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Friday, December 10th, 2010 05:08 pm
Thomas G Hemphill was born in June 1842, the son of Samuel Hemphill and Nancy Callaway. He was single all his life, as far as I can tell.

He enlisted in the Confederate States Army at Little Rock on 15 Jul 1861. He served as a Private in the Clark Co Artillery, Wiggins Battery, 2nd Ark Light Artillery.

A note at this website discusses the history of the battery and states, in part:

For reasons not yet fully researched, the men of the Clark County Artillery appear to have been singled out by the Federal authorities for harsher than normal treatment. They were not included in the general parole of prisoners in April and May of 1865, but were held well into the summer of that year before finally being released.

Thomas' military records seem to bear that out.

According to muster roll records, Thomas was taken prisoner at Shelbyville TN on 27 Jun 1863. Then, he was:
  • Sent to Louisville KY on 15 Jul 1863.
  • Sent to Camp Chase (OH) 20 Jul 1863.
  • Transferred to Camp Douglass (IL) on 24 Aug 1863. (Muster roll record dated Nov/Dec 1864 showed him as a POW, with last pay date of 30 Apr 1863.)
  • Transferred to Point Lookout MD on 14 Mar 1865.
  • Admitted to General Hospital, Howard's Grove, Richmond VA on 22 Mar 1865 (treatment for "scorb," e.g., scurvy).
  • Paroled at Meridian MS on 10 May 1865.
Thomas returned home to Clark County.

In the 1880 census, he was living with his brother John and his family in Clark County.

In 1900 he was listed as a boarder in the home of Alonzo and Martha Obaugh, Caddo Twp, Clark Co., AR. Alonzo was his step-brother, his mother having married Alonzo's father, James H Obaugh, in 1858, after the death of Samuel Hemphill in 1847.

According to the Clark County Historical Association's cemetery book, "Clark County Cemeteries, Vol II," T G Hemphill is buried in an unmarked grave in Rose Hill Cemetery in Arkadelphia. A list of Confederates buried in unmarked graves in Rose Hill was extracted from an article in the Southern Standard dated 1 Jul 1909.

So for now, I have to date Thomas Hemphill's death between 1900 and 1909. If anyone has an exact date of death, I'd love to hear from you.
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Sunday, November 7th, 2010 09:38 am
Generally speaking, we love to love our Callaways.

But some of our male Callaways were a rowdy bunch, particularly in the early days of settling the various territories and towns where they lived.

Especially the line of Callaway men who descended from John S T Callaway. Several of them settled their disputes with their fists, were arrested and found guilty of assault, and then went on to hold elected office (Sheriff) in their towns. Go figure - I guess people felt safe with a man who was good in a fistfight, as long as they weren't on the receiving end.

Jonathan Wilson Callaway was John S T's grandson. His parents were Jonathan Owsley Callaway and Emily Hemphill.

Jonathan first married Harriet Jane Beall, daughter of Asa B and Sarah Ann Beall, on 28 Jan 1858 in Clark Co., AR. She was 16 years old. Harriet died on 23 Apr 1859 in Clark Co. - I suspect in childbirth, but have not be able to prove that.

Then, he married Ann E Vickers, daughter of E R Vickers, in 1867 after the Civil War. They had three daughters, Lizzie Callaway, Mary E Callaway High, and Julia Estelle Callaway.

From Goodspeed's Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Central Arkansas, (publ. 1889) at page 427, the following:

He was appointed first lieutenant in Capt. Flanagin's Company (E), McIntosh's regiment, later being made commissary of subsistence in the regimental brigade and division. He was afterward assigned to duty as assistant to the chief of the bureau of subsistence for the Trans-Mississippi Department, with headquarters at Shreveport, La., and Marshall, Tex. His final surrender was made with the Confederate forces, at Shreveport, at the close of the war, in May, 1865, following which he walked the whole distance back to Arkadelphia.

After the war, Jonathan moved around a lot, always in connection with his business interests. He also had political aspirations, according to Goodspeed's narrative:

In October, 1865, Mr. Callaway embarked in the commission business at Camden, Ark., which he continued until 1872, a part of the time residing at New Orleans in connection with his business interests. In 1874 he was elected clerk of the State senate, and in 1876 received the nomination of the Democratic State Convention for clerk of the chancery court, to which position he was elected. Removing to Little Rock he held the office for five terms, or ten years, then voluntarily retiring, much to the regret of those whose interests he had so well and faithfully served. The year 1867 witnessed his marriage with Miss Annie Vickers, and to their union three children have been born: Lizzie, Mary and Estelle. Mr. Callaway occasionally acts as commissioner or receiver of the Pulaski Chancery Court, and is lending his valuable assistance in populating Arkansas with immigrants and developing the immense resources of the county and State. He enjoys a wide acquaintance and the respect and esteem of a host of friends.

However, apparently not everyone thought so highly of him. An interesting news clipping from the Arkansas Gazette, dated 15 May 1884 about an item in the Arkansas Democrat:
"Mr. Callaway, candidate for chancery clerk, who now has 'nothing to say against the amendment,' once carried a pair of scissors in his pocket about the polls at Little Rock, and, while urging the negroes to vote against the measure, clipped 'for amendment' off the tickets, and palmed those bob-tailed tickets off on voters who could not read. Furthermore, his charges in the matter of the fees of his office are not above the severest criticism. Amendment men, honest Democrats of Sebastian county, what do you think about nominating this man?"

"I denounce the above statement of the Fort Smith Tribune and The Democrat as maliciously false in every item and essential particular and assert the belief that its author, E C Johnson, (as heretofore demonstrated) has not the manliness to submit the question of veracity here raised to any fair and honorable test. J W Callaway, May 15, 1884"


There was a response the next day in the Arkansas Gazette:
J W Callaway, in the Arkansas Democrat yesterday, denies that he 'clipped tickets,' and urged the negroes to vote against the amendment in the election of 1880. This adds to his list of infamies the additional one of a falsifier, as I will prove in due time. I will be in the city until 12 p.m. today (Friday) - longer if necessary. E C Johnson, Little Rock, May 16, 1884.

The "amendment" spoken of in both news items was one authored by William Meade Fishback, who became concerned with the issue of repudiation of Arkansas's debt. He believed that some of the state's debt was created by fraudulent means, and some was the result of Reconstruction. He argued that only "just" debt should be repaid. He introduced what is known as the "Fishback Amendment" to the state constitution, which prohibited the state authorities from paying the Holford bonds (results of Arkansas's prewar credit troubles), railroad aid and levee bonds (both challenged because the funds did not produce measurable results). Though the proposed amendment failed to pass in 1880, it was finally approved by voters in the 1884 general election, and adopted as the first amendment to the constitution in January 1885.

Kinda sounds like E C Johnson was calling Jonathan out to me...I never could find out if they actually dueled.

Jonathan Wilson Callaway died in Pulaski Co., AR in 1894.
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Monday, November 1st, 2010 08:46 pm
Jonathan Owsley Callaway was the son of John S T and Amy (Stamps) Callaway. He was born in 1803 in the portion of the Louisiana Purchase that became Ste Genevieve County, Missouri. His father owned large tracts of land in Ste Genevieve County, but there is evidence that Jonathan's parents began selling off the land sometime around 1820-1821, preparatory to their move south to Clark County, AR.

On 10 Nov 1825, Jonathan married Emily Hemphill, daughter of John and Nancy Lawson Hemphill. Emily was born in Georgia in 1799. At the time of her marriage to Jonathan Callaway, Emily was the widow of Thomas Fish, whom she had married in 1820. Thomas Fish died in 1823.

Now, for the children... )
Jonathan is credited with building the first hotel in Arkadelphia, previously called Blakelytown. The name of the hotel was the Merchants Exchange, built in 1842. Later, it was sold to Solomon Spence, who razed it and built another hotel on the site, which was destroyed in a fire in 1872. (Source: Clark Co Historical Journal (1991) at page 96.)

Clark County records show that at the time of his death, Jonathan O Callaway owned several slaves, which were listed with other "property" of his estate:
Jonathan O Callaway (Calloway) died ca ___Mar 1855 (coffin bought). Admin W H Callaway, followed by Samuel D Callaway, "de bonis non" who resigned 15 July 1861. Heirs: Jonathan W Callaway, Lawson Callaway, Emily Callaway, James Callaway, William H Callaway, Samuel D Callaway, Mary Hardy. Slaves belonging to the estate: Green, a man 29 years old; Harrison, a man 32; John, a man 32; Wesley, a man 25; American, a woman 27; Ardilla, a girl 13; Isham, a boy 15; Perry, a boy 11; Julia Ann, a girl 10; Nepha, a girl 18 (went to Mrs. Hardy).

Mrs. Hardy was Jonathan's daughter, Mary T (Callaway) Hardy Wilson.