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March 12th, 2011

dee_burris: (Default)
Saturday, March 12th, 2011 03:08 pm
Photobucket
Jo Desha and Maxie Leah Williams family, Christmas Day 1900
photo by McLeod, the Wild West photographer


Every time I see this one, I just dissolve into gales of laughter.

Can't you just imagine the dinner table discussion a couple of weeks before the holiday?

"Honey, what shall we do this year for Christmas? After all, it's the first Christmas of the new century."

Oh, I don't know. . .hey, why don't we get that McLeod guy to take a picture? We could dress up and go sit outside on some rocks."

"Marvelous idea, darling! And we could put Paul and Cedric on a couple of asses. They've been acting like asses for a few days now. It would serve them right. . ."


The back of the photo has an extensive ad for "McLeod, the Wild West Photographer. . . the man who made Happy Hollow famous the world over."


This is a Sepia Saturday post.
dee_burris: (Default)
Saturday, March 12th, 2011 04:14 pm
Well, everything, if you're talking about spelling...

There's an interesting story in our Herrington family about the spelling of the surname.

When Jasper Monroe Herrington married my great grandmother, Julia Ann (Callaway) McBrayer, he - like she - had already been married before and widowed.

Jasper's son by his second wife, Mary Ann Cothran, was John Richard Herrington. Dick, as he was called, was only 3 when Jasper and Julia married, and she already had 7 kids by Robert McBrayer.

I don't know how they decided there was no room for Dick Herrington in the tiny little house, but they did. (I mean, there wasn't room for all those kids, which combined, numbered 11, but how did they pick Dick to be the odd one out?) Jasper and Julia went on to have 6 children of their own. In the 1910 census, Richard was living with them, but not in 1920.

He went to live with a couple named John and Nora Johnson in Hot Spring County - he is shown there in the 1920 census as a foster son.

John Johnson told Dick that the RIGHT way to spell Herrington was with an "a," i.e., Harrington. So Dick did.

He was the only one of Jasper's descendants to spell the surname that way. I had a heckuva time finding his grave, but finally did. He's buried in Rest Haven Memorial Gardens in Arkadelphia.
dee_burris: (Default)
Saturday, March 12th, 2011 10:12 pm
William Hemphill Callaway "Big Bill"
His obituary, as printed in the Southern Standard, 10 Feb 1899, page 3, col. 4:
"Callaway, W H, died at his residence Wednesday night at 11 o'clock. He had been in feeble heath for several months. At the time of his death he was the coroner of this county. He was one of the oldest native citizens of the county, being in his 72nd year of age. He was somewhat of a remarkable character, and had a remarkable memory and could relate more early history of the county than probably any other citizen. "Big Bill" as he was called by his firends will be greatly missed on the streets."

William Arnett Callaway "Little Bill"
His obit from the Southern Standard, 2 Apr 1887:
"Callaway, William Arnott, died at his residence in Arkadelphia on the night of the 29th ult., County and Probate Judge of Clark Co., at the age of 63, after a lingering illness of rheumatic paralysis. The funeral services at his late residence on Wednesday afternoon, were officed by Rev. John McLauchlan, past of the Methodist Church of this place...Rose Hill Cemetery."

James Lawson Callaway
His obituary, as published in the Southern Standard, 7 Dec 1888, page 3, col. 4:
"Callaway, James L. Dr., of Hollywood, died very suddenly last Monday of paralysis of the heart. He had gone to the residence of Uncle Dick Wilson Monday morning to transact some business, and not finding Mr. Wilson at home, decided to wait for his return, but the time for his return had passed, and mounting his horse, started for home, but had gone but a few paces when he suddenly fell from his horse dead, and Mrs. Wilson hurriedly advanced to where he had fallen, stricken with death. We understand Dr. Callaway had been troubled with heart disease for some time. Dr. Callaway was well known here having been here all his life. His ancestors were among the first settlers of this county in the long ago."

Emily Ida Callaway
Her obituary, as published in the Southern Standard, 16 Aug 1873, page 2, col 6:
"Callaway, Emily Ida, died, daughter of W A and Emily L Callway, was born Sept. 1 1872 and died Aug. 10, 1873...for the eighth time, death has made requisition upon this home circle."