2010-12-05

dee_burris: (Default)
2010-12-05 10:26 am
Entry tags:

Resources

Here are some of the *free* research resources I use that may not be on everyone's radar.

Books We Own
So how about all those books you've collected over the years? You got what you needed out of them, but what if someone else could get benefit from them too, and you'd still get to keep them?

This is a look-up service, and a really good idea, whether you are a donor or recipient of information. (Gentle nudge: you can be a volunteer...I just signed up.)

From my brief glance, it appears to include books owned by people world-wide.

Arkansas Civil War Research
For Arkansas researchers, there is the Edward G. Gerdes Civil War Home Page for Arkansas.

I don't know how many years it took them, but these guys have done a spectacular job with their research. Although there is more coverage of Confederate soldiers, they do have quite a bit on Union troops from Arkansas.

Illnesses and Causes of Death
So what is scrofula or quinsy when you see it as an illness or cause of death?

Causes of Death in the Late 19th Century mentioned in the Register of Deaths, 1893-1907 defines these and a whole lot more...

If you can't find it there, then try this one.

Historic Money Conversion
Ever wonder just how much great-great grandpa's estate was worth in 1870? Try this historic currency converter.

Or this one.

Birth and Death Information from Missouri
Many of my ancestors settled in Missouri. The Missouri Secretary of State's office maintains an archive of searchable birth and death records pre- and post-1910 (through 1959), here.

Weather
Ever wonder how the weather affected your ancestors?

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) maintains historic weather data from 1872 through 2008 at this website.

Disasters in History
And how about those disasters - either natural or manmade?

Look for articles about those in a searchable database here.

Rotating Census Maps
Maybe it wasn't your relatives that moved, it was the counties that did.
dee_burris: (Default)
2010-12-05 10:16 pm

Amanuensis Monday

Just about every researcher of the Burris line that starts with William Burris born about 1782 would give his/her eyeteeth to be able to find the identities of William Burris' parents.

They remained unidentified in 1937, according to a letter I found in the Burriss/Burress/Burris family folder at the Lawrence Co., TN Archives.

The letter was written (or more likely, dictated) by William Andrew Burris, son of James Littleton Burris, and grandson of the elusive William. In 1937, William Andrew would have been 84 years old - he died six years later in Oklahoma.

Settled in Pennsylvania. Scotch Irish. Sent to Virginia. My grandfather William Burris was a in-denture boy. There he lost trace of his people. Was taken to Lawrenceburg Tenn. There he raised his family and died there.

Children all borned in Tenn. John Burris, Frank Burris, Jonathan Burris, Richard Burris, Carle Burris, James Burris and Sinday Burris whom married a Mason. Nancy Burris whom married a Wiggs. They was another girl whose name I do not have.

John Burris went to Pope Co., Ark. Nov. 1839. His family consist of 3 boys Bill, Frank, John and 3 girls.

Jonathan Burris went to Reelfoot Lake Kentuckey. His family consisted of 3 boys, Stan, Wily and Hue.

Richard stayed in Tenn. One boy Henry and one girl.

Carle moved to Bates Co., MO and died there. His family consist of 6 boys. Lonzo, Toney, Max, James, John and William.

James moved to Pope Co., Ark. His family consist of 6 boys. Frank, John, Bill, George, Jeff and Dick. 3 girls.

Frank moved to Pope Co., Ark. His family consist of 3 boys John, Bill and James. They were 3 girls.

They was one uncle who went to Texas that was lost track of.

This July 2, 1937
By William Andrew Burris


There were two things I learned from this letter.

Counter to oral family history, Jonathan Burris did not drown while crossing the Mississippi River with his brothers during their 1838 emigration from Lawrence Co to Pope Co., AR.

William Burris' parentage has always been a mystery in the family.