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dee_burris: (Default)
Friday, October 28th, 2011 07:34 am
To Pope County to meet my newly found second cousin and tromp through a cemetery with him.

It's a crisp fall day, we had rain yesterday, and there is a mist shrouding the ground.

And...I was contacted by another new cousin this week.

This journey is good.
dee_burris: (Default)
Saturday, October 22nd, 2011 10:05 am
With a couple of exceptions, I haven't been able to bury myself in the family history this week.

I did receive a couple of email contacts though. From a man who seems very insistent that I have incorrectly identified the wife of one of my Conners.

He left two post-its a couple of minutes apart on Margaret E Blann's individual record, saying she was not a Blann, but a Hays instead.

The problem with that is that her FAG memorial says her stone is inscribed, Daughter of J and L Blann, wife of J A Conner. (J A Conner is James Alfred Conner, my second great-grand uncle.) I've replied to him with that information. I can't change the gravestone inscription, and since it was "carved in stone" at the time of her death, I tend to place more credibility on Blann as her maiden surname than his cryptic post-it, which offers no sources at all.

I know he's been in FAG, because he also told me - in a separate email - I had misspelled the name of the cemetery, and referred me to two FAG memorials in that cemetery as proof of the correct way to spell the name of the cemetery.

They are my memorials, and the name of the cemetery is misspelled in FAG. I can't change that, either.
Maybe it's just a difference in style of approach.

When I find something online that looks like the same person in my tree, but different information, I poke around for hours trying to see how the other person might have arrived at the conclusions s/he reached before I make contact.

And in my email, I cite the sources I used to draw my own conclusions.

I just figure that's the best way for either of us to make the changes we can...
dee_burris: (Default)
Sunday, October 16th, 2011 04:58 pm
A probable Meek cousin, from some of my entries at Find a Grave...

A for real second cousin of the Burris kind, whom I'll get to meet in person on October 28, when we rendezvous at a gas station at the Atkins exit of Interstate 40, on our way to St. Joe Cemetery...

And bless his soul...a cousin several times removed, who found my online tree and is now catching up on the 140 year old Burris secret after emailing me to ask if I knew who his grandfather's father was...His grandfather was James L Hill.
If you've been putting your family history out on the internet and are wondering if it's worth all the time and effort you've put into it...

Let me assure you, it is.
dee_burris: (Default)
Thursday, September 22nd, 2011 04:28 pm
All kinds of wonderful posts out there this week - some of them will make you say awww... and at least one may make you say ewww...
Susan at Nolichucky Roots, shared a two-parter written by a researcher of a surname they have in common. The story of James W McAdams, one of Susan's reverse orphan kinfolk is told here and here.

Mel Wolfgang has a wonderful post about family history researchers as storytellers in And Still I Write on his blog, Mnemosyne's Magic Mirror.

When the young 'uns roll their eyes about the dotty genealogist in the family, just have them read Laura's post, Why Old People Should Do Genealogy.

Greta made it through the clean-up of the flood in her basement that resulted from a rainstorm and put things in wonderful perspective in her entry, A Proper Place for Sentiment. Would that I have that kind of grace under pressure...

Okay, not really knowing what to expect, I cruised on over to a Thriller Thursday post at Debbie's blog, Mascot Manor Genealogy, and read about the Naked Turkeys that spelled the demise of her great-grandfather's turkey farm.

Looking for another source of online newspaper archives? Who knew Wikipedia had a list? I didn't until I read this entry at Tangled Trees...

Borrowing a phrase my from son, who isn't into genealogy at all...I say, other bloggers rock.
dee_burris: (Default)
Wednesday, September 14th, 2011 12:01 pm
The 99+ Genealogy Things Meme

This meme was started by Becky over at Kinnexions back in 2009, and is making the rounds again.

The challenge is to write about 99 things that you have done, want to do, or will never do in your lifetime...with a genealogy flair.

Here's the key:

Things you have already done or found: bold face type
Things you would like to do or find: italicize (color optional)
Things you haven’t done or found and don’t care to: plain type

Here's my list:

1. Belong to a genealogical society.
2. Researched records onsite at a court house.
3. Transcribed records.
4. Uploaded tombstone pictures to Find-A-Grave.
5. Documented ancestors for four generations (self, parents, grandparents, great-grandparents).
6. Joined Facebook.

7. Helped to clean up a run-down cemetery.
8. Joined the Genea-Bloggers Group on Facebook.
9. Attended a genealogy conference.
10. Lectured at a genealogy conference.
11. Spoke on a genealogy topic at a local genealogy society.
12. Been the editor of a genealogy society newsletter.
13. Contributed to a genealogy society publication.
14. Served on the board or as an officer of a genealogy society.
15. Got lost on the way to a cemetery.
16. Talked to dead ancestors. Mine give me plenty of feedback.
17. Researched outside the state in which I live.
18. Knocked on the door of an ancestral home and visited with the current occupants.
19. Cold called a distant relative.
20. Posted messages on a surname message board.
21. Uploaded a gedcom file to the internet.
22. Googled my name.
23. Performed a random act of genealogical kindness.
24. Researched a non-related family, just for the fun of it.

25. Have been paid to do genealogical research.
26. Earn a living (majority of income) from genealogical research. Would LOVE to be able to do this.
27. Wrote a letter (or email) to a previously unknown relative.
28. Contributed to one of the genealogy carnivals.
29. Responded to messages on a message board or forum.
30. Was injured while on a genealogy excursion.
31. Participated in a genealogy meme.

32. Created family history gift items (calendars, cookbooks, etc.).
33. Performed a record lookup for someone else.
34. Went on a genealogy seminar cruise.
35. Am convinced that a relative must have arrived here from outer space, or was hatched.
36. Found a disturbing family secret.
37. Told others about a disturbing family secret.
38. Combined genealogy with crafts (family picture quilt, scrapbooking, writing historic fiction).
39. Think genealogy is a passion not a hobby.

40. Assisted finding next of kin for a deceased person.
41. Taught someone else how to find their roots.
42. Lost valuable genealogy data due to a computer crash or hard drive failure.
43. Been overwhelmed by available genealogy technology.
44. Know a cousin of the 4th degree or higher.
45. Disproved a family myth through research.
46. Got a family member to let you copy photos.
47. Used a digital camera to “copy” photos or records.
48. Translated a record from a foreign language. I use Google Translate for this.
49. Found an immigrant ancestor’s passenger arrival record.
50. Looked at census records on microfilm, not on the computer.
51. Used microfiche.

52. Visited the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.
53. Visited more than one LDS Family History Center.
54. Visited a church or place of worship of one of your ancestors.
55. Taught a class in genealogy.
56. Traced ancestors back to the 18th Century.
57. Traced ancestors back to the 17th Century.

58. Traced ancestors back to the 16th Century.
59. Can name all of your great-great-grandparents.
60. Found an ancestor’s Social Security application.
61. Know how to determine a soundex code without the help of a computer.
62. Used Steve Morse’s One-Step searches.
63. Own a copy of Dressed for the Photographer, by Joan Severa.
64. Helped someone find an ancestor using records you had never used for your own research.
65. Visited the main National Archives building in Washington, DC.
66. Visited the Library of Congress.

67. Have an ancestor who came over on the the Ark and the Dove in 1633/1634.
68. Have an ancestor who fought in the Civil War.
69. Taken a photograph of an ancestor’s tombstone.

70. Became a member of the Association of Graveyard Rabbits.
71. Can read a church record in Latin.
72. Have an ancestor who changed their name.
73. Joined a Rootsweb mailing list.
74. Created a family website.
75. Have more than one "genealogy" blog - after a fashion...I think my cemetery blog probably counts.
76. Was overwhelmed by the amount of family information received from someone.
77. Have broken through at least one brick wall.

78. Visited the DAR Library in Washington D.C.
79. Borrowed a microfilm from the Family History Library through a local Family History Center.
80. Have done indexing for Family Search Indexing or another genealogy project.
81. Visited the Butler Center for Arkansas Studies in Little Rock.
82. Had an amazing serendipitous find of the "Psychic Roots" variety. See #16 above.
83. Have an ancestor who was a Patriot in the American Revolutionary War.

84. Have an ancestor who was a Loyalist in the American Revolutionary War.
85. Have both Patriot & Loyalist ancestors.
86. Have used Border Crossing records to locate an ancestor.
87. Use maps in my genealogy research.

88. Have a convict ancestor who was transported from the UK.
89. Found a secret family amongst the male ancestors.
90. Found a cousin in Australia (or other foreign country).
91. Consistently cite my sources.
92. Visited a foreign country (i.e. one I don't live in) in search of ancestors.
93. Can locate any document in my research files within a few minutes.

94. Have an ancestor who was married four times (or more).
95. Made a rubbing of an ancestors gravestone.
96. Organized a family reunion.
97. Published a family history book.
98. Learned of the death of a fairly close relative through research.
99. Have done the genealogy happy dance.
100. Messed up one genealogy document doing the genealogy happy dance about finding another.
101. Offended a family member with my research.
102. Reunited someone with precious family photos or artifacts.


Just a tad less than 63% - wonder if I can pull of some of the ones on my wish list in the next year?
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dee_burris: (Default)
Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011 02:52 pm
Tracking the ancestors of some of the family in-laws...

Have just discovered, unbeknownst to him, that my brother-in-law named his blue and gold macaw after his 5th great-grandfather...

Not just a whole lot of Ichabods running around these days...
dee_burris: (Default)
Tuesday, June 28th, 2011 01:59 pm
So...I've been thinking while I've been on vacation.

Who's going to carry it on when I get to the end of this journey? (For those who may wonder, I think the journey continues, just on a different plane, in a different form.)

Who's going to manage the family tree? Who's going to continue to add the information that comes to light after several more generations?

Who's going to add the dates of death for those of us who are living now?

My son would be the most likely candidate...he's 28.

And is raising my (almost) 4 year old granddaughter, doesn't give a flip about computers, expresses the proper amount of interest in our family history, as long as I keep it brief...

I have a cousin who is keenly interested in the genealogy, but she's in my generation, has no children of her own, and it seems kind of unfair to dump on her, and then have her have to ask herself...

Who's next?
dee_burris: (Default)
Tuesday, June 28th, 2011 11:37 am
Spent some time this morning on email and phone with another Burris researcher, one who manages the Burris DNA project.

We are both stuck in the same generation, and know because of the DNA results that we are related - but through whom?

Most likely the parents of men who were born in the last quarter of the 1700s...men who left their birthplace and wound up the extreme western counties of Tennessee before moving on to Missouri and Arkansas.

I'm confident there will be a break. DNA testing for genealogy purposes is gaining widespread acceptance.

Now, I just have to get my son ready (and willing) to carry the torch in case the break comes after I'm gone...
dee_burris: (Default)
Saturday, May 21st, 2011 09:37 am
I love this photo.

It's my dad with his grand Uncle Jeff and grand Aunt Margaret.



Photobucket
William Jefferson "Jeff" Burris, my dad, Margaret Jane Burris Moore



I figure that photo was taken when Dad was about 4, so it was probably very shortly before Uncle Jeff died in January 1941.

Margaret lived until 1944.

George and Louise Burris must have made a trip from Arkadelphia back to Russellville with my aunts and my dad.

Like my grandparents, we had generational Burris photos in our scrapbooks for many years, too. Photos of me and my sisters at our grand Aunt Emma's house when our family camped not far from the original James Littleton and Adeline Burris homestead in Pope County.

A lot of those photos were lost in a 100 year flood in December 1982, when a freak tornado ripped through Arkansas and dumped a deluge of water across my ancestral homeplace.


We camped on the homestead over 100 years after James and Adeline must have camped on the homestead while they were building their home.

As a kid, I couldn't appreciate that full circle of family history. I enjoyed fishing off the spillway for perch that Dad used to bait his yo-yos and trotlines, and I loved digging for worms beside Aunt Emma's chicken coop. Dad took me through fields that our ancestors had cleared long ago for planting and I was enthralled by the low stacked stone walls they built as they removed the rocks and loosened the soil for planting.


A new cousin found me this week. We aren't sure yet exactly how close our kinship is, but as we compare notes and sources from our family trees, she is prompting memories.

Thank you, Shirley. I need to remember, and pass it on.


The journey is good.

This is a Sepia Saturday post.
dee_burris: (Default)
Sunday, May 15th, 2011 08:41 pm
The Callaway-Holder annual reunion is next month.

A couple of months ago I sent an email to the reunion organizer, proposing that I bring my electronics and a bunch of blank CDs to make sharing information easier.

At the time, I got a rather cool response.

Apparently, someone's warming to the idea.

I got a recent email asking if I was still willing to do that.

Of course I am.

I like sharing.
dee_burris: (Default)
Tuesday, May 10th, 2011 07:34 pm
Just got this notice in my email.

I've done a fair amount of business with Mountain Press, and have always been quite satisfied.

Here's their May Sale notice.
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dee_burris: (Default)
Sunday, May 1st, 2011 08:15 pm
The last couple of weeks have been trying.

At work I am working on a very sad case involving abuse and neglect of children with developmental disabilities in a psychiatric hospital.

And then coming home to consecutive nights of sitting in the cottage, listening to the wail of tornado sirens, one of which is only several hundred yards from my front door.

Morning drives the horror home.

Such devastation. You simply cannot appreciate the totality of the devastation from the media photographs.

In order to fully grasp it, you have to stop the car. Get out, and smell the pungent pine scent combined with gasoline fumes coming from the chain saws that assails you as you pick your way around toppled trees so huge that you and your best friend couldn't wrap your arms around no matter how hard you tried.

You have to stand at the bottom of the ladder and hand one tarp after another up so the next door neighbor can help nail them down over the gaping holes in the roof.

The ones with a roof - even part of one - are the lucky ones.

You have to rock silently as a young woman you just met at Backyard Burger sobs on your shoulder because she doesn't know how long it will be before she can get back to see what's left of her home. If there's anything left at all.

Some of them want to talk. Some of them can't yet.

You need to put some money in the jar at the corner store to help pay for the baby's funeral.


So I've been preoccupied and not paying attention to the ancestors lately.

And they are letting me know they want some attention.

I haven't seen anyone else blog about that. Maybe you have, and I just haven't read *that* entry.

Don't panic. I only see dead people in my dreams.

But there are things that happen here at the cottage that I have come to accept as normal, and they always have to do with researching my ancestral lines and finding answers.

I have a haunted computer printer, coffee maker and bathroom light switch. All three operate independently of me.

Not all the time. Only when I have been working very hard on an ancestral line, or need to.

I'm a very linear thinker, so when these things started happening, I naturally looked for rational answers.

I taped the bathroom light switch in the off position. I'm on the third coffee maker, plugged into a different outlet.

My cousin heard the printer start working all by itself when she was visiting, and left shortly afterward. (I had told her about it, and although she was very polite when I did, I knew she was skeptical. But seeing and hearing is believing.)

And today, all three of them did their stuff.

So I guess I should get back to work, huh?

Wonder who I'll see in a dream tonight...

The journey is good.
dee_burris: (Default)
Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011 06:28 pm
Before I started this blog, I had a pretty steady stream of email contacts from both my activities on Find a Grave and my online family tree.

I'd get one or two email contacts a week, asking for more information or clarification, or search tips on brick walls. That's in addition to the handful of people with whom I have regular, ongoing email correspondence - usually collaborative research. A far-flung Bowden cousin is steadily sending me information about burial locations for just about all the Bowdens he has in his family tree. We share some, but not all of those.

Since starting this blog on Halloween last year, I get twice as many weekly contacts as I did before. They mention they found my blog in the email. Some of them post comments on relevant entries, but not all.

This week - starting on Sunday - all the contacts have been about collateral relatives, and the people they married. I've learned some really neat details about the people who are the subjects of a search.

So this week, I am hunting death dates and interment information for some people I didn't even realize existed prior to the contact.

For me, these contacts are so illustrative of the ties shared by so many people. Like ripples across a pond, we exist on a web - some of us directly connected, others not.

This week's email exchanges with some very delightful and passionate people makes me realize (once again) that even if I haven't yet fleshed all my collateral lines, or don't know who great grand-aunt Susan married, they are still connected to me.

It's just a different perspective.
dee_burris: (Default)
Saturday, March 5th, 2011 03:15 pm
It started off in spectacular fashion about 3 a.m.

Complete with lightning and thunder, and the tell-tale clacking noise of the tops of very tall pine trees crashing together in the wind. Think mega-supersized bamboo wind chimes.

I got up, looked out at the storm, filled cats' food bowl, and went back to bed. I noticed as I walked down the hall that my next door neighbor was up, with several lights on. She gets nervous when it storms.

If it's my time, then it will be my time whether I am conscious or not.

But I did have on decent underwear.


Got up again about 6:30 a.m. I was meeting my cousin at the Arkansas History Commission to look for obituaries for several of her family members on her dad's side.

I always do a little research before those trips in their online catalog. I hate wasting time trying to figure out which reels of microfilm I need while I am there.

And I hate wanting "this" newspaper for "that" time period and finding out that those are the issues that were missing when the newspaper was filmed decades ago.

I *really* wish Arkansas would come into the digital historic document preservation age.


The Arkansas History Commission has scads of microfilm. And back-up copies. On more microfilm, of course.

Some of it is really, really bad. I told one of the staff that as I returned four reels of completely unreadable film.

Yes... he sighed. I know.

Not only do we not digitize our own shit our own selves, we don't want anyone else doing it either.

There are explanations at just about every historic newspaper website, including the subscription and free ones, about why selected states have so few newspapers online.

The states won't grant access to the folks making the digital copies.

So far, it looks to me like Arkansas will grant limited access to its newspapers, if the newspaper was a flash-in-the-pan, and just a few issues were published.

Or if it stopped publishing a century ago.


So I do what I can to help out.

As I do find old newspaper articles about my family history, I also copy interesting stuff from the same issue.

And little by little, I am digitizing all that stuff in this blog in entries I call bits and pieces.

I know - it's a mere pittance.

But more than we had before.


The journey is good.

Namaste.
dee_burris: (Default)
Saturday, March 5th, 2011 07:03 am
To look for old newspaper obits, and see if the book on Arkansas moonshiners that came up in my Burris surname search has any interesting tidbits...

After all, I need to stay current on my microfilm scrolling skills...
dee_burris: (Default)
Monday, February 28th, 2011 07:28 pm
I have images of the divine feminine scattered all around my home.

This one is my favorite. For me, she is Every Woman.




March is Women's History Month. I'll be in my element.

Many historians now acknowledge that the role women played in history has been largely unsung for far too many years.

In March, my blog will be top heavy with information about the women in my family tree, as well as some of those from the other trees I manage.

I'm also going to spend some time "graduating" some of my MNUs to women with complete identities - after all, her history didn't start with her marriage.

And I'm going to try and stop acting surprised when I find women who didn't marry at all - I usually run back over my source information to make sure I didn't miss the husband.

Or the kids. A few of the women in my tree married, but did not have children. I expect some of those chose not to.


The theme for the 2011 Women's History Month from The Women's National History Project is Our History is Our Strength.

Now, how cool is that?
dee_burris: (Default)
Monday, February 28th, 2011 06:24 pm
The annual Callaway/Holder (or Holder/Callaway, depending on who your granddaddy was) reunion will be in late June again this year.

Like every year, so I hear. Last year was my first.

I bet I get pegged as an upstart.

'Cause I just sent an email to the reunion organizer - a many times removed cousin - suggesting that anyone who wanted to could swap digitized family information this year.

I'll bring the laptop, portable Flip-pal scanner and digital cameras, and a stack of blank CDs...

I'm curious as to how she will respond.
dee_burris: (Default)
Saturday, February 26th, 2011 05:26 pm
You never know until you ask...

I was informed that Essie Chapin and Elbert Carr married in Umatilla Co., OR on 13 May 1893.

So one day I called the Umatilla County Clerk to see if there was a copy of the marriage license.

She said yes, but they weren't married on 13 May, it was 1 May instead. She also said if I'd give her my address, she would mail the license and affidavit.

So I did.

Photobucket

Photobucket


The ceremony was performed at the cleryman's home, and it looks as if two of his relatives were the witnesses.

The affidavit says Essie was a resident of Umatilla Co., OR, and Elbert W Carr was a resident of Whitman County, WA.

So now I have another area of the country to search to find out more about Elbert W Carr.


One of the keepers of the (Essie Chapin) family Bible has been active with comments today. She is quite pissed that I use ~ gasp ~ historic records in my searches of the family history.

You know - stuff like census records, marriage, birth and death records, military records, obituaries, gravestone information, etc.

Apparently this stuff is not agreeing with her family Bible - and let me add, her oral family history as well - according to her most recent comment, which I deleted.

Her Bible and oral history gave forth the date of the marriage above as 13 May 1893. So this entry will probably make her blow a gasket.

I am getting very weary of someone who won't put up, and can't seem to shut up.

She needs her own blog.
dee_burris: (Default)
Monday, February 21st, 2011 08:16 pm
I've met a lot of family historians, genealogists and gravers* who grumble about large cemeteries.

You know the big honking ones with paved streets and street signs - the kind you *need* a map to get around in.

If it has more than 20,000 burials, then I call it a large cemetery.

Some of them say they find the big ones, especially the corporate big ones, cold, impersonal and dismissive.

I think those are probably really the (very small) minority of the tens of thousands of cemeteries all over this country where people are dying to help you (pun intended.)

And every once in a while, you run across a stellar operation.

I think that should be acknowledged.

*graver. Noun. A person who photographs funerary art for the sheer joy of it and is catapulted into a state of bliss when the stones are damp with a recent light rain.


Dear Board of Trustees and Staff of Elmwood...

I’ve been to Elmwood twice in the past six months. Before then, I am ashamed to say, I didn’t even know it existed.

I am a “graver.” I have loved and photographed funerary art for many years. So Elmwood should have been on my radar for that reason alone. It is a stunning presentation of funerary art that has evolved over decades, and is immaculately maintained.

I found Elmwood because I was searching for my g-g-g grandfather’s date and location of death, and his place of burial. It took me two years of looking off and on until I finally mis-spelled his surname badly enough for a Google search engine to give me some valid results.

Nathaniel C Callaway (1819-1862) went off to fight in the CSA on 6 Mar 1862. He enlisted in his home town of Arkadelphia, in Clark County, AR. His youngest child had just celebrated his fourth birthday. Nathaniel and his wife, Julia Ann, had just buried their second child nine months earlier.

And he just never came back.

None of the descendants at the annual family reunion knew when or where he died or was buried. No one’s parents knew what happened to him.

And I finally found him at Elmwood. Not only that, but one of his cousins. They were buried in the section called Confederate Soldiers Rest.

So I rounded up a Callaway cousin and we came to see.

We discovered that Nathaniel C and Levi A Callaway’s graves were not formally marked, but had the numbered concrete markers installed on all the Confederate graves in 1886. So we ordered their military markers from the VA.

And waited.

From the very beginning, our experience with Elmwood has been marvelous. We have now been to Elmwood twice, and enjoyed the hospitality and professionalism of your staff – from the front office all the way to the cemetery superintendent, Todd Fox. In addition, I’ve had perhaps a half dozen telephone conversations and email exchanges with your staff that expedited setting up a date to watch Mr. Fox install gravestones on our Callaway ancestors’ graves.

Nearly a century and a half after they died, we now have photos of their properly marked graves, in the shade of wondrous southern magnolias. I am grateful that our Callaway men who died so far from home have such a lovely resting place. Almost next to each other.

Please share this letter and my thanks and appreciation with everyone who works so hard to make Elmwood the fine cemetery it is.

Sincerely



Sent it by email this afternoon and the hard copy will go out in the snail mail tomorrow.
dee_burris: (Default)
Sunday, February 20th, 2011 11:48 am
Funny thing about dreams...

I had "one of those" dreams last night.

The kind that just pop up out of the blue, and when you wake up from them, you're thinking, now where did THAT come from?


I wasn't even thinking about Burrises last night when I went to bed. Or Hills.

I was thinking about Callaways.

That's what made it so weird to wake up - completely awake - at 3 a.m. this morning with the feeling that I needed to go back and look up that mystery Burris kid in the 1880 census.

The one I asked my dad about two or three years years ago when I first found him. Neither of us had ever heard anything about a child born after Richard, who was the youngest of James and Adeline Burris' children.

He was as clueless as I was. Still is.


Nancy Elizabeth Burris was the oldest daughter of my g-g-grandparents, James Littleton Burris and Elizabeth Adeline Ashmore, born on 1 Apr 1845 in Pope County, AR.

On 2 Nov 1865, she married William Calvin Jones in Pope County. They had a daughter, Mary Jane, who was born on 12 Oct 1866.

Calvin Jones died of dysentery on 31 Jul 1879 in Conway County, AR, and was buried in Cedar Grove Cemetery, Conway County, AR.

So, in the 1880 census, Nancy Jones was a widow, raising her young daughter, Mary Jane, in Griffin Township, Conway County, AR.

And a little brother, Irving Burris, who was 27 years her junior.

Huh?

Photobucket

Photobucket
She knows her little brother, Irving, was born in Arkansas and that he is 8 years old. But she doesn't know where his parents were born.

Sure she doesn't.


I moved on to Nancy's parents, James and Adeline.

In the 1880 census, they were still on the homeplace in Griffin Township, Pope County.

Photobucket

Jeff Burris, their son, and Lucinda Burris, their daughter, were still living at home.

In addition, they were supporting Porter McDonald Burris, James' grand-nephew, because his mother, Sarah Ann Harrelson, had died in 1878. Porter's father must have been very ill. Two days after this census was taken, Porter's father, John Crockett Burris, died.

Photobucket

This was probably the smallest household James and Adeline had in many years.

So why was there no room at the inn for Nancy Burris Jones' little brother - and their son - Irving Burris?

Irving coincidentally fits very neatly into the birth order of Martha (Vick) Hill's children by James Littleton Burris, between Benjamin Flemons Hill and daughter, Hetty.

Only I don't believe in coincidence.


Preliminary searching in the wee small hours this morning was a big zero.

I cannot find Irving Burris, Irving Hill, * Irving Burris, * Irving Hill, or any of those other wildcard combinations in the 1900 census - in Arkansas, or in any other state, born in 1872/1873 in Arkansas.

I'll look in the other usual places - like the World War I draft - later on today.

For the mystery Burris child...