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In the back of my mind, I knew they were there.

It just took being inspired to find the little plaster of Paris Santas my son decorated the first year I toughed it out as a single mother to find them.

Oh, I found the Santas, all right...and remembered how one rainy fall day I got him to sit with me at the kitchen table, spread some newspaper out, and use our little brushes and acrylic paints to make them our own.

It started us on a homemade ornament tradition. Each year, we added the ornaments he made at school to the tree.

Now, he wanted those little Santas for his own daughters.

I didn't find them in the shed.

But as I was fighting off spiders startled from slumber, and opening one huge Rubbermaid container after another, I found something just as precious.

More ancient family memorabilia...
I packed the stuff well. No cooties, and the envelopes were all still intact, photos separated by family surname.

Not even the spiders outran me as I hustled my finds back from the shed to the cottage.

And I have been going through this stuff for hours ever since.
I have three of the keepsake books given to families by funeral homes.

I had forgotten about the one for my great grandfather, Jo Desha Williams. And I didn't recall the telegrams.

Maxie followed the directions in the book to the letter.

First his obit...


Arkansas Gazette, Sunday, Dec. 24, 1950
Jo Desha Williams, Salesman, Dies
Jo Desha Williams, aged 84, 2310 Ringo Street, died at his home Saturday. Mr. Williams was a traveling salesman for the U O Colson Co. of Paris, Ill. He was a member of the First Christian Church, a charter member of the Sons of the American Revolution, a member of the United Commercial Travelers, the WOW and the Modern WOW. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Maxine Meek Williams of Little Rock; three sons, C H Williams of Texarkana, and P M and J D Williams, Jr., both of Little Rock; and five grandchildren. Funeral arrangements will be announced by Griffin-Leggett.

Then, there was the genealogy page, in my great grandmother's handwriting.

And the telegrams of condolence...(Cousins, if you want scans of them not in collage form, let me know and I will send them along...)

According to this little book, my great-grandfather was buried at 3 p.m. the day after Christmas. The clergyman who conducted the service was Lauren West.

The irony of my find as I was looking for holiday decorations does not escape me.

I don't believe in coincidence.
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Another little ditty from the Williams' family photo album.

This time, I know who one of the subjects was...

My great grandfather, Jo Desha Williams, and someone who had to be one of his grandkids...


Ya think the sun was in their eyes?

This is a Sepia Saturday post.
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Sometimes I find myself wrapping up loose ends in my current family business that take me back in time.

Recently the issue was how many plots there were in the Williams family plot at Roselawn Cemetery in Little Rock, and who owns them.

So yesterday, I found myself looking at Roselawn's official records on the subject. It was interesting information.

On 24 Feb 1958, my grandparents, Joe Duffie Williams and Doris (Balding) Williams bought six plots at Roselawn.

Although that information was interesting to me all on its own, it was even more interesting when I considered their ages. They were in their fifties, the same decade as I am in now. They had been grandparents for 4 years, with two granddaughters at the time.

Is it time for me to be making that decision? I wonder what caused them to be making it at that time? Had Papa Joe gotten a big bonus and that was one of the things they could check off the list of business they wanted to handle?

Three years later, on 31 Oct 1961, they sold and deeded two of the plots to Lee E and Kathryn G Eoff. Mr. Eoff died in 1972, and Mrs. Eoff in 1976. They are buried in the lots purchased from my grandparents, although their graves have no markers.

I don't know how they knew the Eoffs, or even *if* they did - yet. Maybe the cemetery helped arrange that sale.

Really curious, though...
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Posted for the Monday meme on a rainy Sunday that just cries out for a scanfest...
In the interest of complete honesty and full disclosure, I probably shouldn't say unlabeled.

Because when I picked this one up to scan and flipped it over, there was pencil writing on the back.

~Eureka~ She labeled one!


Yep, she wrote on the back of it...for sure.

This is all of the class. Aren't they cute?
Yes, Granny, they are very cute.


Adorable, in fact.

Anyone feel free to give me another superlative for photos of kids...seriously, jump right in.

But which one or ones of those precious lasses is *ours*? And what was her name?

My guess is one or both of the ones with the big honking hair bows.

Williamses seemed to go in for big honking hair bows and splashy bow ties...
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I can only imagine it was great-grandma Maxie's idea to take photos of the Williams' family home in Russellville, and turn them into postcards.

So, in 1910, son Paul used one to write Mama from Little Rock:



Am leaving for H S (Hot Springs) in about an hour. Got here about 11.30. Stayed at Torrey House. Paul.

This is a Sepia Saturday post.
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And so I ask - dear Great Grandma Maxie...

Why is Teddy Roosevelt in the Williams' family photo album?


Dang, I wish that woman would come to hang out with me for one hour.

I'd put her through her paces...
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I finally took my camera and went in search of four homes where my Baldings, Chapins, and Williamses lived in Little Rock.

The first one - the address listed on the World War I draft registration card of my great grandfather, Victor Claude Balding - was at 223 Rice Street. He signed his draft registration card on 12 Sep 1918.

The house is still there - although I'm sure it looks a bit different today than it did 93 years ago.

Next, I went in search of the houses at 213 and 217 Dennison.

They are next door to each other.

My maternal grandparents, Joe Duffie Williams and Doris Geneva Balding, lived at 213. I found them at that address in city directories from 1940 to 1949.


A whole bunch of people lived at 217 for many years - including my grandother's parents and siblings, as well as her maternal grandmother, Eada Belle (Parrish) Chapin after the death of Fred Chapin right after Christmas in 1938.

According to Polk's Little Rock/North Little Rock City Directories, Fred and Eada lived at 913 North Valmar, and Eada was listed at that address in the 1939 City Directory. (I'll have to make another photo journaling trip to see if that one is still standing.)

But by 1940, Eada made her home with her daughter, Hattie Belle and son-in-law, Victor, at 217 Dennison.


In 1940, the house at 217 Dennison must have been full to overflowing, with Victor and Hattie Balding, Hattie's mother, Eada Chapin, and adult children, Ellington (Linky), daughter Marion (Murney), Marvin and Vera. All the children were employed except Linky, who was the youngest.
Across town, my grandfather's parents, Jo Desha Williams and Maxie Leah Meek, lived at 2310 South Ringo Street.


That was the home to which my grandfather, Joe Duffie Williams, took his bride Doris after they married on Halloween in 1926. They were still there when the census was taken in 1930.
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My maternal grandparents lived for at least 9 years in this tiny little rent house, still standing on Denison Street.


Image from Google Maps

1940 Polk's Little Rock City Directory

They were still there in 1949, which was the year they moved into the home they had saved for many years to build.

For cash.

Their "new" home never had a mortgage on it until it was sold to a new family after my grandmother's death in 1998.
Granddaddy's parents are shown in the left-hand column of the City Directory.

I couldn't find a decent Google Maps image of that address (or the one that I hope is still standing at 217 Denison), so my handy-dandy GPS and I are going to do some driving, cameras in tow.

The house at 217 Denison was a multi-generational home and will have its own entry, whether I can get a photo or not.

**It will be interesting to see how the GPS spells the street name - with one N or two...I find it both ways all over old documents...
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My email from was illuminating.

The numbers are fascinating. About 6 in 10 of us have a family member who lived in America during the Revolutionary War period, while only 1 in 40 have ancestors who participated in the war. That’s a lot of Revolutionary War links; 183 million folks alive today share that connection.

There are several men in my family tree who are said to have served in the Revolutionary War.

I've only been able to research one of them so far - my 4th great grandfather, Jesse Williams.

Jesse was born on 19 Jun 1750 in Newcastle Co., DE. According to his Revolutionary War pension file, he moved to Baltimore Co., MD, where he enlisted about a year and a half after his marriage to Elizabeth Rachel Gott on 24 Nov 1774. At the time of his enlistment, his second child, Richard Gott Williams, was just a couple of months old.

In the summer of 1776, he was a private, serving for three weeks. Fall of 1777, he served as a private for five weeks. Spring of 1778, as a sergeant for five weeks, and in 1779, he was an ensign for four weeks. His service was with Col. Darby Lux' regiment.

By 1780, Jesse had moved his family to Culpepper Co., VA, and during the summer of 1781, he served two months under the command of Capt. Lillard and Col. Slaughter.

On 17 Aug 1833, he was awarded a pension of $21.26 per year for his service in the Revolutionary War - about the equivalent of $569 in today's money.

Jesse Williams died 29 Sep 1834 in Rockcastle Co., KY of a femoral hemorrhage while shoeing a horse. He was buried in the Phillips Family Cemetery, Wildie, Rockcastle Co., KY.
So I guess I'm one of the 1 in 40.

Doesn't really make any difference when you consider the reason we Americans celebrate this day.

Whether you had an ancestor who fought in that first American war or not, you probably have at least one who has served in one or more wars fought since then to keep the freedom won during the Revolutionary War.

And this date on the calendar shouldn't be the only time we remember that war, or the men and women who have served our country since then.

Our ancestors paid a price so we could be free. They gave us a gift that we have come to know as a right belonging to all Americans.

We should remember them every time we vote (you *do* vote, don't you?)...

Every time we get involved in a friendly little debate at the town cafe...

Every time we take our three minutes before the City Council or the School Board and tell 'em how we think they ought to do it.

Every time we write a blog entry.

Take some time to remember them today.
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An Old Citizen of Hollywood Dies

On Tuesday, April 9 God in His infinite wisdom removed from our midst our friend and neighbor, Mrs. Sarah A. Callaway, who resided on a farm near Hollywood.

Mrs. Callaway merited the esteem and confidence of all who knew her and whereas we desire to give some feeble expression to the feelings that stir within us.

Mrs. Callaway was born in Hot Spring county, December 25th, 1860, and later moved to Clark county where she was married to John Callaway.

To this union was born four daughters and a son. Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. Marion Francis of Mena, Miss Maude Callaway who lived with her mother, Mrs. Homer Francis of Amity, and a son, Johnnie Callaway of the Mt. Olive Community.

In addition to the immediate family, she is survived by two granddaughters, a niece and several cousins.

Mrs. Callaway had been a member of the Missionary Baptist church from early girlhood, having joined the Mt. Olive Baptist church soon after it was organized.

At the age of 32 she was left a widow with four small children, the youngest being only four weeks old.

Those days, with the care and support of her little ones, were perhaps her darkest days. Mrs. Callaway labored early and late. She knew no defeat. There were times when crop failures were evident, either from overflows or from insects, many gloomy days hovering over the Callaway home, but she never gave up. She fought her battle bravely, serenely and came out victorious every year.

Her love of out-door life was evidenced by the work she performed on her farm. All of her work was performed with an inspiring quality of faith, charity and intelligence. She made an effort to view life and its conditions from the brightest angle and she was able to live comfortably in her declining years.

Mrs. Callaway was a kind hearted, clean souled woman, whose sturdy womanhood made her the example of all who in their hearts love the thing that is right.

As a neighbor she was agreeable. As a friend she possessed love to mankind and a desire to promote their prosperity and happiness. As a Christian, she remained true to her plighted faith, duty and love for her Master. As a mother she was patient, kind and devoted.

To the bereaved ones whose hearts are burdened with grief which no tongue can tell we wish to say:
"When with our loved one we're parted,
Never to meet here again,
Anguished of soul broken hearted,
Seems that we can't bear the pain,
Till we remember that Jesus
Promised us life over there,
Death is the door to release us
From earthly sorrow and care."

A friend.

Originally published in the Southern Standard, 11 Apr 1929

Note: I believe the obit is in error on the year of her birth. In the 1860 census for Greenville Twp, Clark Co., AR, she was shown as a six month old child. The census was recorded on 28 Jun 1860.
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Being unwilling to continue to tear my hair out to at least date these unlabeled photos, I was very intrigued by this post in Katherine's blog, Atlantic Roots.

So I ordered my very own copy of Dressed for the Photographer: Ordinary Americans and Fashion, 1840-1900, by Joan Severa.

It arrived yesterday.

So you know how I spent my Friday night.

I think I have much closer dates for two photos, after studying the photos in the book, as well as the excellent narrative Severa gives about other fashion clues, such as hairstyles.


This is my great-grandmother, Maxie Leah (Meek) Williams. I'm going to date this photo about 1886 (she married on 11 Feb 1886) due to the rounded bodice of the dress, as well as the collar, and the hint of the bustle on the back of the dress.

Many bodices of this period had tight sleeves cut short on the forearm and featuring cuffs or half-cuffs. (Source: Dressed for the Photographer, at page 378.)

Severa goes on to say, In eighties photographs all bodices appear corset-fitted, many with very high standing collars. Similarly, sleeves are set very high, with the armscye cut somewhat in from the point of the shoulder in back, and are extremely tight... (Id., at page 379.)

There are also dating clues in the way she wore her hair. ...In the matter of coifure, the hair will be worn a good deal lower on the neck than it has been for some two seasons past...The style of dressing the front hair remains unchanged [in curled bangs]. (Id., at page 385.)

The puff sleeves on the dress and much shorter and tightly curled bangs make me think this photo was taken in the very late 1890's, and that theory is supported by the listing of the photographer, Jno H Ganner of Russellville, in the 1900 Arkansas Business Directory.

I believe this is still Maxie Leah, but do not have a clue as to the identity of her younger companion.


This book is making a formerly dreaded chore much more fun.

This is a Sepia Saturday post.
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Doris Williams was my maternal grandmother.


Doris Balding Williams, born July 9, 1907 to Victor and Hattie C Balding in Little Rock, Ark., passed from this life on Jan. 18, 1998. She was preceded in death by her husband, Joe. D. Williams and her son, Joe C. Williams. She was a lifelong member of Second Presbyterian Church.

Survivors are a daughter, Judith Williams Neumann and son-in-law, Edward W. Neumann of North Little Rock; a daughter-in-law, Sue K. Williams of Houston, Texas; two sisters, Vera B. King, Peoria, Ariz. and Marian B. Fox, Fallbrook, Calif.; and one brother, Russell E. Balding, Sun City, Ariz.; six granddaughters, Ruth W. Toda, Long Island, N.Y., Leah W. Lipshultz, Los Angeles, Calif., Desha W. Hardin, Corpus Christi, Texas, Dee L. Sharp, Mabelvale, Ark. and Victoria B. Hill and Lorraine Burris both of Alexander, Ark.; 10 great-grandchildren, three nieces and three nephews; four step-grandchildren; three step-great granchildren.

She was an excellent seamstress, beginning at age six with an old lace curtain. She was also an avid gardener. She loved anything to do with needlework and enjoyed giving her friends things she had made. She was admired by many and will be missed greatly.

The family will receive visitors at her home, #5 Lombardy Lane, Little Rock, today, Jan. 20, from 4 to 6 p.m. Graveside funeral services by Ruebel Funeral Home will be held at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 21, 1998 at Roselawn Memorial Park, Dr. Karen Akin officiating. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to your favorite charity.
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I think my great grandparents, Jo Desha Williams and Maxie Leah Meek, were very proud and very happy with their home in Russellville, AR. They took quite a few photos of it.

The home was on East Main Street, although I do not have a house number.

Thanksgiving Day, 1899

Later, they added to it.

And again.


Unfortunately, through a combination of being underinsured after the 1906 Russellville fire, and extending credit to too many folks, after nearly 30 years in business, the Williams Grocer Co. folded.

By 1920, the Williams family sold their beloved home, and moved to Little Rock.

This is a Sepia Saturday post.
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Comparing church and military records for the Dunns, Callaways and Williamses...

In July 1863, Julia Ann (Wingfield) Callway and her son, Mason, joined Bethel Union Baptist Church in Clark County.

In 1865, Mary Dunn was a member of New Hope Methodist Church in Clark County.
In 1866, Mary and Martha Dunn were members of New Hope Methodist Church. (Lucinda Hitchcock, mother of David Andrew Williams, was also a member, although I didn't find David in the membership list, but it's a fragmented one.)

A M Callaway and D A Williams appeared on a muster roll dated from 31 Oct 1864 through 28 Feb 1865 in the 10th Arkansas Cavalry Regiment, commanded first by Reuben C Reed, and finally by Col. Robert C Newton.

On 8 Sep 1866, Mary Dunn and Allen Mason "Mace" Callaway were married by an itinerant Cumberland Presbyterian minister in Clark County.

In August 1867, Martha Dunn, Mary Callaway and James Dunn joined Bethel Union Baptist Church in Clark County.

On 27 Jun 1869, Martha Dunn and David Andrew Williams were married by a Methodist minister in Clark County.

On 2 Nov 1876, Martha Dunn Williams died of tuberculosis in Clark County.

On 15 Feb 1877, Mace Callaway died - we presume in Clark County.

On 13 Jul 1878, David Andrew Williams and Mary Dunn Callaway were married by Isom Langley, a clergyman, in Clark County.

And all the while, Robert James Dunn was living two farms over...

And my cousin Jason tells me...Capt Nat M Jones and Pvt. L. O. Ross are the ones that signed the proof of service forms for Mary to apply for her Civil War widow's pension.
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Which seems to be known variously as Capt Reuben C Reed's "old company," which was company A. (I have also seen variant spellings of his first name of Rubin and Ruben.)

Below is transcription of an article originally appearing in the Southern Standard, on 2 Apr 1908, and which was re-published by the Clark County Historical Association in its 1998 Journal.

I have been unable to find much information at all on the internet about this company, and Footnote searches for several of the men whose names are included in my family tree reveal no CSA muster roll records for them.

From another CCHA Journal article in the same 1998 publication, I saw a note that the enrolling officer for the regiment was Capt. M Crary, and the unit was comprised of mounted volunteers.

The men of most interest to me in the article below are A M Calloway (sic) and D A Williams.

Tenth Arkansas Regiment of Cavalry
Little Rock, Ark.
March 3, 1908

Editor Southern Standard:
Complying with a wish of some of the members of Capt. Reuben C Reed's old company, which was company "A" of the 10th Arkansas Regiment of Cavalry commanded by Col. Robert C. Newton, said company being raised in Clark County, some of whom are yet alive, I send you for publication the list copied from Muster Roll of October 31st 1864, now on file with General Jonathan Kellogg, Secretary of Historical Society.

The list is well preserved and is written in a good hand writing very plain and is as follows:
Reuben C. Reed, Capt.; N.M. Jones, 1st Lieut; James T. Sloan, 2nd Lieut.; W.R. Harris, 3rd Lieut.; A.G. Hearn, 1st Serg't.; K.R. Jones, 2nd Serg't.; Sterling Elder, 3rd Serg't.; W.F. Holder, 4th Serg't.; A.E. Rambo, 5th Serg't.; J.B. Smith, 1st Corp.; E.O. Rogers, 2nd Corp.; James Kellogg, 3rd Corp.; H.T. Harris, 4th Corp.

Bates, H. M.; Logan, John C.; Berry, Levi A.; Logan, T.J.; Bethea, J.B.; Lawley, John; Bettis, Lauson; Lawley, William; Billingsley, C.C.; Mackey, J.W.; Brown, E. L.; Marsh, H.C.; Brown, V.O.; May, S.B.; Buck, James; Moon, H.D.; Calloway, A.M.; Osborn, G.C.; Carlee, John Z.; Pride, T.J.; Crump, W.H.; Ross, L.O.; Davis, John H.; Ross, W.D.; Drummins, Thomas; Ross, W.P.; Fite, A.J.; Rudisill, R.M.; Fite, John D.; Russell, A.J.; Gibson, John S.; Sloan, Donald; Gates, W.W.; Sloan, W.J.; Harris, W.K.; Stafford, J.W.; Hart, G.W.; Stafford, T.J.; Harvey, W.W.; Stevenson, J.T.; Heard, T.A.; Stoval, John; Holder, T.B.; Stroope, W.S.; Holmes, H.G.L.; Wallace, J.; Huie, R.W.; Watson, John; Hunter, R.W.; West, J.R.; Jones, D.E.; Williams, D.A.; Jordan, Alex; Williams, J.H.; Littlejohn, A. W.; Williams, P.H.; Wingfield, John.

It is probable that some names with "J" as an initial should be an "I" as all are made above the line and for that reason it is immpossable (sic) to distinguish the "I's" from the "J's".

There is interesting data in connection with many names, among which is the record of those who were on a scout with Lieut. Harris to Burton, I will mention them: Lieut. W.R. Harris, E.O. Rogers, E.L. Brown, Thomas Drummins, H.G.L. Holmes, J.C. Logan, G.C. Osburne, T.J. Pride, D.A. Williams, and B.H. Williams.

In noticing more carefully I see that this report comes from October 31st, 1864 to Feb. 28th, 1865. Lieut. Joe Sloan is reported as acting Adjutant of Regiment pro tem since Feb. 19th, 1865. R.W. Huie is reported as "scout as courier to Arkadelphia." Donald Sloan is reported sick at home in Clark Co., Ark. since Dec. 25, 1864. W.J. Sloan is reported sick in hospital in Washington, Ark. Feb. 25, 1865. I might continue this almost indefinitely.

All of the above names are familiar ones in Clark County, some of whom are alive and residents of the county now. Some few of them were from Dallas county. This list of names ought to be placed on record in the clerk's office of each county: when the companies were organized for reference and for presentation, as the state will probably never do anything toward their presentation, judging by the failure of every effort to have it do something on that line, under the administrations of the last eight years.

I am appealed too often to ascertain the company and the regiment to which certain men belonged in order that the wife of some confederate soldier may be placed on the pension roll, or the soldier himself seeks the names of comrades in order to establish his service in the Confederate army. It always affords me pleasure to investigate as far as possible for them, but I am often unable to find anything because of the incompleteness of many company rolls.

Stan C. Harley
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Frankly, I was disappointed with the offerings at Ouachita Baptist University's Special Collections Section.

I did, however, make a few interesting discoveries.

A glance through the 1932 Southern Standard on microfilm did not yield an obituary I was looking for, but it did give up some interesting tidbits of local flavor about my Herrington relatives who lived in the tiny Clark County Arkansas community of DeGray.

I had never really considered it before, but what did you do for fun when you were dirt poor and the Great Depression sucked the life out of just about everything?

You went visiting...and it made the newspaper.

Searching through the conference minutes of the DeGray Baptist Church provided no information at all about where or how my g-g-grandfather, Mace Callaway died, or where he might be buried.

I asked for copies of all 17 pages of membership notes in the New Hope Methodist Church file for the years 1860-1869. There appear to be skips due to missing records, but they will be useful to my Williams cousin, Jason, and to a lesser degree, to me.

And while I was waiting for copies to be made, I scanned through the Clark County Historical Association's Journal index, and stumbled across a CSA Cavalry unit that seems to be unreported in the usual places, with alphabetized lists of troops who served.

Even more interesting is that it appears possible that Mace Callaway and David Andrew Williams may have served in that cavalry unit together, as shown on a muster roll covering the time from 31 Oct 1864 through 28 Feb 1865. (I'll transcribe that as a separate entry later.)

Another of the CCHA's journals provides more information about years in which Bob Dunn was mentioned in the minutes of the Red River Baptist Association.

So the CCHA made $45 off me today. I bought the 1991, 1993, and 1998 Journals.

Cousin Joe and I made an appalling discovery at the Clark County Courthouse.

We were looking for the letters of administration in the estate of one of our many greats grandpappies, John Callaway, who died intestate in 1834 in Clark County. Joe knew that John Callaway's estate was enumerated in an attachment to the letters of administration.

The probate clerk was able to provide us with a copy of the 6 Jan 1835 probate court order appointing John's widow, Amy, and his son, John S T, as co-administrators of the estate (they were, by the way, fined by the court in 1842 for failure to file an annual accounting of the estate - oops), but the clerk said we'd have to go to the books to look for the letters of administration.

So all three of us tromped over to the closet where the books are kept. 1840 was as far back as we could find.

So the clerk asked us if we wanted to take a look through the other books in storage.

In the attic.


Books with documents over 175 years old are IN THE ATTIC. With no climate control.

And not just in the attic...they were just dumped in the attic in hodge-podge, helter skelter fashion...many looking as if they were thrown in there by whomever was assigned the chore of moving them because before they had been IN THE BASEMENT - where they kept getting damp.

Joe and I kept grimacing at each other over the clerk's head as we looked, each of us righting a book here and there.

We did not find the letters of administration of the estate.

I'm hoping that book was rescued by the Arkansas History Commission and filmed.

So I'll be squinting at microfilm there tomorrow.

The journey is good.

And it continues...
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My office is undergoing renovation in stages.

There's a window of opportunity for me to try and fill in some pieces in the Bob, Mary, and Martha Dunn mystery.

It's time for the rubber to meet the road. Next Thursday and Friday, I'm taking leave from the office and going to Hot Spring and Clark counties to try and get some answers. My Callaway cousin, Joe, is going to shepherd me through the Special Collections section of Ouachita Baptist University.

I'm also going to be cold-calling a cousin who lives in Arkadelphia who has never heard of me. I understand he may have some answers - and maybe even some documents and pictures.

I can hardly wait...

You too can create a puzzle out of one of your own family photos by going here.
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There's no tombstone for Martha L Dunn of which I am aware. I have no idea where she is buried, and the places I would customarily look have left me empty handed.

I think Martha was the sister of my g-g-grandmother, Mary C Dunn.

As with Mary, and the man I suspect is her brother, Bob Dunn, I can't find her in the census as a child.

Martha L Dunn was married to David Andrew Williams in 1869. According to her obituary, she bore him two children, although I have been able only to account for one.

Martha L Dunn Williams' obituary as published in
The Southern Standard in Arkadelphia, Clark County, Arkansas
on 11 Nov 1876, on page 3 column 3.

At Hollywood, in this county, on the 2d inst. Mrs. Martha L., wife of Mr. David Williams, of this city, in the 28th year of her age.

She had been a severe sufferer, with that dread disease, consumption, for the past eighteen months, but bore her sufferings with that patience and fortitude known only to the truly religious, and died in the full triumphs of a well grounded faith. She leaves a husband, two children and numerous friends to mourn her loss.

Getting a generation behind these Dunns is one of my biggest brick walls.
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Jo Desha Williams, with his sons Cedric and Paul, Thanksgiving 1899

This is a Sepia Saturday post.
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Funeral Notice
The funeral service of
Cathrine Leah,
the beloved 5-year-old daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. J D Williams,
will take place at the Christian
Church at 2 o'clock this after-
noon, services to be conducted by
Eld. C C Cline and Dr G W
Friends of the family invited
to attend.

Russellville, Ark.., December 9, 1904


*I don't know who wrote the text for the card, but from the mis-spelling of her name, I am guessing probably it was someone at church or a family friend.


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Dee Burris Blakley

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