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dee_burris: (Default)
Monday, December 10th, 2012 08:15 pm
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My newly found, who-knows-how-many-times-removed Chapin cousin is hunting for information about her great great grandfather.

She has quite a bit of information already. She wants to find his grave, which she suspects is unmarked. She recently has been to Evergreen Cemetery twice on that quest.

And she shared a photo.

Photobucket
Lucius Milo Chapin and wife, Viola M Bayle


Information about interments at Evergreen Cemetery in Union City, Erie Co., PA show the graves of Lucius, Viola and Paul (one of their sons) in Section 6, Lot 53. A caretaker told my cousin that the graves are in Lot 38 instead.

I hope she finds markers buried in sod.

I wonder if Lucius would have a Union Army marker. If he doesn't have one, she can get one from the VA for him.

For free.
According to existing documents, Lucius Milo Chapin enlisted at Venango Township, Erie County, PA on 21 Aug 1861 as a Private in Company K of the 83rd Pennsylvania Volunteers.

He was wounded at the second Battle of Bull Run on 30 Aug 1862, and discharged 28 Jan 1863, for wounds received.

His thumb and forefinger were shot off in the battle. Look at the photo above.

According to my cousin, when Lucius posed for photos afterward, he kept something in his left hand to hide the amputations.

And it must have been incredibly hard for him to return to farming afterward.

He applied for a Civil War pension as an invalid on 27 Oct 1863.

I hope he got it.
Lucius married Viola Bayle on 1 Oct 1866. She was the daughter of Samuel K and Theresa L Bayle.

They had five children. The 1870 census in Erie Co., PA shows their first child, a 3 year-old son named Otis.

And that's the last time I saw Otis in the census. The 1900 census says Viola was the mother of 5 children, 4 of whom were living at the time of the census.

I can't find a record of little Otis in cemetery records on Find a Grave for Erie County.

Other children born to Lucius and Viola were Adda, Nora, Paul and Samuel.

Lucius Milo Chapin died on 13 Jun 1928.
And eureka!

As I have been typing this post, my cousin has filled me in on more of the descendants down to her.

We are 10th cousins.
dee_burris: (Default)
Thursday, June 14th, 2012 06:26 pm
Another cousin found me.

She's my fourth cousin, twice removed.

Like all of us, she has a big honking brick wall in her family tree. The surname is Baird.

And I'm trying to get her to do a guest post...
dee_burris: (Default)
Sunday, May 20th, 2012 07:41 am
Geneabloggers who have been blogging for any length of time know this to be true.

If you blog it, they will come.

Cousins you never knew you had will find your blog entries in searches on Google and other search engines.

In the case of several of mine, they will keep coming back.

They cheer me on.

They share photos and other interesting tidbits they discover in their own searches, and keep an eye out for surnames in my tree that aren't even in theirs.

My cup ran over this week.
First was Dixie, a new Balding cousin.

She found my Wedding Wednesday entry on Anson Balding and Ruth Woodrow.

She's a direct descendant. She gave me the names and other data on 5 of the 8 children born to them.

And thoughts about where some of those folks are buried - right here in Little Rock, in two of my favorite cemeteries.
My Callaway cousin, Joe, shared a photo I'd never seen before of Thomas Nathaniel Callaway and Laura Isibelle Holder. (They are his great grandparents.)

Photobucket


Thomas Callaway was the son of Nathaniel C Callaway, whose grave we'd never been able to find until a chance remark made to me at the annual Callaway/Holder family reunion in 2010 made me come home and give Google a real workout.

Joe and I went to Elmwood Cemetery in February last year, and finally placed proper markers on Nathaniel's grave and that of one of his cousins.
And bless her soul...

My Freeman cousin, Jennie, always keeps me in mind in her searches. She and I have deep ancestral roots in Pope Co., AR, and before that, in Tennessee.

My morning email had a note from her wondering if she had located the grave of Anne Parker, wife of William Stout. I had no dates of birth or death for either of them, and did not know where they were buried. Their son, John Wesley Stout, married Martha Jane Ashmore, my first cousin, 3 times removed.

The grave she found at Arkansas Gravestones wasn't the right one, but I did a little searching around and found both William Stout and Anne Parker's graves memorialized in Old Lake Cemetery, just outside Dover.

They were buried on their farm. A memorial plaque for William said he was assassinated at his farm on 4 December 1865.

There were a lot of bushwhackers from both the Union and Confederate sides back then.

So now, I'll wonder...

Did one or more of them surprise 56 year old William Stout as he fed his livestock or mended harness, or any one of many other winter chores?

Or could it have been one of his neighbors? Loyalties were deeply divided in Arkansas about the Civil War...
Keep up with your cousins, folks.
dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, January 18th, 2012 05:52 pm
You know how every once in a while you get a contact from someone researching the same surname you are, and they ask a question about one of the collateral relatives in your direct line?

And maybe you do or don't know, but you strike up a little correspondence about it, and before you know it, you've taken off on looking at the brothers and sisters of your however-many-greats ancestor, and making all sorts of new discoveries...

I love it when that happens, and will do a surname post about my Duncans from Chatham Co., NC in the near future.

Yes, I have the genealogy equivalent of ADD...
dee_burris: (Default)
Friday, October 28th, 2011 07:34 am
To Pope County to meet my newly found second cousin and tromp through a cemetery with him.

It's a crisp fall day, we had rain yesterday, and there is a mist shrouding the ground.

And...I was contacted by another new cousin this week.

This journey is good.
dee_burris: (Default)
Sunday, October 16th, 2011 04:58 pm
A probable Meek cousin, from some of my entries at Find a Grave...

A for real second cousin of the Burris kind, whom I'll get to meet in person on October 28, when we rendezvous at a gas station at the Atkins exit of Interstate 40, on our way to St. Joe Cemetery...

And bless his soul...a cousin several times removed, who found my online tree and is now catching up on the 140 year old Burris secret after emailing me to ask if I knew who his grandfather's father was...His grandfather was James L Hill.
If you've been putting your family history out on the internet and are wondering if it's worth all the time and effort you've put into it...

Let me assure you, it is.
dee_burris: (Default)
Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011 06:28 pm
Before I started this blog, I had a pretty steady stream of email contacts from both my activities on Find a Grave and my online family tree.

I'd get one or two email contacts a week, asking for more information or clarification, or search tips on brick walls. That's in addition to the handful of people with whom I have regular, ongoing email correspondence - usually collaborative research. A far-flung Bowden cousin is steadily sending me information about burial locations for just about all the Bowdens he has in his family tree. We share some, but not all of those.

Since starting this blog on Halloween last year, I get twice as many weekly contacts as I did before. They mention they found my blog in the email. Some of them post comments on relevant entries, but not all.

This week - starting on Sunday - all the contacts have been about collateral relatives, and the people they married. I've learned some really neat details about the people who are the subjects of a search.

So this week, I am hunting death dates and interment information for some people I didn't even realize existed prior to the contact.

For me, these contacts are so illustrative of the ties shared by so many people. Like ripples across a pond, we exist on a web - some of us directly connected, others not.

This week's email exchanges with some very delightful and passionate people makes me realize (once again) that even if I haven't yet fleshed all my collateral lines, or don't know who great grand-aunt Susan married, they are still connected to me.

It's just a different perspective.