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dee_burris: (Default)
Sunday, May 20th, 2012 07:41 am
Geneabloggers who have been blogging for any length of time know this to be true.

If you blog it, they will come.

Cousins you never knew you had will find your blog entries in searches on Google and other search engines.

In the case of several of mine, they will keep coming back.

They cheer me on.

They share photos and other interesting tidbits they discover in their own searches, and keep an eye out for surnames in my tree that aren't even in theirs.

My cup ran over this week.
First was Dixie, a new Balding cousin.

She found my Wedding Wednesday entry on Anson Balding and Ruth Woodrow.

She's a direct descendant. She gave me the names and other data on 5 of the 8 children born to them.

And thoughts about where some of those folks are buried - right here in Little Rock, in two of my favorite cemeteries.
My Callaway cousin, Joe, shared a photo I'd never seen before of Thomas Nathaniel Callaway and Laura Isibelle Holder. (They are his great grandparents.)

Photobucket


Thomas Callaway was the son of Nathaniel C Callaway, whose grave we'd never been able to find until a chance remark made to me at the annual Callaway/Holder family reunion in 2010 made me come home and give Google a real workout.

Joe and I went to Elmwood Cemetery in February last year, and finally placed proper markers on Nathaniel's grave and that of one of his cousins.
And bless her soul...

My Freeman cousin, Jennie, always keeps me in mind in her searches. She and I have deep ancestral roots in Pope Co., AR, and before that, in Tennessee.

My morning email had a note from her wondering if she had located the grave of Anne Parker, wife of William Stout. I had no dates of birth or death for either of them, and did not know where they were buried. Their son, John Wesley Stout, married Martha Jane Ashmore, my first cousin, 3 times removed.

The grave she found at Arkansas Gravestones wasn't the right one, but I did a little searching around and found both William Stout and Anne Parker's graves memorialized in Old Lake Cemetery, just outside Dover.

They were buried on their farm. A memorial plaque for William said he was assassinated at his farm on 4 December 1865.

There were a lot of bushwhackers from both the Union and Confederate sides back then.

So now, I'll wonder...

Did one or more of them surprise 56 year old William Stout as he fed his livestock or mended harness, or any one of many other winter chores?

Or could it have been one of his neighbors? Loyalties were deeply divided in Arkansas about the Civil War...
Keep up with your cousins, folks.
dee_burris: (Default)
Monday, August 8th, 2011 08:39 pm
Apparently my post about what I believe to be the very old Freeman homeplace has caused a bit of a stir with some folks.

One being my cousin-in-law, who is almost sure it isn't, and said as much to the two Freeman descendants who came to look at it up close and in person this past weekend.

He has his reasons - which he and I discussed by phone earlier this evening.

One of them being that it is not a dogtrot house, since they were usually two cabins, each with its own fireplace, with a breezeway in the middle.

And he's right about that - it isn't a dogtrot.

And I didn't say it was.

I said it is a shotgun house which was very popular with poor people, and very easily added on to, as we see in the homestead I *still* believe is the Freeman place.

My reasons are more mundane. There's that matter of the nearby creek, which isn't where it needs to be in the southwest part of Section 11 cousin-in-law says the house is in, but is there in Section 14, where I say it is.

So we'll be looking at some more plat books...
dee_burris: (Default)
Sunday, July 10th, 2011 10:44 am
I got a contact about my post on the very old Freeman place from a descendant of William Aflred Freeman.

She was excited to see the photos, which I invited her to copy for her own use. And she also gave me some more information about Freeman descendants.

Which I have dutifully researched and added to my GEDCOM.

We aren't cousins, but I keep up with the ones who married into my family anyway.

Because you just never can tell when someone might need some information.
I've spent some time this morning working on another family tree I manage for a dear friend.

Right now, I'm messing with Joseph Wesley Roach, born 16 Dec 1884 in Missouri and died 4 Jan 1978 in Randolph Co., AR.

My friend's mother is a Randolph County Roach. I know Joseph Wesley figures into her line of Roaches somehow - there were quite a few who stopped off in Missouri on their way south from Illinois to Randolph County. He named his sons some of the favored male Roach names - Jesse, James, Arthur.

I just can't find his parents.

Yet.
I'd love to be graving.

But it is just too fricking hot.

Every day, I get my Weather Channel text advising of dangerous heat indices. Not that I need the official notice.

We have reached that time in Arkansas summer where you can step outside your front door and feel that the air has mass from the combination of temperature and humidity. The cottage has not received any measurable rainfall since June 28.

I've been looking back at the family photos I have of ancestral homeplaces. Thinking about how it was that they tried to beat the heat of Arkansas summers before the days of air conditioning.

Like the Williams' home in Russellville.

Or the Herrington homeplace in Clark County.

Photobucket

Photobucket


In the two photos above, you can see 1) the shed behind the house, and 2) part of the covered front porch of the house.

The Williams home also had covered porches.

Did they sleep on them in the summertime?

More things that make me say, hmmmm...
dee_burris: (Default)
Sunday, April 3rd, 2011 07:31 pm
Last spring, a little over a year to this day, my dad and I went to take photos of the McCarley family cemetery, long abandoned and quite neglected.

As we emerged four-wheel drive hell, we came across an old abandoned homeplace on our cousin-in-law's land. We didn't stop then, but I have been dying to get photos of it ever since.

My plat book says that William Alfred Freeman got a land patent on that parcel in 1845. The home, which shows signs of two additions, probably will not be standing much longer. If any of the Freeman descendants are interested, below are photos of how it looks now, as well as the little bit of Freeman family history I've been able to piece together.

Because as can be expected, one of the Freemans married into the Burris clan...


Dad and I saw the house from the side on that first trip, and discussed whether it was really a house or an old barn.

You get the front view first.

Photobucket

It's a shotgun house, as was common in the South (best seen from the rear).

Photobucket

However, as Dad pointed out to me, it didn't start that way.

The house had two additions to it over the years, as you can see in the side view here, with different styles of siding on each addition and the original.

Photobucket

As I looked at how small that first section was, I wondered how many people the home had sheltered before they decided to add on.

William Alfred Freeman probably did not live there very long. He got the land patent in 1845, but died by 1847. His widow, Mary Elizabeth Ward lived until 1873.

I found three of their sons in the 1850 census in Conway County (this land was at that time in Griffin Township, Conway County, and did not become Pope County until later).

Those sons were Alfred (born in 1822), Thomas (born in 1825) and Jesse (born in 1831). Alfred was married by the 1850 census, and he and his wife, Kezziah Mariah Bass, had two sons, Richard and James.

Thomas was a newlywed at the 1850 census, having married Lucinda Angeline Burris, daughter of John Burris and Cynthia Ann Ashmore. Jesse was still single.

So it's possible that in 1850, the first section of that house provided a home for as many as eight people. (Side view with sections marked in red below.)

Photobucket


The house stood on rock pilings.

Dad noticed that several of the rocks had been chiseled to make them fit snugly together.

Photobucket

Because of the shape of this one, we wondered if it had been flipped over at the entrance to make a step more stable.

Photobucket

Even if they hauled the rocks from the creekbed nearby, it's still about a quarter of a mile away.

And then, they chiseled them by hand.


I don't know who lived in the house when the Freemans left it, or if anyone did.

But it's a little bit of history in the woods of Pope County, and I wanted to be able to remember it, even after it is gone.
dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, January 19th, 2011 02:15 pm
Mt Vernon School was in Pope Co., AR.

The text accompanying the photograph starts with identifications in the back row of the photo.


PhotobucketAt left is the teacher, Floy Beason. Others include: Front, from left - Arkie Burris, Ethel Wright, Gertha Wright, Alvis Coffman, Winford Coffman, Manuel Freeman, Melissa Coffman, Eula Wright and William J Coffman; second row - Edna Burris, Etta Coffman, Victoria Coffman, Nona Wright, Myrta Wright, and Laura Huffman; front - Hester Jobe, Iva Freeman, Minnie Coffman, Mabell Coffman, and Laura Coffman; bottom - Burris boy, Neadan Burris, Edgar Wright, Bill Jobe, Mike Jobe, Marvin Coffman, Fred Burris and Paul Burris. (Photo courtesy of Gertha Melton.)

From the surnames listed, it looks like this was a very small school and very much a "neighborhood" school.
dee_burris: (Default)
Thursday, December 9th, 2010 05:54 pm
From the Russellville [AR] Courier Democrat, 3 Nov 1898:

Since our last reports, County Clerk Mourning has issed marriage license to the following persons: J M Epps to Miss Lula Epps; W R Freeman to Miss Rena Dunlay; Everett McGorven to Miss Ora Butler.