raible. Henry was born on 21 Mar 1895. He died on 11 Oct 1951 in Logan Co., AR. He was buried in Saint Peter and Saint Paul Cemetery, Morrison Bluff, Logan Co., AR.
I'd be interested in finding out what happened to two of the Lensing sisters, Thressa and Rosa, after about 1920.  If other Lensing or Logan County researchers know, please comment.

ETA on 4 Nov 2013: 
A comment submitted to me via email by Simone Steiner said: As to Henry Lensing you mentioned in your article that he was born in "Klaster, Burla". I assume that this is "Kloster Burlo" (Burlo monastery), which is part of the village of Burlo, which again belongs to the city of Borken. In the past, there was a Gross Burlo (big Burlo) and Klein Burlo (small Burlo).

Some quick search on Google showed that from 1724 the Burlo monastery was the liege of the Lensing farm. Lensing might also be spelled Lensingh or Lensink. To find more information about the family you might also search for "lensing borkenwirthe". Borkenwirthe is the name of the neighborhood.

Also the surname Roessing (Rößing) already existed in Borken in 1498 spelled Rosinck.


Some good information to have...
dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, December 22nd, 2010 06:51 pm
It's a Catholic icon in Arkansas. Established after successful negotiations for the necessary acreage with the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad Company in 1877, Subiaco is a Benedictine monastery in Logan Co., AR within the Roman Catholic Diocese in Little Rock.

It is also near to the heart of one of my aunts and several of my cousins, as the Henry Lensing family were some of the German immigrants to the United States and Logan County whose lives were entwined with the church for many years.

One of my cousins and I visited Subiaco last summer on a blitz to locate gravestones of several of her ancestors on her father's side of the family.

 photo GEDC0138.jpg

 photo gryphon2.jpg

 photo frontofchurch.jpg

 photo GEDC0187.jpg


As we were touring the inside of the church admiring stained glass windows, she whispered for me to come here.

 photo BarbaraHeimfull.jpg

 photo BarbaraHeim.jpg


That window was donated to the church by her father's favorite aunt, for whom my cousin was named.

It was a wonderful discovery during a trip seeking her roots.