dee_burris: (Default)
2016-05-01 08:42 am

Narrowing the gap...

Because of the letters and telegrams from Minnie Shinn to her brother, Jo Desha Williams, I am able to reliably track my great grandparents' movements, and the places they lived.

The 1915 letters place them at their home in Russellville, where they began their married life.
 photo Williamshouse3.jpg


The latest of those two letters was postmarked 4 Feb 1915.

The 1930 telegrams announcing the death of Minnie's son, Joseph Roy Longworth Shinn, were dated 13 and 14 Feb 1930, and sent to my great grandfather in Little Rock, at 2310 Ringo Street.

 photo 2310 ringo street this.jpg


With the letters and telegrams alone, I knew that Desha and Maxie moved from Russellville between 4 Feb 1915 and 14 Feb 1930.

However, from the 1920 census - taken on 10 Jan 1920 - I learned they were already in Little Rock, living at 709 East 14th Street.
 photo 709 east 14th.jpg
Now, I'd like to narrow it further.

I think I'll spend some time at the library, looking through old Little Rock City Directories on Ancestry.
Image from Google Earth, taken July 2015
dee_burris: (Default)
2016-04-30 07:18 am
Entry tags:

AHA! I guessed right...

In my email yesterday was one from the sole surviving sister of Joe Thomas Meek, who wrote a very interesting letter in 1983 about a trip he had taken to Mississippi to see the graves of his great grandfather (my second great grandfather) James Alexander Meek, and James' parents.

After studying that letter in more depth for almost a year, I put forth a theory about why Joe Meek's grandfather had decreed that [n]one of the family can ever be named JAMES or ALEXANDER again, as my grandfather (William Thaddeus Meek) promised.

According to my correspondence with my second cousin, once removed, I was right.
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2016-04-24 05:30 am
Entry tags:

Reconnecting with my Balding cousins

Two of my Balding cousins, Parry and Frances, have been in town this weekend for a funeral for their mother, Miriam Roots Parke Balding.

Parry and Frances are my first cousins, once removed - the son and daughter of Aunt Miriam and my grand uncle, Marvin Parrish Balding, Sr. We are all so close in age that it's often easy to forget they are not my first cousins.

But we had not seen each other since we were all children. This Balding family removed (as our ancestors would say) to Annandale, VA in our childhood. I've been Facebook friends with Parry for a while now, and as a family we recently rounded up the funds to mark the grave of another close Balding relative.

But that's not the same.
Naturally, we reminisced about family. In addition to visiting family graves at Roselawn Memorial Park, we went later in the day to Oakland & Fraternal Historic Cemetery Park to visit Balding and Chapin graves.

I went home after Aunt Miriam's service, and waited for Parry and Frances to call about going to Oakland. I got to thinking about Aunt Miriam's middle name - Roots - and wondered.

Was she descended from Logan Holt Roots, the former Congressman from Arkansas, who is buried at Oakland?

 photo Roots.jpg
Family plot of Logan Holt Roots and Emily Margaret Blakeslee


I starting digging farther back into her family tree, and discovered that yes, she was. Logan Holt Roots was Aunt Miriam's great grandfather.

But when I returned to my desk after the trip to Oakland, the Roots family story got even better.
Logan Holt Roots was born on 26 Mar 1841 to Benajah Guernsey Roots and Martha Sibley Holt, at Locust Hill near Tamaroa in Perry County, IL.

As a young man, Benajah Roots moved from his birthplace in Onondaga Co., NY to Sparta, in Randolph Co., IL. There he built a cabin, and went back to New York to get his wife and two children, Oliver Guernsey and Philander Keep Roots. (The latter was known by most people as P K, probably a mercy for a child at any time.)

By 1854, Benajah built a frame house that served the family as both home and school. The home was known as Locust Farm/Locust Hill Academy, and was located near Tamaroa, Perry Co., IL.

In addition to his roles as an educator, civil engineer and lawyer, Benajah Roots was also a stalwart abolitionist, who assisted slaves to freedom through the Underground Railroad. His Locust Hill home with the secret passageway in the basement has been definitively proven to be part of the network of homes used to hide runaway slaves on their way to Canada.

The Southern Illinoian described the danger of Roots' actions this way:
...Jean Ibendahl points out that Root's stand was not popular with his neighbors.

"This was a hotbed of Southern sympathizers," Ibendahl said. "Once, they threatened to tar and feather him, so he left until tempers had cooled down."...One time, two slave owners were convinced Roots had their slaves hidden in the cistern, even though they had searched the property and found nothing.

"They camped in the orchard, which was south of the house," Ibendahl said. "Roots sawed a hole in the kitchen floor to give the slaves food and water. Finally, the owners gave up and left..."

It's the stories of the ancestors - even though these are not mine - that create the fullness of their lives long after they are gone.

Everyone has a story.

I love this one.
dee_burris: (Default)
2016-04-09 10:39 am

I finally found Molly Ann Tipps' family

Five years ago, I wrote that I hoped I was closing in on Molly Ann Tipps, my step-mom's great grandmother.

I thought I found the identity of her parents from her death certificate. The informant for her death certificate was her daughter-in-law, Ella (Haun) Coffman.

But George Tipps and his wife, Maggie, were not her parents. I found Molly's parents this morning.

And eleven of her siblings.
I had checked the 1860 census for Molly, born Margaret Anna Tipps in March 1858 in Tennessee. This morning, still under the impression I had the right set of parents, I decided to look again.

That's when I saw a little girl named Margaret in Franklin Co., TN in 1860. By the time I got through the preliminaries on continuing to track this family, I had found eleven siblings - Molly appears to have been the youngest child - one of whom had a heartbreaking end in the Loudon Co., TX poor farm.

Here's what I was able to figure out...

Molly's parents were John Franklin Tipps and Samira Hall. I found them in the 1840, 1850, and 1860 census. Their first three children were daughters, including Rachael M Tipps Neal, who died in the Loudon County poor farm.

A note on Racheal's death certificate said:
This woman was an inmate of the county poor house, and nothing is known of her parents. I made a correction to that record in Ancestry.
 photo page 1.jpg


John F Tipps and Samira Hall appear to have lived in Franklin Co., TN most, if not all, of their married lives, adding to their family with regularity.

One this page of the report, there are three more daughters, and three sons. Son George Larkin Tipps was a Methodist circuit riding preacher.
 photo page 2.jpg


Another son and another daughter were born before Molly.
 photo page 3.jpg


Since I didn't find either John or Samira Tipps after the 1860 census, I assume they may have died. I have more research to do on them. I haven't found a grave for either of them at Find a Grave, so I can't link Molly to them.

I've done the next best thing I can, and added hyperlinks to the known burials of some of Molly's siblings on her Find a Grave memorial.

Now, I'll keep on looking...
 photo 63edae12-292f-47f7-8565-6e845c56cf7a.png
dee_burris: (Default)
2016-04-02 09:59 am

Angels in Stone: Children's Stones

For many years, historians and geneaologists have said that death of children did not evoke the same feelings in parents of the 19th and early 20th centuries that it does in parents of today.

The thought was that there were so many children born that parents realized there would be a certain level of infant and child mortality. That's just the way it was. They didn't look at their children like we do ours.

Thankfully, that line of thinking is changing.

Because all you have to do is go to a cemetery with children's graves of that time, and look at the gravestones.


dee_burris: (Default)
2016-03-31 07:32 am

Preserving historic Arkansas cemeteries

A few short months ago, I asked a few of my friends to help form a non-profit tax exempt organization to provide promotional and supplemental financial support to municipal cemeteries in Arkansas listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

There are nineteen such cemeteries, and being owned by cities, they face unique challenges. Money is the first of those. Citizens of cities are not keen about being hit up for donations to operate and maintain city owned property when taxes are being levied for that purpose.

We created Stories in Stone, Inc. at the end of December last year. By mid February of this year, the Internal Revenue Service had decided we were a good idea, and granted our tax exemption.
We are operating on a dream and a shoestring right now.

We need your help. There are several ways you can help us.

Bookmark our website, and check it frequently. We are traveling to all of the cemeteries to photograph them. Each cemetery has a page on our website That's one of the ways we are promoting the cemeteries to all of those of us who brake for cemeteries, and can wander for hours, camera in hand, drinking in the history and art. If you are reading this blog, then you like cemeteries, too.

Follow us on Facebook. Give us a "like." It will boost our appearance on Facebook pages of others who are also interested in historic cemeteries.

Donate some money. Our website and Facebook page have a "Donate" button that takes you to our PayPal page. It doesn't have to break the bank. Donations in the amounts of $5 and $10 can add up, and help us to do some wonderful things. You don't have to have a PayPal account to use the button - you can use your credit/debit card, or your bank account. All donations are tax deductible.
You will find six videos on the Stories in Stone YouTube Channel.

We'd appreciate you watching any or all of these, and giving them a like.

And spread the word.

Our goal is to try and save history, one stone at a time.
dee_burris: (Default)
2016-03-01 08:55 am

Is Ancestry.com trying to kill off Rootsweb?

In the left sidebar of this blog, you will see links to five family trees I manage, and that I host at Rootsweb. There is now a sixth that I had not yet added.

And probably won't.

Rootsweb, the red-headed stepchild of Ancestry.com, has been down now for nearly a week.

I didn't make that discovery until last Friday, when I uploaded my GEDCOM for my own family tree. According to the message displayed at that link:
This database is currently being updated. It should be online in a few minutes. Please wait for the screen to refresh with the updated information. If it has not been processed in a few hours please try your upload again.

Since Friday. More than "a few minutes."
I sent Rootsweb an inquiry yesterday. This is the canned response I got:
Response (Kevin) (02/29/2016 10:49 AM)
Dear Dee,

Thank you for contacting RootsWeb in regard to the uploading and processing of a World Connect tree.

The site is currently down due to ongoing technical issues. This includes access to and the processing of any World Connect trees. We hope to have the issues resolved soon. We are sorry for the inconvenience and appreciate your patience.

If there is anything else with which we might assist you, please let us know.

Kevin
RootsWeb Support Team
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com
Email: helpdesk-post@rootsweb.com

I stewed about that asinine response all day long.

I woke up this morning just as peeved as when I went to bed last night.

I just sent this response:
I'd like to thank you for this response, but find myself unable to do so.

Ongoing technical issues? Or trying to do away with the free Rootsweb services thousands of us use because we believe that our genealogy information should be freely available to folks who lack the resources for a subscription to Ancestry.com?

I fail to understand how a company as large as Ancestry.com, which has been systematically buying up other genealogy resources - including another free one, Find a Grave - does not have the wherewithal to get the free service back online. The $1.6 billion Ancestry got in 2012 when it agreed to be acquired by Permira Advisors, LLP has all been spent? All the tech team sent packing? My understanding is that as of 2011, Ancestry had revenue in the US alone of $399.7 million.

Surely a bit of that revenue can be used to get Rootsweb back online.

A note - I am currently a subscriber of Ancestry.com. However, that can change.

My GEDCOM is still processing...and after careful consideration, reading the blog entries of other geneabloggers about this ridiculous downtime and the post to your own message board which has been closed to further comment, and weighing my options, I have decided to move all six of my GEDCOMS to another service which thankfully is not yet controlled by Ancestry.com.

And I'll be telling the readers of my blog exactly why.

I am determined to keep the information in all six of the GEDCOMS I manage freely available to others.

As I move each GEDCOM, I will update its link in the sidebar.

With gratitude to Dr. Beverly Hofstadter,

Needy baby, greedy baby...
dee_burris: (Default)
2016-02-19 05:47 am

Marking the grave...

I got a bundle of old newspaper clippings, telegrams and letters from my youngest sister not long ago. In that bundle was a clipping that solved a riddle for me.

I never understood why my great great grandmother, Laura Isabelle Cunningham Balding was buried at Oakland & Fraternal Historic Cemetery Park. Her husband, James Henry Balding, was a musician in the Civil War for the Confederate States of America. When he died, he would be buried in the Confederate soldiers section of what is now the Little Rock National Cemetery.

Wives and widows could be buried with their husbands. So why was Laura buried next door at Oakland? I pondered that for several years, until I read the death notice for Laura and Henry's youngest daughter, Ethel Clare Balding, and a letter that told me Ethel Clare had died of congestive fever (malaria) and was buried in the city cemetery.

The city cemetery was Oakland, purchased on 31 Dec 1862 from a plantation owner.

That sent me on a search through Oakland's digitized deed and burial records. I found the deed for a single lot, purchased for $2.50 on 13 Oct 1890, two days after Ethel Clare Balding died. But there was no stone.

No stone for a nine year old child. The family pitched in to mark her grave.

On 4 Feb 2016 - 125 years after her death - Ethel Clare Balding's grave was properly marked with a gravestone I hope would make my great great grandparents smile.

 photo Ethel Clare Balding.jpg


The sexton placed it at the foot of her mother's grave, because we believe Ethel Clare was buried there, her remains perpendicular to her mother's.

 photo Ethel Clare Balding and Laura Cunningham Balding.jpg

It's never too late to do the right thing.

The journey is good.
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2015-12-25 08:07 am

And now I know what happened to James Ernest Balding...

I've been on a campaign to find James Ernest Balding's resting place, once I found out that his youngest sister was buried here in Little Rock.

I knew from California Death Index information that he died on 2 Apr 1944 in Los Angeles County, CA. But I didn't realize I had access to his death certificate on Family Search until this morning.

I had to scroll through hundreds of 1944 California death certificates to find it. But when I saw his name at the top of the certificate, I rejoiced. Now I'd know where he was buried.

Only he wasn't. His body was donated as a "specimen" to the University of Southern California.
James Balding died alone in an institution called Ranchos Los Amigos at Hondo, CA (now Downey, CA), where he spent the last 8 years, 5 months, and 7 days of his life. The certificate notes that his wife's name was Ella - he and Dora Enderlin had divorced prior to the 1940 census, where she listed her marital status as divorced. In the 1930 census, they were married and living in Los Angeles County.

I had not been able to find James in the 1940 census. It's possible I could now, knowing more geographic detail about where he was during that census.
From this website, I learned about the history of Rancho Los Amigos, including the period of time in which James was a patient there. Here's an excerpt - you should click the link and read the rest.

The southern campus of the Rancho Los Amigos Hospital is often referred to as the "Hollydale Mental Hospital" or the "Downey Insane Asylum" in contemporary times, however these misnomers paint an incorrect picture of the hospital's past use, which was much broader than just caring for the mentally ill. It was built in 1888 as a catch-all institution for the Los Angeles County Medical Center; a place to care for the handicapped, homeless, insane and elderly. The hospital was located in the former town of Hondo, which was absorbed by Downey in the 1950s. Funded by county bond money, it was simply called the County Poor Farm. Here, able-bodied residents could work on a large farm which sustained most of the hospital's dietary needs, in lieu of paying for room and board and medical care. These tenants were typically the homeless who drank too often, and just needed a few sober weeks of manual labor on the farm. Others worked on crafts such as wool clothes and rugs, which would be sold to the public. The 600 acres of property also encompassed an aviary, zoo, and rail line used for freight and passengers. Unclaimed bodies of residents who died at the poor farm were buried at a potter's field nearby, which has been relocated (but no one seems to know where, exactly) after torrential flooding washed away some of the caskets in 1914.

In 1918, the Spanish influenza epidemic hit the area, and the facility began treating all victims rather than just the indigent, and the word "Poor" was simply stricken from the name of the facility. The hospital expanded greatly in the 1920s to alleviate overcrowding conditions and rebuild flood-damaged structures, leading to the construction of the Spanish Colonial Revival buildings seen today. In 1932, the name of the institution was changed once again to Rancho Los Amigos, which translates to "Ranch of the Friends." The wide range of activities offered at the hospital were making it a legendary place to receive physical and occupational therapy; swimming, woodworking and weaving proved to help restore broken limbs and spirits. One example was that of a man with a badly crippled left arm and hand; the therapist placed a sanding block in it and directed the patient to sand furniture, which exercised the muscles and the patient also earned his own stipend to spend at the hospital store. Another patient who suffered from polio learned to paint by wielding an artist's brush between her teeth after 10 years of recovery.

After the Long Beach earthquake disaster in 1933, a large group of Rancho patients flooded the county supervisor Roger Jessup's office. They told tragic tales in hopes that he would push for funding improvements at Rancho to help the many victims. Some of these real-life stories were so traumatic that Jessup's secretary, Grace Wagner, became "hysterical" after hearing them, and actually leaped out of the office window and plummeted to her death.


But that's information from just the top of the certificate. It was the rest that hurt my heart.
James Ernest Balding died of complications of central nervous system syphilis. The final "stage starts after three years of exposure and infection to syphilis. Typically, the person is no longer contagious with the disease, but the gram-negative bacteria in the body can reactivate, reproduce, multiply, and spread drastically throughout the body. At this point, the infection spreads to all the systems in the human body, including the nervous system, bones, eyes, and heart. Neurosyphilis at this point can cause several damages to the body, including tabes dorsalis. When the nervous system is infected at this particular stage, the individual is at risk for meningeal syphilis, which in turn slowly shuts down the entire body. The tertiary stages can also cause the growth of many tumors, and lead to cancerous affects in the body. This stage can be diagnosed through specific tests in serology. The nonspecific tests may be negative. At this point, there is little treatment the individual can pursue, and the body shuts down as a whole." Source: Wikipedia.

Death certificate for James Ernest Balding, 1878-1944
 photo James Ernest Balding death certificate.jpg
This discovery gives rise to dozens of questions, most of which I expect will never be answered. Stuff like...

Who was Ella? The institution didn't know how old she was, making me believe they were not in touch with her, and possibly didn't know how to contact her to ask her.

Did Dora and James divorce because of his syphilis? They appeared as husband and wife in the 1920 and 1930 censuses, so they were together for a while.

Was Pop Balding notified of his brother's death? Both parents were already dead. Aside from Ella, Pop and Ione (nee' Balding Seaman Sisson) were James' only known survivors.

Who gave his biographical history when he was admitted? Hospital staff did not know all of his parents' biographic information - something you'd collect at admission, and certainly in a facility where people came to die.

So many questions, not so many answers.

But enough for me to create a Find a Grave memorial for him.

Because everyone has a story. Even if there's no happy ending.
dee_burris: (Default)
2015-11-17 06:09 am

Once upon a time, there was a girl named Mary...

.

.

.

.
 photo MaryCDunnCallawayWilliams edit.jpg
Mary C Dunn, during the time of her marriage to Allen Mason Lowery Callaway, 1866-1877


She was my great great grandmother. Her name was Mary C Dunn. Over the years, I've documented her first and second marriages in Clark Co., AR, her children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren. Even 4th great grandchildren. I know how and when she died. I know where she is buried.

But I could never find her parents. I tried. I talked to her portrait frequently, hoping to prompt some lucid dreaming that would show me some obvious thing I had overlooked.
Then, a few years after I started my search, I met a cousin through Mary's second marriage.

He was VERY helpful in finding information about Mary's younger brother, Bob Dunn, who came to see her from Texas. We were fortunate to have this very weird photo of the two of them standing in front of a bedsheet.
 photo BobDunnMaryCallaway enhanced.jpg

From time to time, I would search through census records in Floyd Co., GA, looking for Dunns that fit this family of three known siblings, Martha, Mary and Robert J Dunn. Floyd Co., GA is where Bob Dunn (or RJ, as he was called in many historic documents) was born, according to a birth certificate for one of his daughters.

I could find age appropriate combos of any two of those names, but not all of them together, when they had to be little kids.

In any event, Floyd Co., GA didn't cut it for any date after 8 Sep 1866, when Mary married my great great grandfather.

I ordered her death certificate, thinking since she died at her daughter's house, the information would be there.

Nope. Her son and informant for the certificate, Ruben Ned Williams, said her mother was unknown. And that her father was Mr. Dunn.

I did not believe that Mary had never talked about her parents to her children, even if she was separated from them by distance or death.

Highly irritating. I can trace my Callaways back to 1667 in Somerset Co., MD, when Maryland was Maryland Colony, because there was no United States of America.

But in Mary's case, I couldn't get back any farther than 5 Jan 1849, when she was born.
Over the weekend, I got an email from Jason Williams, who is the cousin who found all that Texas information on Bob Dunn. Jason had been looking at some DNA matches for his father, and was back in census records for Floyd Co., GA.

He wanted me to look at one from 1850.
 photo 1850 census Floyd Co GA pg1 crop1.jpg

There at the bottom of the page were a couple - E Dunn, age 28, and his wife, Sarah Ann Dunn, age 24. Both were born in Georgia.
 photo 1850 census Floyd Co GA pg1 crop2.jpg


E Dunn (whom we soon determined was Ezekiel Dunn) and Sarah Ann Dunn had four children, according to the transcription of the census. Sure enough, at the top of the next page were four children.
 photo 1850 census Floyd Co GA pg2 crop1.jpg


The census enumerator had written the first two names of the oldest child - 6 year old William Berry. Then s/he had enumerated the younger children, James E, Mary C, and Martha L. With a quote ("), sometimes seen as DO on census records, meaning same surname. S/he never carried the family surname, Dunn, over to the top of the second age for this family. It also looks to me as if the children had originally been enumerated as a separate household, someone realized the error later, and went back and scribbled out the house and family numbers at the far left of the first line.

So for a transcriptionist - all transcriptionists throughout all the years - the four children had become William Berry/Burry, James E Berry/Burry, Mary C Berry/Burry, and Martha L Berry/Burry.

Except for my eagle-eyed cousin, on what must have been his umpteenth pass through 1850 census records for Floyd Co., GA. It didn't look right.

Obviously not. I knew Jason was on to something.
In case any of my first cousins are reading this, and wondering how a guy named Jason Williams is related to us, he's our third cousin. Mary was his great great grandmother through her second marriage to David Andrew Williams.

Mary C Dunn -> Ruben Ned Williams -> Howard Ruben Williams -> Jason's dad -> Jason
Many, many emails later, Jason (who has done almost all the work) and I have determined the following...

Ezekiel Dunn and Sarah Ann Meeks married on 8 Sep 1842 in Floyd Co., GA.

They had at least 6 children: William Berry Dunn, born 1844 in Floyd Co., GA, died before 1870 in Clark Co., AR; James Alexander Dunn, born 3 Feb 1846 in Floyd Co., GA, died 29 Mar 1908 in Searcy Co., AR; Martha L Dunn, who said she was born in 1848 in order to get her marriage license in Clark Co., AR in 1869 to marry David Andrew Williams, died 2 Nov 1876 from tuberculosis in Clark Co., AR; Mary C Dunn, born 5 Jan 1849 in Floyd Co., GA, died 9 Apr 1929 in Clark Co., AR; Robert J Dunn, born 3 Dec 1853 in Cave Spring, Floyd Co., GA, died 15 Dec 1926 in Sulphur Springs, Hunt Co., TX; and Ezekiel Dunn, born 1856 - probably in Floyd Co., GA, although there are records that say he was born in Arkansas.
Then we lose the children in 1860 - at least neither Jason or I have found them with other surnames yet.

But Sarah Ann Meeks Dunn was found in the 1860 census - with her new husband, David Benjamin Cagle - whom she married in Clark Co., AR on 13 May 1860. They were living in Greenville Twp., Clark Co., AR. None of Sarah's children are with the new couple, although several of David Benjamin Cagle's children are living with them.

Now, Mary's marriage record to Mace Callaway in 1866 made more sense to me:
Oct. 15th 1866 Clark Co Ark.

This is to certify that I, James Wilson, a regularly ordained minister of the gospel of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church did on the 8th of September 1866 solemnize the rights of matrimony between Mace Callaway, aged 20 years and wife Mary C Dunn, aged 17 years. He having no parent or guardian and her having no Father and the consent of her mother made her home with another family. In their presents (sic) was the right for [illegible]. Both residents of this county and State. My credentials recorded Batesville Independence County Ark. James Wilson


Sometime between 1856 and 1860, Sarah Ann Meeks had been widowed, and relocated to Clark Co., AR. Her six children had been placed with other families. In 1870, Jason found 14 year old Ezekiel Dunn living with Green Anderson Malcom and his wife, Susan, in Greenville Twp., Clark Co., AR.

Did David Benjamin Cagle refuse to allow his new wife to have her children with her? At the time of their marriage, her youngest was only 4 years old. Were the children with either Ezekiel or Sarah's families back in Floyd Co., GA until she could get settled and send for them? Was there just no room at the Cagle inn for them?
Sarah Ann Meeks and David Benjamin Cagle had two known children - Rufus Miles Cagle, born 7 Feb 1861 in Clark Co., AR, died 10 Jan 1929 in Clark Co., AR; and Henry E Cagle, born 1865 in Clark Co., AR.

In the 1900 census, Sarah Ann Meeks, having been widowed after the 1880 census, was living with her son, Rufus Miles Cagle, and his family in Caddo, Clark Co., AR. She said she was the mother of 9 children, 5 of whom were living at the time of the census. Jason and I have only documented 8 children. I think there was a Dunn child - probably her firstborn - who died at birth or in infancy.

And here's the kicker - in that 1900 census, Sarah Ann Meeks is living one home over from her widowed daughter, Mary C Dunn Callaway Williams, and Mary's two sons, Ruben Ned and Willie Williams.

So why didn't Ned Williams remember his grandmother 29 years later when he gave information for his mother's death certificate?

We will probably never know.
Naturally, the next steps are to flesh out as much information as we can about Mary's siblings and their families, and to try to keep going backward to find the parents of Ezekiel Dunn and Sarah Ann Meeks. Jason is hot on that trail, burning the midnight oil.

And the journey is good.
dee_burris: (Default)
2015-10-31 03:33 pm

Photographs and memories...

 photo Burris clan holga-ish.jpg
Burris clan in Russellville, Pope Co., AR, circa 1920/1921


There's a wall of photographs over my bed. I call it my dead relatives gallery, and I'm not really joking, although some of my family and friends laugh nervously when I say it.

I'm using this journal to share information I have acquired over the past several years for surnames in my family tree. The journal is "tag intensive" to make it easier to locate information and photos about specific surnames. (Tags list is in the left sidebar of the journal.)

They say you can choose your friends, but not your family. Personally, I find my family fascinating, and even more so the older I get. Sure, we have our share of archetypes - shrill, bossy women...strong "silent type" men...and the requisite number of "crazies." But hey, this is the deep South, and as Julia Sugarbaker said in Designing Women:

"...we're proud of our crazy people. We don't hide them up in the attic. We bring 'em right down to the living room and show 'em off. ...no one in the South ever asks if you have crazy people in your family. They just ask what side they're on." Like Julia, mine are on both sides.

Primary surnames researched include Ashmore, Balding, Burris, Callaway, Chapin, Darter, Duvall, Grooms, Harkey, Hayslip, Herrington, Hill, Holder, McBrayer, Meek, Parrish, Pettit, Shinn, Wharton, Williams.

All comments are welcome, including anonymous comments. You do not have to be a Dreamwidth member to comment, and may use Open ID, i.e., Google, WordPress, etc., to comment.

ETA: Most of the photos you will find in this journal were taken over 100 years ago. Regardless of their age, these photos were falling out of albums, or lying loose among family papers and I have scanned them to preserve them for posterity. Photos of gravestones appearing in this journal were taken by me.

I said all that to say this - if any of these photos are of your family members, just right click and save them to your computer. No one associated with this journal is going to chase you down to try and prosecute you for copyright infringement, as long as you don't claim you took the photo.

© Dee Burris Blakley, 2010-2016.. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Dee Burris Blakley with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Email me at sharpchick13 at hotmail dot com.
dee_burris: (Default)
2015-06-29 05:47 pm

"Fearful Accident"

Yesterday, I went to the annual Callaway-Holder reunion in Clark Co., AR.

From one of my cousins, I learned how one of our other cousins had been very badly injured while employed in the office of the Pulaski County Circuit Clerk in 1892.

Sterling Roseberry Brown was the son of Emily Owsley Callaway. She was the daughter of Jonathan Owsley Callaway and Emily Hemphill. (Cousins of my generation, we descend from Jonathan Owsley Callaway's younger brother, Nathaniel C. Callaway.)
A TERRIBLE FALL
Ex-Chancery Clerk S. R. Brown Meets With An Awful Accident
He falls asleep while sitting in a window and plunges headforemost on a stone coping


S.R. Brown, an ex-Chancery Clerk, who has been employed recently in the Circuit Clerk's office, met with an accident about 2 o'clock this morning which is likely to prove fatal.

He had been working in the office since 8 o'clock, copying deeds.

He finished his work about 2 o'clock this morning and took a seat in the window on the north side of the building.

He fell asleep and fell out of the window, striking his head against the stone coping below, cutting a large gash in his head over the left eye. Employees in the office picked him up in an unconscious condition, and there being no hacks on the stand, the patrol wagon was called for, and he was taken to his uncle's residence on Nineteenth and Louisiana streets.

His body was cold and rigid, and from a hasty examination it appeared that his skull had been badly fractured.

Arkansas Gazette, Tuesday, 19 Jul 1892

A CRITICAL CASE
Condition of S.R. Brown Who Fell Out of the Court-house Window


Mr. S.R. Brown, who fell from a window in the Circuit Clerk's office early yesterday morning, is very seriously hurt. His skull was fractured and was trephined1 by his physicians early yesterday morning. At a late hour last night he was resting as well as could be expected.

The operation was performed several hours after the accident occurred, and although well performed, may not prove successful in saving the young man's life. Mr. Brown was kept under the influence of opiates during the day, and although he was able to understand what was spoken, he could only make answers to questions asked of him by a nod of the head.

With the exception of a partial paralysis he appears to suffer in no part of his body except the head. He has free use of his limbs and there is no evidence of bruises on his body, which increase the hope of his friends that he has received no internal injuries, and that he may be able to recover.

Several small bones were taken from the skull about two inches above the left eye, the opening being covered by a silver plate about the size of a quarter. Had the accident occurred the time of day when prompt surgical treatment could have been rendered, the chances for recovery would have been much better than under the present circumstances. His injury and his present symptoms are almost identically the same as those of the late Judge Martin, who lost his life recently in Oklahoma, O.T.

Arkansas Gazette, Wednesday, 20 Jul 1892

Fearful Accident
Mr. S.R. Brown, of Little Rock, who has many friends and relatives here, will be pained to read the following from the Little Rock Gazette, of Wednesday last [text substantially the same as 19 Jul 1892 Arkansas Gazette article, with the following exception]...He was taken to the residence of his uncle, Maj. J.W. Caloway (sic) where he lies in a critical condition.
The Southern Standard, Friday, 22 Jul 1892
It appears that Roseberry Brown recovered and went on to live for eighteen more years.

Sterling Roseberry Brown
Sterling Roseberry Brown, 50 years old, died at 8:30 o'clock last night at the home of his aunt, Mrs. J.W. Calloway (sic) 1900 Louisiana street.

Mr. Brown was born in Arkadelphia, where he lived until 1877, when he came to Little Rock. He lived here until 1906, when he moved to Lake Village to accept a position as deputy county clerk of Chicot County. He returned to Little Rock the first part of May and lived here until his death. During his former residence in this city, he was chancery clerk of Pulaski county for two terms. He was a member of the Royal Arcanum, Knights of Pythias and the Masonic lodge.

The body will be sent to Arkadelphia for burial.

Arkansas Gazette, Saturday, 21 May 1910

Death of Roseberry Brown

Sterling Roseberry Brown, aged 50 years, died at 6:30 o'clock on Friday night, the 20th of May at the home of his aunt, Mrs. J.W. Callaway2 in Little Rock. The remains were shipped to this place, his former home and placed in charge of Undertaker Newberry, and on Monday morning carried to Mt. Pisgah Cemetery3 and interred...His health failed him and then three weeks ago he returned to Little Rock.
The Southern Standard, Thursday, 26 May 1910
Sterling Roseberry Brown was buried beside his mother, Emily Owsley Callaway Brown, and shares a gravestone with her.
 photo Arnold - Brown Sterling Roseberry and Emily Owsley Callaway.jpg

 photo Arnold - Brown Sterling Roseberry closer.jpg

So now for my musings...

Here's what the north side of the Pulaski County Courthouse looks like:
 photo North side Pulaski Co Courthouse.jpg


*I think in order to have hit his head on stone coping, Roseberry fell from a third story window. I'd love to know which one was the one where the Circuit Clerks slaved away copying deeds. You know they put the lowest of the low highest in the Courthouse to suffer through the summer heat...
ETA 30 Jun 2015: A commenter on Facebook noted that the white stone annex was not added to the Pulaski County Courthouse until 1913. So, Roseberry would have fallen from a window on the north side of the original red stone courthouse.
 photo 100_0804a.jpg


*It's incredible to me that 27 years after he surrendered to Union troops at Shreveport, and "walked the whole distance back to Arkadelphia," Jonathan Wilson Callaway still called himself "Major." He did not die in the service of the Confederate States of America, nor were there career opportunities for him in the CSA after his surrender. I think that probably says a lot about his attitude toward black Americans afterward.

*I know journalism was different back then, but can you say "run on sentence?"
1tre·phine
trəˈfīn,trəˈfēn/
noun 1. a hole saw used in surgery to remove a circle of tissue or bone.
verb 1. operate on with a trephine.

2Annie Vickers Callaway, widow of Jonathan Wilson Callaway.

3Mt. Pisgah Cemetery is now known as Arnold Cemetery.
dee_burris: (Default)
2015-06-29 07:36 am

Burrises in the Callaway Cemetery

This is so maddening.

Noodling around with searches to connect a bunch of Vernon Co., MO Callaways to mine.

Because I know they have to be descendants of Peter and not Thomas...

And then I find all these Burrises buried in the Callaway Cemetery in Vernon County.

And cannot connect any of them - there's a really well documented genealogy complete with links - to my Burrises.

And the men with the older records were born in North Carolina. We believe our William Burris came from North Carolina.

Just maddening...
dee_burris: (Default)
2015-06-19 11:46 am

Errata. Because I have to set the record straight...

 photo IsabelleHerringtonLockridgeandBenjaminThomasHerrington 2.jpg
Isabelle Jane "Belle" Herrington, and older brother, Benjamin Thomas Herrington.
Photo circa 1945.

During the last four or five years of her life, my Aunt Jean was a tremendous source of information about some of the folks in our family tree.

It was when she and I were looking at my copy of the photo above, shared by my Aunt Mary Ann, that Aunt Jean told me about Belle Herrington's first marriage. She said her grandaunt Belle - her mother's paternal aunt - had been married first to a man named Boyd Thomason. She said it was a brief marriage, and then, Aunt Belle married Smith Lochridge.

I dutifully made the notes, and later, set out to find out about Aunt Belle's first, brief marriage.
I never could find a record of that first marriage.

And to complicate things, I found Aunt Belle in the 1920 census in Sparkman, in Dallas County, working as a "servant in a hotel." I thought that was odd, because most of the rest of her family lived in Malvern, in Hot Spring County, with the exception of her oldest brother, Jasper, who lived in Clark County.

Aunt Belle was a widow with two children.

And her last name was Jones. I scoured all the usual places to find the departed Mr. Jones, to no avail.

And concluded that Aunt Belle was married to Mr. Jones no later than age 21, so how could there have been an earlier marriage to anyone named Boyd Thomason?
In the fall of 2013, I published this entry, stating that Aunt Belle had not been married to anyone named Boyd Thomason, and if anyone reading the entry could tell me who Mr. Jones was, to please contact me.

I got that contact last week, by email.

From a descendant of the Thomason family, who knew quite a lot about Aaron Boyd Thomason.

Aaron Boyd Thomason was born on 26 Nov 1878 in Butler Co., KY to Thomas Lindsey Thomason and Mary E Langford. He was nearly ten years older than Aunt Belle.

According to my Thomason correspondent, Boyd (he was called by his middle name) and his brother Vivian, traveled multiple times in the early 1900s to Arkansas, Texas and Oklahoma to work the oil fields and the timber industry. He surmises that it must have been on one of those trips to Arkansas that Boyd met and married Belle. He also said that Boyd owned a hotel and some stores in Arkansas and Oklahoma.

And he sent photos of the family that span a period roughly between 1910 (shortly after their daughter Ethel's birth) to about 1913, shortly after their son Thomas Boyd Thomason's birth.

 photo AaronBoydThomason_Ethel_Belle.jpg
Boyd, Ethel and Belle Thomason, photo circa 1910-1911

 photo AaronBoydThomasonandEthel.jpg
Boyd and Ethel

 photo ThomasBoydThomason.jpg
Thomas Boyd Thomason, born 16 Feb 1912

So then, I wondered...what happened to the marriage?

By 1920, Belle was calling herself a widow. That was a very common occurrence for women who were divorced, a shameful marital status in those days.

Both the children were born in Kentucky, Boyd's family home. I found a birth record for Thomas, and he was born in Paducah, McCracken Co., KY.

And I wondered about that. Why would Belle have been in Kentucky? Could her bridegroom have wanted to get her away from her own family? Was Belle's family disapproving of her choice in a mate?

But even more curious - why did Belle change her last name?
The Thomason descendant who emailed me had other information that caused me to think of some possible reasons why Belle Herrington was not simply content to be Belle Thomason.

In 1926, Boyd Thomason returned to Kentucky. To Logan County, where he robbed the Auburn bank. Although the bank robbery took place long after Belle and Boyd split (I keep remembering Aunt Jean saying it was a brief first marriage), what if Belle had become aware of some shady business dealings? Or some outright crimes?

I think it is possible that Belle and Boyd split up before he registered for the draft during World War I, in 1918. He did not list a wife as his nearest living relative.

 photo Boyd Thomason WWI draft card.jpg


What if Belle did not want to be connected in any way, shape or form to Boyd Thomason - and didn't want her kids connected to him either?

Or what if it was dangerous to be known as the ex-wife of Boyd Thomason?
Belle changed her surname and that of her children at a time when people could do that with no legal messiness. You just started using your new name, and that was that.

Her children retained Jones as their legal surnames - Ethel until her marriage to Orvel James Jones, and Thomas Boyd for the rest of his life, which included a stint in the United States Navy during World War II.

Belle remarried, to Smith Lochridge in 1927. They were living with Belle's daughter and son-in-law in the 1940 census, in Weleetka, Okfuskee Co., OK. Smith Lochridge died in 1941, and Belle spent her later years living in Weleetka, close to her daughter. Belle died in 1973 and is buried in Hillcrest Cemetery in Weleetka.

But Boyd Thomason lost the care and comfort of his family.
The 1930 census found Boyd doing time in the Kentucky Branch Penitentiary in Eddyville, KY.

I couldn't find him in the 1940 census. But I found him on 28 Apr 1943, in Terre Haute IN when he had to register for the old men's draft for World War II.

 photo AAron B Thomason no one.jpg


He was 64 years old, homeless, unemployed, and no one would know how to get in touch with him.

From my Thomason email correspondent:
His family here in Kentucky didn't want anything to do with him because he almost took them down with him. After the bank robbery, my grandfather rode him across the river in his wagon (not knowing he was on the run) and he hid the money under a fence post on my great-grandfather's farm (his brother). They were both mentioned in the newspaper articles and just barely avoided arrest. Nobody trusted him after that. I've heard a great aunt of mine who remembered him say he abandoned his family out west.
Aaron Boyd Thomason died on 24 Nov 1945 in Mount Vernon, Jefferson Co., IL. He was buried three days later in Oakwood Cemetery in Mount Vernon.

I understand he had cousins there.

 photo Aaron_Boyd_Thomason.jpg
Aaron Boyd Thomason

If any of the descendants of Ethel Jones (nee Thomason) Jones or Thomas Boyd Jones (nee Thomason) find this entry, you are welcome to right click and save on any of these photos.
dee_burris: (Default)
2015-06-11 07:29 am

Musing on cycles...

As I write this, I am sitting in one of my favorite places - my east porch, which looks out on gardens I built.

I have lived in this spot for twenty years. As I age, I am very glad I built the bones of these gardens as a younger woman.

And as I admire the results of my efforts two decades ago, I feel very close to both of my grandmothers. They also built gardens, and spent considerable time in their gardens.

Addie Louise Herrington had an herbaceous perennial border six feet deep around the perimeter of her home on Crittenden Street in Arkadelphia. I remember especially her camellia, and all of those blue hydrangeas.

Grandma Burris didn't have a porch, apart from the screened entryway to the kitchen. But she and Granddaddy Burris did put lawn chairs in the shaded part of the backyard.

 photo AddieLouiseHerringtonBurris1928.jpg
Louise Herrington Burris, 1908-1980


Doris Geneva Balding had a fully landscaped garden - of her design and built with a lot of her sweat. She hired out the large jobs - like the brick wall she paid my dad to build around her back garden.

Grandma Dee had a terrace, and almost always had a comfortable cushion laid out on her favorite terrace chair. She and Papaw Joe used the terrace as an extension of their home, an outdoor room.

 photo 020.jpg
Doris Balding Williams, 1907-1998

I totally "get it."

I know why my grandmothers spent so much time and put so much effort in their gardens.

There are times when you have to earth yourself. Times when yanking out weeds, and feeling crumbly earth slipping through your fingers allows you to leave behind what seemed just a few moments ago to be so important.

Times when you lose track of time as you let your garden consume all your senses. When the garden tells you that we are all connected.

And it teaches you that no matter what your spiritual paradigm, we humans are totally unnecessary to the changing of the cycles of nature. We're just gravy on the finished product, and will leave this earthly experience behind one day.

And the cycles will go on. So we don't need to go messing up this wondrous creation with toxins and a laissez faire attitude that we can just use, and use, and use without ever giving back.
These days, I am trying to just maintain the gardens. There's enough work in that for me.

My building projects have now turned to gardening in miniature.
 photo 06 04 2015 gnome garden3.jpg
gnome garden, May 2015


My anchor plant in the gnome garden is a dwarf twisted Hinoki cypress.
 photo 06 11 2015 dwarf hinoki cypress.jpg
Dwarf Twisted Hinoki Cypress 'Tsatsumi'


This little tree is a slow grower. Eventually it will outgrow the space, getting a couple of feet tall and about as wide. I haven't researched how it would respond to root pruning to keep it smaller. I'm really looking forward to seeing curling bark.

As time goes by, I can enjoy the planning of its replacement, and relocate this little cypress to its own pot.
The journey is good. I can make it even better by taking time to appreciate my garden.

I love and miss you both.

I'll see you on the other side.
dee_burris: (Default)
2015-06-09 08:52 am
Entry tags:

My ancestors mess with me

 photo pop_art_cartoon_ginger_woman_tearing_hair_out_-_154569740__medium_4x3.jpg

And not just in that maddening, tear-your-hair-out sense that comes with reaching a brick wall with them.

Sometimes they talk to me.

Not necessarily in words.

Grampa Chapin has been talking of late. His portrait keeps listing ever so slightly to the west.

Not every day, but for the last week or so, I'll look up in the morning, and see that it's tilted. I always straighten it up.

Naturally, I look for logical explanations first.
The cottage is a mobile home, so I thought maybe this occurred when the washer was on the spin cycle, and the vibrations were moving the portrait.

So I looked several times this morning to see if it happened. Nope, didn't move even a millimeter. Besides that, I only use the washer a couple of times a week. I haven't seen a connection.

I've stomped across the living room floor. No movement. But anyway, I don't stomp around the cottage.

I've slammed the door. No movement. I've slammed the wooden gates on the front and back of the porch.

Nada, zip, zilch.

So, I figure Grampa Chapin wants to get my attention for some reason.

It's those kinds of moments that make me grin, because they just reinforce the truism.

The journey is good.
dee_burris: (Default)
2015-06-03 06:53 am

Where did that child get off to?

My sister and I went to Oakland & Fraternal Historic Cemetery Park yesterday to decorate family graves.

Together, we have a combined total of over two dozen ancestors, relatives and extended family members buried there, including several members of my brother-in-law's family.

And as we were placing flowers on the grave of our great great grandmother, Laura Isabelle Cunningham Balding, it finally hit me that the two people buried next to her were her son-in-law, Charles Edwin Seaman and her granddaughter, Ethel Ione Seaman Rich, Charles' daughter from his marriage to Laura's daughter, Nellie Ione Balding.

So natch, my genealogy ADD kicked in and as I was exploring this part of the family in greater depth, I ran into the birth certificate for Arthur Robert Sisson. He was Nellie's son from her second marriage to Arthur Wright Sisson.

 photo Arthur Robert Sisson birth cert.jpg


It says that with Arthur's birth, Nellie had borne 5 children, 4 of whom were living.

Who was the fifth kid, please? I can only account for Charles Ernest Seaman, Victor Claude Seaman, Ethel Ione Seaman Rich, and Arthur Robert Sisson. Was this fifth child a Seaman or Sisson?
dee_burris: (Default)
2015-05-29 08:18 am

"All in all, it's just another brick in the wall..."**

 photo jigsaw puzzle.jpg
I really enjoy appreciate use the bookmark feature in my family tree database software.

It allows me to pointedly obsess about family members who are the individual bricks in the all-too-familiar ancestral brick wall.

There they are, all splayed out in the left-hand column of my display. Of course, I can go to a different view so I don't see them.

But what's the fun in that? Part of the tortuous thrill of family history research is banging your head against those brick walls.

You know what I mean? Until it hurts so good.

Over, and over, and over.
So since he's there, and since I want so badly to be able to prove that Robert James Dunn was the younger brother of my great great grandmother Mary C. Dunn, circumstantially speaking, I already know he is.
Today, I found out where in Georgia he was born.

Just searching census records for the whole big, honking state of Georgia for Dunns is pointless.

I was actually looking at one of his daughters by Bob's second wife, Betty Dorella Wofford. (She was the 15 and a half year old daughter of Bob's neighbor, and was pregnant with their first child. But that's another story. Scroll about halfway down for the newspaper clipping.)

Florence Ella Dunn's birth certificate says her father was born in Cave Spring, GA. That's in Floyd County.
 photo Florence Ella Dunn birth certificate.jpg


So you know what I did next. Spent the next hour looking for Dunn in Floyd Co., GA in the 1850 and 1860 censuses, hoping I'd find Bob's parents.

Over the results returned, none of them fit - or else Bob, OR Mary and Martha - had been kicked to the curb as little kids.

There was even one couple living in Cave Spring, GA in the 1860 census. But they were 22 and 18 years old, no kids in the home, and too young to have been the parents of Martha, Mary and Robert Dunn.

I keep his photo close and talk to it from time to time. Because sometimes, they give me signs.

The journey is good.




**With apologies to Pink Floyd. But the lyrics to the first part are just too appropos...

And before you ask, you too can create a jigsaw puzzle from one of your family photos by clicking here.
dee_burris: (Default)
2015-03-20 10:02 am
Entry tags:

Because everyone has a story...

The more I shake the family tree, the larger it becomes.

And as I add people to it, I frequently discover facts about them that make me go in search of other facts.

Like why Hurrell Burris Tackett's World War II draft registration card had this big X on the front of it, and a notation Died Aug 4 1941.

He was just 27 years old.
I only ran across Hurrell - or HB, as he was apparently called - when I was researching Ora and Willie D Burris, sisters who married the same man.

They were the daughters of William Matthew Burris and Susan Rebecca Dalrymple.

Ora was the oldest, and married John Thomas Tackett when she was 16. Just a kid.

But so was Tom - he was also 16 when they married. They had five children, although I can only find three. The 1900 census says Ora was the mother of two children, one of whom was living at the time of the census (that was Thomas Orval Tackett). By 1910, Ora had borne five children, but only three of them were living - Thomas, Reba May and Clyde D.

And Ora must have been ill. Willie was living with Ora, Tom and the three children in Little Rock in the 1910 census. Ora died on 25 May 1910, three weeks after the 1910 census was taken on the family. Prior to her death, she was a dressmaker, working from home. Tom was a grocery manager. Seventeen year old Willie must have been taking care of the kids.
I can imagine that Willie was a comfort and provided sorely needed help for for her brother-in-law, caring for her nieces and nephew during her sister's illness and after her death.

Whether there was a blossoming romance or not, I do not know. Perhaps the logic of the arrangement was what prompted the marriage.

I think their families must have approved. Although Tom Tackett and Willie Burris were living in Little Rock, they went back home to Pope County to marry on 19 May 1913.

They had one child together, a son.

Hurrell Burris Tackett was born on 26 Jun 1914 in Little Rock.
The next record I ran into on HB Tackett was his own marriage record.

Pope County family ties must have been strong. HB married Sadie Maxine Claybrook on 6 Feb 1937 in Pope County.

A 1939 entry in the Little Rock, Arkansas, City Directory showed the couple living at 2103 Center Street in Little Rock.

And then came that curious draft card.
 photo WWII reg page 1.jpg

HB Tackett signed the card on 16 Oct 1940.

And since the draft registration was apparently cancelled in some fashion, I knew he did not die in World War II.

So I ordered his death certificate from the Arkansas Department of Health.

And waited.
HB's death certificate said he died of "fracture of the skull with brain injury" due to an auto accident on "highway #10" in Little Rock.

I knew there must have been news coverage of the accident. There was.
 photo AR Gazette Sunday 3 Aug 1941.jpg

Four Injured in Automobile Collision

Four persons were injured, one seriously, in an automobile accident several miles west of Little Rock on the Joseph T Robinson highway shortly before 1 this (Sunday) morning.

H.B. Tackett, who lives near Roosevelt road and Broadway, suffered an acute brain injury. Charliene Reinoehl, 511 East Seventh, received a broken leg. V.O. Tackett and William D. Vance were bruised. The vitims told deputy sheriffs their automobile was in a collision. They were taken to University hospital.

Arkansas Gazette, Sunday, 3 Aug 1941

And the next day...
 photo AR Gazette Monday 4 Aug 1941.jpg

Accident Victim Given Slim Recovery Chance

H.B. Tackett, Route 2, Little Rock, injured in an automobile accident five miles from Little Rock on Highway No. 10, was said to have "a slim chance of recovering" by attendants at the University hospital last night.

A brother, V.O. Tackett, Miss Charlene Reinoehl and William D. Vance, all of 511 East Seventh street, were released yesterday after receiving treatment for cuts and bruises. Deputy sheriffs said the Tackett car collided with a second car which failed to stop following the accident.

Arkansas Gazette, Monday, 4 Aug 1941

HB Tackett died of his injuries at 7:40 p.m. on 4 Aug 1941 at University Hospital.
HB's father provided the information for his death certificate. I found that HB was buried in Roselawn Memorial Park, in Little Rock, on 6 Aug 1941.

I called Roselawn because I had not been able to locate burial information for Tom or Willie Tackett. They are also buried at Roselawn.

When Tom Tackett gave the information for his son's death certificate, he said HB was single. I found that curious, and have been unable to find either death or divorce information for Sadie Maxine Claybrook Tackett.

And the second news article had an error in it. VO Tackett was not HB's brother. He was his first cousin - the son of Tom Tackett's older brother, Jesse Epp Tackett.

But I imagine the cousins were close. When VO's mother died in 1925 when VO was 11 years old, VO came to live with Tom and Willie Tackett by 1930, in Little Rock. So he and HB did spend a portion of their teenage years together.

In my mind's eye, I can see a distraught VO Tackett telling sheriff's deputies...

He's my brother.
You can leave a virtual flower on HB Tackett's Find a Grave memorial by clicking here.